College of East Asian Studies

The College of East Asian Studies (CEAS) challenges students to understand China, Japan, and Korea through the rigors of language study and the analytical tools of various academic disciplines. This process demands both broad exposure to different subjects and a focused perspective on a particular feature of the East Asian landscape. Japan, China, and Korea are related yet distinctive civilizations. Each has its own traditions and patterns of development. These traditions have played an important role in the development of culture around the globe and remain formative influences today.

Students interested in East Asian studies will be guided by the expectations for liberal learning at Wesleyan and by the CEAS's interdisciplinary approach. Language, premodern history and culture, and the sophomore Proseminar provide the common core of our program. The Proseminar exposes students to a wide variety of intellectual approaches to East Asian studies and thereby provides a foundation for students to focus in more depth in particular areas.

Faculty

Scott W. Aalgaard
BA, University of Victoria; MA, University of Victoria; MA, University of Chicago; PHD, University of Chicago
Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies

Stephen Angle
BA, Yale University; PHD, University of Michigan
Mansfield Freeman Professor of East Asian Studies; Professor of Philosophy; Professor, East Asian Studies

Hyejoo Back
BS, Busan National University; MED, Busan National University; PHD, SUNY at Albany
Assistant Professor of the Practice in East Asian Studies

Joan Cho
BA, University of Rochester; MA, Harvard University; PHD, Harvard University
Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies; Assistant Professor, Government

Mary Alice Haddad
BA, Amherst College; MA, University of Washington; PHD, University of Washington
Professor of Government; Chair, College of East Asian Studies; Professor, East Asian Studies; Professor, Environmental Studies

William D. Johnston
BA, Elmira College; MA, Harvard University; PHD, Harvard University
Professor of History; Academic Secretary; Professor, East Asian Studies; Professor, Science in Society; Professor, Environmental Studies

Naho Maruta
MA, University of Wisconsin
Assistant Professor of the Practice in East Asian Studies

Keiji Shinohara
Artist-in-Residence, Art; Artist-in-Residence, East Asian Studies

Ying Jia Tan
BA, University of California, Berkeley; MA, Stanford University; MPHIL, Yale University; PHD, Yale University
Assistant Professor of History; Assistant Professor, East Asian Studies

Ao Wang
BA, Beijing University; MA, Washington University; PHD, Yale University
Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies

Takeshi Watanabe
BA, Yale University; PHD, Yale University
Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies

Xiaomiao Zhu
MA, Wesleyan University
Adjunct Professor of East Asian Studies

Affiliated Faculty

Patrick Dowdey
BA, University of Pennsylvania; MA, University of California LA; PHD, University of California LA
Visiting Scholar in East Asian Studies

Yu-ting Huang
Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies, starting in 2018

Masami Imai
BA, U. of Wisconsin Eau Claire; PHD, University Calif Davis
Professor of Economics; Chair, Economics; Professor, East Asian Studies

Marguerite Nguyen
BA, Duke University; PHD, University of California, Berkeley
Assistant Professor of English; Assistant Professor, East Asian Studies

Jing Zeng
Visiting Scholar in East Asian Studies

Su Zheng
BA, Central Conservatory of Music; MA, New York University; PHD, Wesleyan University
Associate Professor of Music; Associate Professor, East Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Visiting Faculty

Miyuki Hatano-Cohen
Visiting Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies

Mengjun Liu
BA, Beijing Normal University; MA, Nanjing Normal University
Visiting Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies

Emeriti

Yoshiko Yokochi Samuel
BA, Aichi Prefectural Women's Coll; MA, Michigan State University; MA, Indiana University Bloomington; PHD, Indiana University Bloomington
Professor of Asian Languages and Literatures, Emerita

Ellen B. Widmer
BA, Wellesley College; MA, Tufts University; MA, Harvard University; MAA, Wesleyan University; PHD, Harvard University
Kenan Professor of the Humanities, Emerita and Professor of Asian Languages and Literatures, Emerita

Departmental Advising Experts

All program faculty

College of East Asian Studies

CEAS155 Fictional Japan: Introduction to Japanese Literature and Culture

This course will explore the evolution of Japanese fictional narrative, from Japan's first encounter with "modern" literary forms in the late 19th century to postmodern digital discourses advanced through anime and gaming. In so doing, we will discuss the ways in which Japanese theories of literature intersect with notions of national identity, modernity, and Westernization. How does the Japanese novel participate in the modern process of nation building, and how is it used to situate Japan's position in East Asia and the world? We will also consider fictional works from marginalized groups in Japan to address how notions of gender and ethnicity serve as an intervention into traditional discourses on Japanese literature. Finally, we will explore new iterations of Japanese fiction in the form of digital media and database narratives. Does advanced technology fundamentally change how we produce and consume narratives and, therefore, view the world around us? How do these new forms impact constructions of national history and identity? Is this phenomenon somehow unique to Japan, or a simple product of globalization?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS160 Social and Political Changes in Korea

Korea is currently the only divided country in the world, with two different political systems--democracy and dictatorship. This course explores developments on the Korean peninsula in the modern to contemporary period. We will examine social change, demography, culture, politics, and economy, as well as various social and cultural issues facing Korean society today.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CEAS
Identical With: GOVT280
Prereq: None

CEAS165 Anthropology of Contemporary Chinese Art

This course will survey the contemporary Chinese art world from an anthropological perspective. It puts the accent back on China to survey the course of modernization in an ancient art tradition. Beginning in 1930, Chinese artists developed new forms of artistic practice, organization, and expression in a process of creative diversification that leads directly to the profusion of styles and expressions we see today. We will examine the historical and cultural impetus for modernization in the Chinese art world: the complicated initial engagements with Western art; the effects of politicization of the art world under the Chinese Communist Party (CCP); the spirited and complex development of visual art during the reform period; and, finally, the effects of Chinese artists' gradual entry into the international art world. Our focus on Chinese concerns including painting from life, figure drawing, line vs. chiaroscuro, realism, folk arts, and the importance of heritage will orient our survey and keep us focused on the Chinese rather than international art world. The style of the course will be syncretic: Materials from anthropology, art history, and history, as well as images from comics, design, photography, and, of course, painting, will be presented in a rich cultural context. Readings from the anthropology of art, on art in contemporary and traditional China, and on history will help us develop an idea of the way that artistic practices help form an art world. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the native background for the current craze for Chinese art in the West as well as the ability to discuss art worlds and relations between art worlds with different aesthetic systems. No knowledge of Chinese or Chinese history is required for this course.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ANTH
Identical With: ANTH245, ARHA255
Prereq: None

CEAS166 Understanding the Arts of Imperial China: Content and Methods

With its long history and diverse culture, Imperial China was known for its rich and complex traditions in art. From the magnificent terracotta warriors and splendid court paintings to delicate blue-and-white porcelain, these artworks not only testify to the complexity of the society that produced them, they also suggest visual principles and ideological premises by which they can be understood. This course offers an introduction to the important roles that art played in the society of Imperial China and discusses their visual principles and ideological premises so we can comprehend the artworks themselves. By examining three large groups of artworks from Imperial China--ritual objects and monuments from the early periods, courtly paintings and calligraphy from the middle periods, and commercial goods of factory art from the late imperial periods--we will look at the relationship of form and content, the materiality of artworks, questions of the artist's agency, and the context in which artworks were produced, transmitted, and consumed. The goal of this course is to encourage interest in the arts and culture of Imperial China as well as basic issues in the field of art history.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARHA182
Prereq: None

CEAS167 Goddesses and Heroines: Images of Women in the Art of China and Taiwan

This course examines the history of visual representations of women in China and Taiwan from the 12th to the early 20th century. During this period, images of women increasingly appeared in the art of China and Taiwan as guardians and advocates for the weak and the suffering, as well as political or moral allegories. These mythical and legendary figures, such as Guanyin, Mazu, and Nie Xiaoqian, empowered both women and men who were in poverty, peril, or despair. Their heroic and divine images combine traits of feminine qualities highlighted in a male-chauvinistic tradition and symbols of a mega-being beyond any gender-specific definition. By tracing the formation and transformation of images of women in the art of China and Taiwan, this course will explore three themes: (1) the development of female cults in the visual cultures of China and Taiwan; (2) the relationship of feminine representation, human morality, and divine power in Chinese and Taiwanese societies; and (3) the negotiation of political and cultural identities in these societies through the appropriation of female images. The goal of this course is to offer students contextualized knowledge about women's roles in the arts and visual cultures of China and Taiwan.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARHA278, FGSS279
Prereq: None

CEAS168 Art of No-Return: Modern and Contemporary Chinese Art

With record-breaking auction prices, often in the millions for a single work, modern and contemporary Chinese art has captured international attention over the past two decades. These works, often flamboyant and contentious, reflect the political, social, and cultural changes that China has experienced since the conclusion of its dynastic past in 1911. In this course, we will examine the development of modern and contemporary Chinese art in the context of these changes, from the influx of Western social theories in the 1920s and '30s, through the Japanese invasion and the political upheavals during the Mao (1893--1976) and post-Mao eras, to the socio-economic reforms of the 1980s to the present times. We will study leading artists, such as Xu Beihong, Ai Weiwei and Zhang Huan, whose works in painting, sculpture, architecture, installation, and performance art helped to define the new Chinese art. While examining the artworks, we will explore issues related to the tension between Chinese nationalism and Westernization, the adaptation of modern aesthetics and visual technologies, the conflict between state sponsorship and censorship, the changing perception of gender and self-image, the emergence of urban space and consumer culture, and the connection between art and the global economy. The goal of this course is to provide an advanced understanding of Chinese art in the present times.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARHA288
Prereq: None

CEAS180 Japan Rocks: Music in/as Contemporary Japanese Studies

This course aims to consider topics in modern and contemporary (understood as post-War) Japanese society through the lens of musical expression. By attending to specific instances of musical expression in modern and contemporary Japan, we will strive to understand not only the songs themselves but the contexts within which they were produced. This course aims to take music not merely as an object of study/analysis but as a means by which we might both critique and build upon the discipline of Japanese studies and area studies in general.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS181 Chinese Pop Culture

Popular culture is closely associated with our daily life and ways of thinking, seeing, and connecting with the world. This course will introduce select aspects of modern and contemporary Chinese-language popular culture and its circulation among Chinese-speaking sites, including China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. We will mainly focus on forms that have circulated and continue to circulate from the modern to the contemporary period, including movie musicals, martial arts, Internet culture, and singing contests. We will also study how Chinese pop culture has influenced audiences and (re-)construct their identities, as well as explore how cultural producers in Chinese language have engaged with issues of fandom, gender and sexuality, ethnicity, and material life through a variety of pop cultural forms. Throughout the course, we will discuss theories of pop culture and analyze primary materials to understand the production and circulation of Chinese pop culture. This course is taught in English.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS201 Proseminar

This team-taught seminar, required of all majors in the College of East Asian Studies (CEAS), is for sophomores who have joined CEAS. It is also open to junior and senior CEAS majors who were unable to take the course their sophomore year. The course introduces majors to a range of the fields and methodologies that comprise East Asian studies at Wesleyan. The material will be organized into several disciplinary and area modules, each contributing to a central theme. For Spring 2017, the organizing theme is "Cooking, Consuming East Asia." The course will examine foodways as expressions of how societies in East Asia and beyond construct ("cook") their fluctuating identities and perform ("consume") them. Orientalism, food adventurism, gender roles, food nationalism, wartime diets, famines, conceptions of disgust, environmentalism, technology, and globalization will be some of the larger themes. Although we will discuss particular dishes and their histories as examples of socioeconomic dynamics, the focus of this course is on values, fears, and the cultural forces at play behind those culinary expressions.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

CEAS202 Narrating China: Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature

This course is a selective reading of important themes and texts in modern and contemporary Chinese literature by authors hailing from mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Southeast Asia, and Chinese borderlands like Tibet and Xinjiang. We examine how literary authors narrate China through its changes and heterogeneity throughout a tumultuous century, and we interrogate how China emerges in literature as a fluid concept with porous borders and heterogeneous elements. The course has a focus on narrative fiction, and topics explored in the course include modernization, gender relation, revolutions, diasporic culture, economic reform, and ethnic relations. This course assumes no prior knowledge of China or Chinese Language, and all texts will be taught using English translations.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS203 Faces of Korea

This course addresses multiple topics that span both traditional and modern Korean culture, ranging from traditional cuisine, dance, music, art, architecture, and the modernization of Korea in the 20th century to Korean films, social issues, religion, and the Korean Wave.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS204 Chinese Media in Chinese: Star, Fandom, and Identity

This course is conducted in Mandarin Chinese and designed to supplement the standard English-language Chinese Pop Culture (CEAS 181) course. The course will have two main foci: (1) introducing students to Chinese-language scholarship on Chinese media, particularly pop culture and its flow within East Asia, and (2) analyzing and discussing Chinese media in-depth in Mandarin Chinese.

Both advanced learners of Chinese (fourth-year level or above) and native speakers are welcome. All the reading materials will be in Mandarin Chinese, and we will have oral presentations in Chinese and some written work in English. Evaluation will be tailored to each student's language background. If you are unsure whether your language background is sufficient for the course, please contact the instructor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS205 Democracy and Social Movements in East Asia

Despite East Asia's reputation for acquiescent populations and weak civil society, the region has been replete with social movements. This course assesses the state of civil society in East Asia by surveying contemporary social movements in the region. We will examine the rise of civil society and its role in political and social changes in both authoritarian and democratic societies in East Asia.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CEAS
Identical With: GOVT281
Prereq: None

CEAS206 Korean Politics Through Film

This course explores the contemporary politics of Korea. Through course readings, films, and documentaries, we will examine how the tumultuous history of modern Korea has contributed to present political conditions in South and North Korea. Topics covered include Japanese colonialism, the Korean War, modernization, dictatorships, democratization, globalization, and inter-Korean relations.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CEAS
Identical With: GOVT295
Prereq: None

CEAS208 Modern Chinese Literature

This course introduces the history of modern Chinese literature from the republican era (early 20th-century) to the contemporary era. By discussing selected literary works, it serves an overview of the styles and features of modern Chinese literature in each time period and also introduces students to major themes from China's tumultuous 20th century. Topics will include the cultural transformations of the May Fourth movement, modernity, war, revolution, root-searching, and body writing. All readings will be in English translation.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS209 From the Goddess to the Feminist: Women in Chinese Literature and Visual Culture

This course examines representations of women in Chinese literature, painting, and music. It is organized around several Chinese cultural tropes of women and their historical contexts: from the goddess, the court lady, the literary gentry woman, the courtesan, and the female knight-errant in premodern Chinese culture, to the modern "new woman" and feminist. It also explores major themes associated with women in Chinese literature and culture: the relationship between gender and political power, self and society, individual and tradition, humans and the numinous realm. Tropes that persist through different periods will be used to chart changes in literary history. Students are encouraged to think about how these feminine tropes are formed in literary and pictorial conventions, as well as how they are reinvented over time. Whenever feasible, we will juxtapose representations of the same subjects by Chinese writers and writers from other traditions to think about the significance of the ways women are represented in different cultural traditions.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Identical With: FGSS219
Prereq: None

CEAS210 From Tea to Connecticut Rolls: Defining Japanese Culture Through Food

This course explores Japanese food traditions as a site in which cultural values are sought, contested, and disseminated for national consumption. Through an examination of various components of Japan's culinary practices such as the tea ceremony, sushi, whaling, and fusion cuisines, we uncover the aesthetics, religious beliefs, politics, environmental issues, and intercultural exchange that characterize Japanese history.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS211 The Greatest Chinese Novel: The Dream of the Red Chamber

THE DREAM OF THE RED CHAMBER (also known as THE STORY OF THE STONE) by Cao Xueqin (ca. 1715--1763) is widely recognized as the masterpiece of Chinese fiction. It is also a portal to Chinese civilization. Encyclopedic in scope, this book both sums up Chinese culture and asks of it difficult questions. Its cult status also accounts for modern popular screen and television adaptations. Through a close examination of this text in conjunction with supplementary readings and visual materials, this course will explore a series of topics on Chinese culture, including foundational myths; philosophical and religious systems; the status of fiction; conceptions of art and the artist; ideas about love, desire and sexuality; gender roles; garden aesthetics; family and clan structure; and definitions of sociopolitical order.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS213 The Chinese Canon and Its Afterlife

This course is an exploration of canonical works in Chinese literature, religious texts, historical narratives, art, and movies, with an emphasis on their aesthetic and cultural implications. Topics include Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism; folk religions and shamanism; cultural identity and self-cultivation; sexuality, cross-dressing, and gender politics; nature and utopias; emperors, scholars, and musicians; hermits and knights-errant; learned women poets and courtesans; drunken poets and Zen masters; fox spirits and ghosts; portraiture and representations of bodies; and secret societies and avant-garde artists. All readings are in translation. Although some Chinese characters will be introduced in calligraphy, no knowledge of Chinese is required.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS214 History and Geography

Maps are part of a broader family of value-laden images. This is a research seminar about the global history of cartography from 1490s to the recent past. We will study maps from the early modern and modern world and examine how maps were used as instruments of political power, shaped the imagination of peoples around the world, and inspired new ways to imagine our self-identity.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST399, ENVS399, SISP399
Prereq: None

CEAS215 The Legacy of World War II in Postwar Japan

In 1956, the Japanese Economic Planning Agency famously declared, "The 'postwar' is over." Indeed, by that time, the national economy had made a remarkable recovery since the end of World War II. Others place the end of the postwar with Emperor Hirohito's death in 1989. Still, was the postwar truly over for Japan? This seminar aims to tackle this dilemma of the postwar and assess how the war and the American occupation are remembered by the Japanese and how they continue to reverberate politically and culturally, sixty years after Japan regained its independence.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS216 Screening Japanese Modernity: Japanese History Through Film

The word "screening" is a double entendre. On the one hand, it simply refers to the fact that we will examine representation of Japanese modernity through the visual medium of film. But, more importantly, we will screen (problematizing/criticizing) the more orthodox understanding of Japanese modernity. Throughout the semester, we will discuss the relationship between the dominant historical narratives and their filmic representations and how these films often subvert these existing narratives.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS221 Introduction to Premodern Chinese Literature

This course is an introduction to premodern Chinese literature that focuses on the role Chinese literary texts have played in defining selfhood, creating self-image, and articulating the place of the individual in relation to community and state. The arrangement of the course is primarily chronological, from the first millennium BC to the end of the Qing Dynasty in 1911, though texts that cut across history are also juxtaposed to show differences and continuities from a larger perspective. The course contains canonical pieces of the Chinese literary tradition that address similar issues or respond to each other. Besides literary texts, painting, music, and material culture are also incorporated to help students visualize the tradition. Students are encouraged to think about the close relationship between Chinese literati's creation of self-image and political trauma they experienced during dynastic changes.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS222 History of Science and Technology in Modern China

Science, technology, and medicine played an integral role in the China's transition to modernity and inspired dramatic economic, social, and political transformations. As scholars of modern China developed a keen interest in transnational histories and comparative methodologies, they have paid closer attention to the histories of science, technology, and medicine. This course introduces students to this emerging field of study. It examines broad philosophical questions that motivate the research in history of those areas. We will learn to explore science, technology, and medicine in China on "its own terms" by understanding how the unique political and social challenges of modern China shaped Chinese science.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST386, SISP285
Prereq: None

CEAS223 History of Traditional China

This course introduces students to the history of China from ancient times to the middle of the Ming Dynasty, ca 1450. This is a period when China invented and reshaped its cultural identity by moving into new frontiers and creatively incorporating foreign ideas with indigenous practices. How did the Chinese and their neighbors understand what it meant to be a faithful spouse, self-sacrificing warrior, righteous official, or a loyal friend?
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST223
Prereq: None

CEAS224 Modern China: States, Transnations, Individuals, and Worlds

This course examines China's turbulent transition to modernity. It covers the Ming-Qing transition, Manchu conquest of central Eurasia, China's conflict and engagement with the West, birth of China's first republic, and the People's Republic of China under Mao Zedong, Deng Xiaoping, and his successors.

The dramatic transformation of China spanning the late 19th century to the present day is the focus of this course. The Chinese people today continue to deal with the legacy of these reforms, wars, and revolutions, as China's leaders and people dealt with unprecedented challenges. The three central themes of this course are (1) the reconstitution of (a somewhat) unified China after decades of political upheaval, (2) China's vulnerabilities in the face of domestic troubles and threats from abroad, and (3) the challenges of maintaining a high-growth economy with scarce resources.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST224
Prereq: None

CEAS225 Introduction to Chinese Poetry

This course explores various styles of traditional and modern Chinese poetry from the archaic period to the 21st century, with an emphasis on the range of ways in which poetry has been implicated, to a degree unknown in the West, in the political, spiritual, and aesthetic movements in China over the last three millennia. Topics include "The Book of Songs," "Nineteen Ancient Poems," the "Music Bureau" ballads, Six Dynasties poetry, the great Tang masters, the Song lyrics, women poets, and religious poets. Although some Chinese characters will be introduced in the unit on calligraphy, no knowledge of Chinese is required; all readings will be in English translation.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS229 Performing Indonesia

This course will examine the theater, dance, and puppetry of Indonesia in the context of its cultural significance in Indonesia and in the West. Students will read a variety of texts related to Indonesian history, myth, and religion. Students will also read books and essays by anthropologists Hildred Geertz, Clifford Geertz, and Margaret Mead to understand how the arts are integrated into the overall life of the island archipelago. Artifacts of physical culture will also be examined, including the palm-leaf manuscripts that are quoted in many performances; the paintings that depict the relationship between humans, nature, and the spirit world that are the subject of many plays; and the masks and puppets that often serve as a medium for contacting the invisible world of the gods and ancestors. Translations of Indonesian texts will be analyzed and adapted for performance. The direct and indirect influence of Indonesian performance and history on the West will be discussed by examining the work of theater artists such as Robert Wilson, Arianne Mnouchkine, Lee Breur, and Julie Taymour, who have all collaborated with Balinese performers.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-THEA
Identical With: THEA220, DANC220
Prereq: None

CEAS231 Introduction to Asian American Literature

This course surveys how Asia and Asian Americans have figured in the U.S. cultural imaginary from the middle of the 19th century to the present, from Herman Melville's American epic Moby-Dick to Ruth Ozeki's comic novel about transnational television, trade, and activism My Year of Meats. As the choice of these framing texts suggests, we will be exploring two kinds of representations. On the one hand, we will examine the narratives, tropes, and images through which dominant American culture has envisioned its incursions into Asia and the reciprocal movement of Asians into the United States; on the other, we will also explore the ways in which Asian Americans have sought to represent their own varied and uneven encounters with U.S. culture. The course is organized chronologically in order to emphasize the ways in which these cultural artifacts reflect and influence their social and historical contexts. In the latter half of the course, as we enter the period beginning with the 1970s in which Asian American literature becomes an institutional category in its own right, we will add to this historical framework a number of other analytical frames that have emerged from within Asian American Studies itself: cultural nationalism; gender and sexuality; postcoloniality; cultural assimilation; and globalization.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL230, AMST264
Prereq: None

CEAS232 Introduction to Chinese Film

This course introduces contemporary Chinese cinema in both national and international senses. We will learn the basics of film history in the PRC, Taiwan, and Hong Kong through four major genres: family melodrama, martial arts, action, and musical. Our engagement with these selected films will provide insights into fundamental issues such as family, history, nationalism, transnationalism, identity, gender, and sexuality. The goal of this course is to demonstrate how Chinese cinema has developed in the PRC, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and transnationally and to refine students' abilities to analyze and write about film critically.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-FILM
Prereq: None

CEAS233 Transnational China: Writing and Screening Chinese Immigration

Migration is a crucial issue for centuries, and people move around the world involuntarily or voluntarily due to political force, economy, technology, and globalization. Chinese immigration to the world has its long history, and the dispersion of Chinese populations has contributed to the formation of Chinese-speaking sites globally and brought about the construction of Sinophone culture in various geographical locales.

This course will introduce the discourse of the Sinophone, a linguistic-oriented term that defines cultural productions with Sinitic languages in Chinese-speaking sites around the world and its relation to Chinese immigration, transnationalism, and heterogeneity. The critical questions we will explore in this course include (1) What is the relationship between the Sinophone (roughly, Chinese language users) and China, Chineseness, Chinese diaspora, and overseas Chinese studies? (2) What is China in the lens of Chinese immigrants? (3) How do cultural producers represent Chinese immigrants' lived experiences? We will read novels/novellas and watch films from writers and filmmakers who have experienced diverse migratory trajectories to get a picture of how they represent Chinese immigrants' identity formation and negotiation with local societies, as well as their roots of origin/homeland. Through reading scholarship on Sinophone and primary texts, students will understand the relationship between physical migration and cultural production and become acquainted with various forms of place-based cultural productions in three Sinophone spheres, including the United States, Taiwan, and Malaysia.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS235 Desire, Theatricality, and the Self in Chinese Literature

This course will introduce students to some of the most important themes in Chinese literature and culture, including desire and transgression, self-dramatization, dream and illusion, and magical transformation. We will focus on the long 17th century, from the mid-16th century to the end of the 17th century, one of the watersheds in Chinese culture and literary sensibility. The period witnessed the rise of radical subjectivity, a reassessment of authoritative traditions, indulgence in emotions and sensuous existence, and shifting boundaries between refinement and vulgarity. We will survey a wide range of writings from this period, discussing such issues as theatrical aesthetics, the creation of a world through desire and imagination, and a new sense of an "I" in 17th-century China. By focusing on this period, we can put Chinese literary tradition and this extraordinarily creative period into dialogue and understand continuities and radical changes, the formation of tradition and its transformation.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS241 Visualizing Japanese-ness: Transnational Cinema in Modern Japan

This course is designed to interrogate evolving notions of transnationalism in Japanese cinema, from the prewar avant-garde to the postcolonial present. We will use the assigned films and supplementary readings as a means to explore concepts of Japanese nationalism and uniqueness (nihonjinron), colonial memory, hybridity, multiculturalism, neoliberalism, and creolization, among others. We will then use this theoretical foundation to analyze representations of Japanese minority groups (such as zainichi Koreans) to inquire into the possibility of obtaining a transnational or hybrid identity in the global era. How do these films "visualize" Japanese and/or transnational identity, and are these visions seen as compatible? In what ways and to what extent are these films engaged in a dialogue with theoretical concepts of postcoloniality and ethnicity?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS242 Buddhism: An Introduction

This course explores the entire range of the Buddhist tradition, from its origins in the Ganges valley of India, through its evolutions in Southeast Asia, Central Asia, China, Tibet, Korea and Japan, culminating in its encounter with the Western world and the contributions it is currently making to global civilization. We look at important Buddhist texts, trace the development of its key doctrines, explore the range of its practices, examine its major figures, and investigate its various forms of community.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RELI
Identical With: RELI242
Prereq: None

CEAS244 Delicious Movement: Time Is Not Even, Space Is Not Empty

This course contemplates metaphorical nakedness and human and bodily experiences of time and space through interdisciplinary discourse. Taught by NYC-based artist Eiko Otake of Eiko & Koma, students will examine how being or becoming a mover reflects and alters each person's relationships with the environment, with history, and with other beings. Topics of study and discussion include Eiko & Koma's body of works, atomic bomb literature, postwar Japan, and environmental violence such as Fukushima nuclear explosions. Aeky concept of study will be metaphorical nakedness and how distance is malleable.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Identical With: DANC244
Prereq: None

CEAS245 Constructions and Re-Constructions of Buddhism

Is Buddhism a philosophy? A mind science? An ancient mystical path? A modern construct? This seminar will evaluate a variety of answers to these questions by exploring how Buddhism has been understood in colonial and postcolonial periods. Our primary-source materials include Orientalist poetry, Zen essays, Insight Meditation manuals, 21st-century films, and contemporary academic critiques. We will examine the shape Buddhism takes in these works and turn to recent scholarship to discuss how romantic, imperialist, anti-modern, nationalist, therapeutic, and scientific frames depict one of today's most popular religions.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: RELI483
Prereq: None

CEAS250 Economy of Japan

This is a course designed for students who have taken ECON110 or ECON101 but have yet to take ECON302. It has two specific goals. First, students will learn (or review) the basic knowledge of macroeconomic theory as well as the basic tools of data analysis in Excel. Second, students will apply these tools to understand Japan's macroeconomic and financial history from the mid-19th century to the present, including the industrialization of Japan, prewar instability, postwar recovery, and Heisei Recession.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ECON
Identical With: ECON262
Prereq: ECON101 OR ECON110

CEAS251 Macroeconomic History of Japan

This course will use modern macroeconomics and economic history of Japan to shed some light on important questions in macroeconomics. Students will read empirical macroeconomics research not only on Japanese economy but also on the United States and other countries to develop a sense of empirical research in macroeconomics. The course will also emphasize the major developments of macroeconomic policy in Japan since the Meiji Restoration to appreciate the role of history in understanding contemporary macroeconomic policy debates.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ECON
Identical With: ECON362
Prereq: ECON302

CEAS253 Practicum in Exhibition of East Asian Art

This course is a historical, theoretical, and practical introduction to the exhibition of East Asian art, both in the west and in China and Korea. Students will learn the history of exhibition in China and the establishment of collections of East Asian art in the United States, modes of exhibition, and current practices through readings, presentations, and practical experience with the collection at The Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies, as well as site visits to local collections and museums.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Identical With: ANTH253
Prereq: None

CEAS254 Breaking the Waves: The Japanese and French New Wave Cinemas and Their Legacy

While the French and Japanese New Wave(s) existed as largely contemporaneous cinematic movements, rarely are they discussed together, instilling the impression of two parallel streams, never to converge or intersect. This course hopes to serve as an intervention into this perceived divide through close readings of these groundbreaking cinematic works and an examination of their revolutionary content in the interest of articulating shared philosophical concerns. In many cases, New Wave filmmakers worked as writers and critics before producing films themselves, a fact that speaks to the intensely theoretical nature of their cinema. This course will therefore examine critical writings published in the space of Cahiers du Cinema, Film Art, and other journals as a means of better understanding the thought process that underlies these films. How do these films figure as a response to that of the previous generation and how did they hope to revolutionize cinematic praxis? What was their relationship to political activism and the events of 1968? Finally, we will consider the legacy of these cinemas: What is the prevailing influence of the New Wave on Hollywood and global cinema? What aspects of the movement have been retained and what has been lost along the way?
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Identical With: FIST254
Prereq: None

CEAS255 Irreducible Distance: Japan-Korea Relations through Literature and Visual Media

Despite physical proximity and shared cultural origins, the specter of imperialism and constant influence of economic competition has seemingly resigned Japan and South Korea as two nations that remain forever "close and yet so far." Beginning with the colonial period (1910--1945) and ending with the current day, this course examines works of literature and visual media from both the Japan and Korea sides that address issues of intercultural relations and communication. What position does Japan for Korea and Korea for Japan occupy in the cultural imagination and how has this image shifted since the end of the colonial period? What role does Japan have in the formation of the North Korean state and articulation of ideology? How do political developments and ongoing issues of war responsibility (e.g., comfort women) continue to dictate the state of Korea-Japan relations? This course will also examine the influence of peripheral spaces (such as Jeju Island) and marginalized groups (such as the Korean minority in Japan) have in mediating discourse between these nations. Finally, recent cinematic works such as Assassination (2015) and Spirits' Homecoming (2016) have witnessed a rekindled interest in the colonial period. We will thus discuss how these films constitute an effort to reexamine and reconstruct these historical events and how they view them as relevant to an understanding of the present day.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS256 Neo-Confucian Chinese Philosophy

This course will present critical discussion of issues central to Neo-Confucian (11th--19th centuries CE) philosophers that in many cases are still central in Chinese thought today. Topics will include the relation between knowledge and action, Neo-Confucian conceptions of idealism and materialism, and the connection between Neo-Confucian philosophy and spirituality.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-PHIL
Identical With: PHIL259, RELI206
Prereq: None

CEAS258 Comparative Philosophy

This seminar will explore the substantive and methodological issues that arise when one takes seriously the idea that philosophy has been, and continues to be, practiced within multiple traditions of inquiry, in many different ways, and in many different languages. We will examine and critique some of the ways in which "comparison" has been used, as well as examine arguments that comparison across traditions is, in fact, impossible. Although most of our attention will be focused on written academic research, we will also attend to the challenges and benefits of interacting directly with philosophers in other countries and cultures.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM368, PHIL337
Prereq: None

CEAS259 Popular Music in Contemporary China

As in the rest of the world, popular music dominates contemporary China's music industry and consumption. Yet China's popular music market also presents unique issues of state-sponsored popular culture intersecting with the bottom-up popular taste and desire, the repressive collective "we" intersecting with the resilient individual "I" in artistic expressions, and the imagined "ancient China" intersecting with the modern sound and technology. This course offers an opportunity for students to explore aesthetic, political, and cultural meanings contained in popular music through in-depth research projects on a number of important pop musicians and bands in Reform China from the 1980s to the present. Writing at the university level will be emphasized through the written assignments.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-MUSC
Identical With: MUSC127
Prereq: None

CEAS260 From Archipelago to Nation State: An Introduction to Japanese History and Culture

How did a string of islands on the eastern edge of Eurasian landmass become today's Japan, an economic and cultural superpower? Starting with prehistoric times, this course looks as how the early cultures and peoples on the Japanese archipelago coalesce to become "Japan" for the first time in the late seventh century and how those cultures and peoples adopt new identities, systems of power relations and economies up to the present. This course reveals the big picture, but to understand it, the factual pixels that constitute it are examined in some detail. Students are expected to think of the course as comprehensive in the same way as mathematics or a language course.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST260
Prereq: None

CEAS261 Classical Chinese Philosophy

Topics in this critical examination of issues debated by the early Confucian, Daoist, and Mohist philosophers will include the nature of normative authority and value, the importance of ritual, and the relation between personal and social goods.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-PHIL
Identical With: PHIL205, RELI228
Prereq: None

CEAS262 Human Rights Across Cultures

Are human rights universal? Do cultural differences matter to judgments about human rights? We will look at the current international human rights institutional framework and at theoretical perspectives from Europe and America, China, and the Islamic world. We will look primarily at philosophical materials but will also pay some attention to the premises of international legal documents like the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and to the assumptions behind activist organizations such as Amnesty International.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PHIL
Identical With: PHIL272
Prereq: None

CEAS263 China's Economic Transformation

China is a country that is both transitioning to a market-oriented economy and developing rapidly into a global economic power. As such, it has characteristics of both an emerging market economy and a developing country. China is large enough to create its own institutional infrastructure to support a third way between capitalism and socialism. This course examines in detail China's great economic transformation beginning in 1978 in what is often described as a "gradualist" transition to market economy. In the past three decades, the speed of China's development and its growth rates of GDP are without precedent in history. The course concludes by addressing the incompleteness of China's transition to a mature, developed market economy and by probing the issue of what is left to be done to create a harmonious society.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ECON
Identical With: ECON263
Prereq: ECON110 OR ECON101

CEAS265 Japan Since 1868: Society and Culture in Modern Japanese History

This course examines the history of Japan from roughly 1800 to the present. With a broad-ranging observation covering politics, economy, society, culture, and foreign relations, we will look at a variety of historical events that the Japanese people experienced. Our goal is not only to understand what happened when, but also to be concerned with how people at different historical stages saw the world around them. Major historical events, trends, ideas, and people will constitute the vital part of the course; however, we will also inquire into everyday life of ordinary people, whose names do not remain in historical records. We will use a wide range of materials including written sources available in the English language, films, literature, and comics.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST207
Prereq: None

CEAS268 Music and Modernity in China, Japan, and Korea

This course examines the relationships between music and modernity in China, Japan, and Korea and the interactions between the impact of Western music and nationalism and contemporary cultural identities. In particular, it explores the historical significance of the Meiji restoration on Japanese music tradition; the Japanese influence on Chinese school songs; the origins of contemporary music in China, Japan, and Korea; the adaptation and preservation of traditional music genres; and the rise of popular music and the music industry. We will focus on the cultural conflicts encountered by East Asian musicians and composers and their musical explorations and experiments in searching for national and individual identities in the processes of nation-building and modernization. The course aims to provide knowledge on East Asian music genres, insight on the issues of global/local cultural contacts, and a better understanding of music's central role in political and social movements in 20th-century East Asia.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-MUSC
Identical With: MUSC261
Prereq: None

CEAS269 Chinese Cities

More than half of China's population now resides in cities. Within the next few years, China plans to accelerate the rate of urbanization by building sprawling cities and relocating more people into urban areas.

This course explores the history of Chinese cities from the imperial to modern age. Cities were centers of commerce, intellectual activity, and, in the words of historian and political scientist David Strand, "storehouses of political technique, strategy, and sentiment open to anyone with the understanding and the will to inventory to exploit them." We will study how cities supported massive populations with limited resources, inspired new forms of social organization, and transformed the political and social order of China.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST117
Prereq: None

CEAS271 Political Economy of Developing Countries

This course explores the political economy of development, with a special focus on poverty reduction. We discuss the meaning of development, compare Latin American to East Asian development strategies (focusing on Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, South Korea, and Taiwan), examine poverty-reduction initiatives in individual countries (including Bangladesh, Chile, and Tanzania), and evaluate approaches to famine prevention and relief. Throughout the course, we pay close attention to the role of procedural democracy, gender relations, market forces, and public action in promoting or inhibiting development.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: GOVT271, LAST271
Prereq: None

CEAS272 Disease and Health in Modern Asia

While this course might seem highly focused and specialized at first glance, it is intended for students of all majors and backgrounds. It has two main goals. The first is to explore the influence of epidemics and diseases more broadly over the course of East Asian history while keeping a global context in mind. The focus is on China and Japan, but Korea will be included when possible. The second is to consider how historically, diseases and epidemics are best understood through multiple disciplinary approaches, including biology, epidemiology, anthropology, sociology, and iconcology. Colonialism and empire--both Western and Japanese--are, of course, underlying themes throughout. We will examine several important historiographical and methodological approaches as well as some basic issues in the history of science and some important examples of specific diseases such as cholera, tuberculosis, and plague from different approaches using both secondary and primary sources.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST370, SISP370
Prereq: None

CEAS273 Art of China and Japan: Ritual Bronzes to Zen Gardens

This course surveys major modes and styles of artistic representation and expression in East Asia, with a focus on China and Japan. Because of the extraordinary early influence of Chinese civilization on its East Asian neighbors, we will consider not only the impact of religion, thought, and socialeconomic force on the arts of each country but also patterns of reception and transformation. Major topics include literati painting, calligraphy, pictorial carving and sculpture, court art, Zen Buddhism, ceramics, and woodblock prints.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARHA279
Prereq: None

CEAS274 Modern East Asia: Continuities and Discontinuities in the Global Context

This course is an introduction to East Asian civilization, as well as to ways through which one can examine and understand the historical roots of current affairs in and related to East Asia. The course will help students to explore not only the dramatic changes in politics, culture, and society during the past centuries, but also their impact on people's lives in contemporary East Asia. We will learn how to use various sources, such as official documents, biographical literature, films, newspapers and magazines, to study three major themes: (1) changes and continuity in modern East Asia (with a focus on historical, social, and cultural aspects); (2) interactions between East Asian countries; and (3) East Asia in the world (with a focus on the encounters between East Asia and the West).
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST225
Prereq: None

CEAS276 Art in Taiwan Under Japan

This course introduces the art of Taiwan under the Japanese rule (1895--1945). During this period Taiwan experienced profound social and cultural changes that, on the one hand, transformed Taiwan from a land of outcasts to the frontier of modernization in East Asia, and, on the other hand, forced the inhabitants on the island to assume a colonial identity. By examining major works in painting, sculpture, architecture, and public monuments produced by Taiwanese artists or the Japanese authority, we will examine the various roles of visual art in the negotiation between modernity and colonialism, self-identity, and cultural affiliation. Specific topics explored in this course include the making and remaking of the idealized images of Taiwanese women as opposed to modern womanhood, the appropriation of Western modernism filtered through Japanese interpretations, the searching of Taiwan's local image encouraged by the Japanese colonial authority, and the cultural and political relativity adopted by Taiwanese artists sandwiched between China and Japan. The ultimate goal of this course is to offer contextualized understanding about the art and culture of Taiwan during the colonial period.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARHA276
Prereq: None

CEAS277 Art of Dissidents and Recluses: Chinese Literati Painting and Calligraphy

During the mid-11th century, a group of Chinese dissidents and recluses, known for their independent views on political and social issues, began to explore new forms of artistic expression. The results of their effort challenged the status quo in Chinese art and eventually developed into a unique tradition, known as literati art. The tradition left a strong imprint in Chinese culture today and its impact can also be felt throughout East Asia, especially Korea and Japan. This course examines this artistic tradition and its legacy in today's China and East Asia.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARHA282
Prereq: None

CEAS278 Gender and Sexuality in Chinese Narrative

This course pays particular attention to gender relations and representations of sexuality in Chinese narrative. This course will require close readings of translated Chinese novels, short stories and movies. We will explore themes and motifs such as gender roles in Confucianism, female chastity, same sex desire, cross-dressing, masculinity and femininity, manhood and misogyny, eroticism, the cult of qing (passion), the New Woman, socialist and post-socialist desires, and writing bodies in the era of globalization. In addition to providing a platform for appreciation of the aesthetic beauty of Chinese narrative, the course encourages students to think about how representations of gender and sexuality incorporate or confront the mainstream moral values and social principles in China.

All readings are in English, no prior knowledge of Chinese language or culture is required. No text book requirement.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Identical With: FGSS288
Prereq: None

CEAS279 The Making of Modern Japan, 1500 to Present

In a global context, Japan emerged as a major player on the world stage after 1500. While in the midst of what later was called the Warring States Period (sometimes dated 1468--1600), Japanese traders and others maintained a broad network of commerce that included not only Korea and China but spread to Southeast Asia. Europeans first reached Japan in 1543, and it was soon obvious that no European state had the military might to colonize Japan. These are the roots from which a modern Japan appeared that in the 19th and early 20th centuries militarized and set upon an imperial project until defeated at war in 1945. Since then, Japan has emerged as a postmodern, highly technological, pop culture-oriented, and aging country. One theme that will be examined across the semester is environmental change over the long term.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST279
Prereq: None

CEAS280 Losers of World War II

This course explores the experiences of Germany and Japan in the postwar era. These countries faced the dual challenge of making political transitions to democratic government and recovering from the economic ruin of World War II. Japan and Germany both were occupied and rebuilt by the United States, and both were blamed for the devastation of the war. How did Japan and Germany respond to being cast as worldwide villains? How strong were the democracies that developed? This course explores these questions by comparing the culture, history, and institutions of these two countries.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: GOVT285
Prereq: None

CEAS283 Beyond the Great Wave: Japanese Art and Visual Culture

Japanese art has been successfully taking, transforming, and incorporating diverse cultural elements form various traditions into its own visual vocabulary. At the same time, the traditional arts of Japan continue to inspire contemporary artists and designers around the world. This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to Japanese art from the ancient period to the present day. We will consider a range of visual media in the context of Japanese literature, history, and religion. We will examine how Japanese art has developed and changed through the ages, and how it has interacted with other artistic traditions. The course will consider both 3D (sculpture and architecture) and 2D (narrative scrolls and screens) media, and will take advantage of the DAC print collection, where we will work with original woodcut prints by artists such as Hokusai.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARHA283
Prereq: None

CEAS288 Arts of Zen in East Asia

Zen, a school of Buddhism that originated in China and later spread to Japan and Korea, is considered a gateway to East Asian thought and a force that challenges modern materialism. The nature of abstraction, spirituality, and enlightenment can best be approached through the arts associated with this religious school, which include ink painting, calligraphy, ceramics, architecture, and garden design. In this course, we will discuss how the ideas of Zen were elucidated in the visual arts by looking at major works from the 13th through the 20th centuries. We will also examine the ways in which artworks were incorporated in the practice of Zen rituals, especially those related to meditation and the tea ceremony. In addition, we will explore the meanings of pictorial and literary ko'an and how they form visual and textual riddles based on allusion and wordplay. Through a comparative approach, we will analyze the development in the form, style, and iconography of Zen art in East Asia, while tracing the history of Zen Buddhism and its underpinning philosophical concepts related to enlightenment, emptiness, and beauty. The goal of this course is to form an in-depth appreciation for the arts of Zen in their historical, philosophical, and cultural context.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARHA277, RELI277
Prereq: None

CEAS289 Buddhist Temple Art of China

Buddhism was one of the most important sources of artistic inspiration in China. From the religion's early introduction to the northwestern regions of China in the third century CE, cave-chapels and temples were constructed and their walls were painted with images of Buddhist deities and paradise scenes as visual aids in ritual practices. Statues and sculptures in all sorts of media were also made as objects of veneration in temple halls. As Buddhism was assimilated into Chinese culture, Buddhist art began to manifest traditional Chinese belief systems, visual preferences, and even moral teachings. Focusing on major cave sites and temple compounds, this course examines the development of artistic programs and styles at different stages of Buddhism's absorption into the religious life and material culture in China.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARHA289
Prereq: None

CEAS290 Unearthing Early China: Art and Archaeology

This course introduces early China by examining major archaeological discoveries from prehistory through the second century CE. We will analyze the formal and material features of early Chinese artifacts from important archaeological excavations at sites such as Liangzhu, Anyang, Zhouyuan, and Mancheng. We will discuss the ways in which these artifacts and archaeological sites demonstrate early Chinese cosmological beliefs and ritual practices, especially notions related to heaven, afterlife, and the transition from ancestor worship to the pursuit of personal welfare in immortality. In addition, we will study the iconography and symbolism of objects found in these archaeological discoveries, which would serve as a foundation for the inception of visual arts in the later periods of Chinese history.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Identical With: ARHA281, ARCP290
Prereq: None

CEAS295 In Search of the Good Life in Premodern Japan

This course presents works of literature from premodern Japan to consider how people conceptualized and struggled to attain the good life. How did people's evocations of their ideals and desires reflect and engage with the historical reality? How did their social status (such as a Buddhist monk, samurai, or a lady-in-waiting), occupation, and gender contribute to their aspirations as well as struggles? What were their strategies for not just survival but for fulfillment in periods of warfare or disasters? Works will encompass diary literature, essays, fiction, and poems from a variety of authors across most of Japanese premodern history. Practices such as the tea ceremony and works of art will also be discussed to fill out the cultural context.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS296 Politics in Japan

This introductory course in politics in Japan begins with an overview of the Japanese political system: its historical origins, institutional structures, and main actors. The course then moves on to explore specific policy areas: industrial and financial policy, labor and social policy, and foreign policy. The course culminates in student research projects presented in an academic conference format of themed panels.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: GOVT296
Prereq: None

CEAS297 Politics and Political Development in the People's Republic of China

Despite the collapse of the U.S.S.R. and Eastern European Communist regimes since 1989, the People's Republic of China (P.R.C.) has retained a one-party regime while it continues its economic reforms begun in 1978, before reforms in other communist counties got under way. In contrast with former communist regimes, the P.R.C. is attempting socialist market reforms while retaining the people's democratic dictatorship under the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party. We will examine the politics of this anomaly, study several public policy areas, and evaluate the potential for China's democratization.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: GOVT297
Prereq: None

CEAS299 Politics and Security in Asia

Are the countries of East and Southeast Asia headed toward greater cooperation or toward increased conflict? This course assesses political and security conflict and cooperation in the post--Cold War era in China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and Southeast Asia. The first part of the course introduces the theoretical issues at stake and reviews the historical backgrounds of the countries involved. The second part analyzes contemporary political and security issues, including territorial disputes over islands in the South China Sea, tensions between China and Taiwan, Japan's security policy, conflict on the Korean peninsula, arms control, international organizations, and bilateral and multilateral relations. The last part of the course outlines potential future scenarios for security and cooperation within Asia and between the countries of Asia and the rest of the world.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: GOVT299
Prereq: None

CEAS300 Literatures of the Japanese Empire

This course will survey select works of literature that were produced during Japan's Imperial period, in disparate locations across the Empire (including Korea, Taiwan, and the 'home islands' of Japan itself). It will also grapple with literary reflections on the experience of Empire, penned in the wake of Japan's defeat in 1945. We will conceive of 'literature' broadly, including under this heading not only texts in the traditional sense, but other forms of media, as well. By considering a selection of texts from this period, we will strive to attend to some of the contested and competing desires of individuals and entities seeking to navigate conditions of empire, colonialism, and war.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS301 Modern China and the World Since 1945

This class will tackle key international problems in modern China's history over the past 70 years, beginning with the civil war; the Korean war; the Great Leap Forward; the Cultural Revolution; Deng Xiaoping's economic reform; Tiananmen 1989; Hong Kong's reversion to the PRC; democratization movements in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan; and cross-strait relations over the years. We will explore China's recent assertiveness on territorial issues, as well as the reaction over time to Chinese foreign policy by the United States, Russia, Japan, India, and other key players.

In addition to lectures and discussion, we will engage in some role-playing, with students taking various national and bureaucratic positions in mock negotiations and international exchanges. The goal will be to gain a better understanding both of Chinese options and the role of international players during key moments in modern China's history.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS304 Environmental Politics and Democratization

This course explores the role that environmental movements and organizations play in the development and transformation of democratic politics. It examines the political role of environmental movements in nondemocracies, transitioning democracies, and advanced democracies.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: GOVT304, ENVS304
Prereq: None

CEAS308 The Jewish Experience in China: From Kaifeng in the Song Dynasty to Shanghai During the Holocaust

This course provides a historical and analytical overview of the Jewish presence in China from the Silk Road trade through the Holocaust, as well as the rebirth of Jewish identity among the Chinese Jews in Kaifeng today. Students will be encouraged to do comparative readings on Jewish survival and assimilation in different cultural contexts ranging from India to Europe.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST308
Prereq: None

CEAS311 Representing China

This course will introduce perspectives that anthropologists, ethnographers, writers, filmmakers, artists, and photographers have taken to understand contemporary social life in China. Students will learn to differentiate the strengths and weaknesses of each perspective and, at the same time, will develop their own nuanced appreciation for Chinese culture and recent Chinese history. Beginning with basic concepts of family and family relationships, we will survey gift giving and banqueting, changes in the role and status of women, education, organization of the workplace, rituals, festivals, and changes since the beginning of the reform and opening up in the early 1980s. Anthropological essays and ethnographies will be supplemented by short stories, first-person narratives, and class presentations of films, photographs, and art-works to illuminate the different ways that natives and foreigners represent Chinese culture. Lectures will provide cultural and historical context for these materials. No previous knowledge of China or Chinese is required for this class.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: ANTH311
Prereq: None

CEAS338 Comparative Political Philosophy

Undertaking "comparative philosophy" means to do philosophy by drawing on multiple philosophical traditions. In this course, we will study key topics in political philosophy, such as the justification of political authority, the legitimacy of public critique of social rituals, and the scope of liberty and rights-from both modern Western and contemporary East Asian perspectives. We will examine potential obstacles to comparative theorizing, as well as benefits that can arise both for currently dominant traditions (e.g., Western liberalism) and for alternatives to liberalism such as Chinese and Korean Confucianism.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PHIL
Identical With: PHIL338
Prereq: None

CEAS340 Reading Theories

In this survey of theories that have shaped the reading of literature and the analysis of culture, emphasis is on key concepts--language, identity, subjectivity, gender, power, and knowledge--and on key figures and schools such as Marx, Freud, Nietzsche, Saussure, Barthes, Gramsci, Benjamin, Althusser, Foucault, Lacan, Deleuze, Jameson, postmodernism, and U.S. feminism.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL295, COL339, CCIV393, FIST290, GRST231, RUSS340, RULE340, REES340
Prereq: None

CEAS343 Tibetan Buddhism: From Ancient India to Shangri-la

This seminar will explore the philosophies and practices of Tibetan Buddhism as well as the ways Tibetan Buddhism has been mythologized by Tibetans and non-Tibetans alike. We will begin with a review of Indian Buddhism, placing particular emphasis on Tantric thought and practices. We will then focus on the subsequent development and core practices of Tibetan Buddhism's key schools, drawing on careful analyses of histories, myths, biographies, and religious discourses. Finally, we will explore the ways in which Tibet and Tibetan Buddhism have been mythologized in the minds of Westerners and others. We will pay especial attention to the intersection of these imaginings with contemporary Tibetan nationalist movements to apply our insights to the analysis of present-day realities. Readings will draw from primary Buddhist texts, histories, autobiographies, and scholarly journals and will be complemented by in-class film screenings.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: RELI229
Prereq: None

CEAS344 Religions of China: The Ways and Their Power

In this course, we examine the religious worlds of China from antiquity to the present. Not only will we read key works of Chinese philosophy from the Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist traditions, we will also investigate how these traditions find expression in art and architecture, poetry and prose, and in the lived realities of Chinese history.

In this exploration of Chinese religions, we will pay special attention to the question of what "counts" as religion, to the role of the state in defining and establishing Chinese religions, and to the power of new religious movements to intervene dramatically (and sometimes violently) in Chinese history.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RELI
Identical With: RELI232
Prereq: None

CEAS345 Ethics and Action in the Buddhist Cosmos

We often think about nirvana, or "enlightenment," as the ultimate goal of Buddhist practice. But the reality is much more complex. Buddhist traditions imagine a huge range of positive outcomes for moral behavior: immediate material benefits, rebirth in a better body or in a wealthier family, and enjoyment of gold-paved heavens or eternally blissful Pure Lands.

In this seminar we will read Buddhist scriptures, commentaries, biographies, narrative anthologies, and scholarly works that trace the many ways of thinking about ethics, action, and rebirth in the vast Buddhist cosmos. We will tour Buddhist heavens and hells, Pure Lands and political dystopias, as well as the complex worlds of Buddhist modernity. Along the way we will begin to think about key issues in the study of religion: narrative and ethics, magic and material culture, cosmology and sacred presence, modernity and globalization.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: RELI315
Prereq: None

CEAS346 Contemporary East Asian Cinema

This is a seminar on comparative narrative and stylistic analysis that focuses on contemporary films from Hong Kong, Taiwan, China, South Korea, and Japan, regions that have produced some of the most exciting commercial and art cinema in the past 30 years. We will begin by examining the basic narrative and stylistic principles at work in the films, then broaden the scope of our inquiry to compare the aesthetics of individual directors. The films of Wong Kar-wai, Tsai Ming-liang, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Kitano Takeshi, Kore-eda Hirokazu, Wang Xiaoshuai, Tian Zhuangzhuang, Johnnie To, Stephen Chiau, Hong Sang-soo, Tsui Hark, Lu Chuan, and others will be featured.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-FILM
Identical With: FILM346
Prereq: (FILM304 AND FILM307)

CEAS350 Women and Buddhism

This seminar will seek to investigate the complex and changing status of women in relationship to Buddhist doctrine and practice. Using Buddhist texts that present traditional views of women as well as a variety of contemporary materials that reveal aspects of the lives of Buddhist women in ancient and contemporary times, we will attempt to understand the values and concerns that drive, restrain, and/or empower such women.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: RELI350, FGSS264
Prereq: [RELI242 or CEAS242] OR RELI151

CEAS355 Between Asia and Asian America

In this seminar, we will critically examine the relationship between East Asia and Asian America, and explore the disjunction and connection between the two as geopolitical entities, historical concepts, academic fields, and sites of cultural expressions and political identity. Inquiring into key issues such as colonization, diaspora, race and ethnicity, Pacific and the transpacific, etc., this seminar seeks productive engagement between the disciplines without erasing their differences.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Identical With: AMST355
Prereq: None

CEAS362 Sumi-e Painting II

Sumi-e Painting II is an advanced class for which Introduction to Sumi-e Painting (ARST 260) is a prerequisite. In this course, foundation techniques will be expanded upon. We will re-examine traditional techniques and composition, and there will be exploration of new contemporary techniques. There will also be experimentation with tools beyond the brush. This course will introduce a concept based approach to narrative and content. Students will be encouraged to develop a personal style and method.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARST362
Prereq: ARST260

CEAS381 Relic and Image: The Archaeology and Social History of Indian Buddhism

This course investigates the social history and material culture of Indian Buddhism from the fifth century BCE through the period of the Kushan empire (1st--3rd century CE). The course begins with the examination of the basic teachings of Buddhism as presented in canonical texts and then turns to consideration of the organization and functioning of the early Buddhist community, or sangha. The focus then shifts to the popular practice of Buddhism in early India and the varied forms of interaction between lay and monastic populations. Although canonical texts will be examined, primary emphasis in this segment of the course is given to the archaeology and material culture of Buddhist sites and their associated historical inscriptions. Specific topics to be covered include the cult of the Buddha's relics, pilgrimage to the sites of the Eight Great Events in the Buddha's life, the rise and spread of image worship, and the Buddhist appropriation and reinterpretation of folk religious practices. Key archaeological sites to be studied include the monastic complex at Sanchi, the pilgrimage center at Bodh Gaya (site of the Buddha's enlightenment), the city of Taxila (capital of the Indo-Greek kings and a major educational center), and the rock-cut cave monasteries along the trade routes of western India.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARHA381, ARCP380, RELI375
Prereq: None

CEAS384 Japan's Nuclear Disasters

The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 are central to the history of the 20th century. This course examines the scientific, cultural, and political origins of the bombs; their use in the context of aerial bombings and related issues in military history; the decisions to use them; the human cost to those on whom they were dropped; and their place in history, culture, and identity politics to the present. Sources will include works on the history of science; military, political, and cultural history; literary and other artistic interpretations; and a large number of primary source documents, mostly regarding U.S. policy questions. In addition, we will be examining the development of the civilian nuclear industry in Japan with a focus on the nuclear meltdowns in Fukushima and other accidents. This is an extremely demanding course.

This interdisciplinary, experiential, and experimental course combines studio learning (movement studies and interdisciplinary, creative exploration) and seminars (presentations and discussions). No previous dance or movement study is required, and the course is not particularly geared toward dancers or performers. However, your willingness to experiment on and share movement is important. We encourage you to think about movement as a method of accessing human experiences and making distance malleable, a way to explore your own sensations, thoughts, and reactions in learning history.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST381, SISP381, DANC381, ENVS381
Prereq: None

CEAS385 Legacies of Authoritarian Politics

This course explores the challenges and legacies faced by new democracies due to their authoritarian pasts. To examine legacies of authoritarian politics, we will first study the key features of authoritarian vs. democratic states. The second part will look at "life after dictatorship" including authoritarian successor parties, political participation, civic engagement, and policing in the post-authoritarian era.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CEAS
Identical With: GOVT391
Prereq: None

CEAS390 Politics and Society in Japanese Women's Writing

How have some of modern Japan's most celebrated and insightful authors responded to key events and social conditions in contemporary Japan? What sorts of perspectives have these authors brought to issues of industrial pollution, or to youth crime and social change under capitalism, or to ongoing crises in Okinawa and Fukushima? This course seeks to hear the voices of these authors--and the social actors with whom they engage--by grappling with key modern Japanese literary texts in English translation.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Identical With: FGSS390
Prereq: None

CEAS395 The Question of the Everyday in Modern Japan

What do we mean when we talk about 'the everyday'? Thinkers like Tosaka Jun and Henri Lefebvre teach us that the everyday is above all a realm of practice, a space of conflict within which life itself unfolds and the social is produced. What might be gained, then, by shifting the emphasis in studies of 'Japan' away from static, abstract notions like nation-state or national culture, and toward interrogations of the tactics deployed by social actors to survive the conditions of their own lives? How might we enhance our understandings of phenomena ranging from fascism to Fukushima - and, crucially, responses thereto - by attending to the ways in which these unfold in lived geographic, historical, or economic circumstances?

This course will aim to open up new ways of thinking about modern and contemporary Japan by approaching it in terms of 'the everyday,' and the disparate and ambiguous ways in which social actors may conceive of and critique their own place in the world. By attending to literature, music, film, and scholarly texts, we will consider some of the different ways in which 'Japan' has been understood by different actors in different moments, and think about the ways in which the contingent experience of living the everyday can engender specific - and often ambiguous - political stances upon the world.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CEAS401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CEAS402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CEAS403 Department/Program Project or Essay

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CEAS404 Department/Program Project or Essay

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CEAS407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CEAS408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CEAS409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CEAS410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CEAS411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CEAS412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CEAS413 Korean Drumming and Creative Music

This course is an experiential, hands-on percussion ensemble with the two-headed janggo drum the predominant instrument in Korean music. Students will be introduced to traditional folk and court styles of janggo drumming. They will learn to play a range of percussion instruments including janggo, barrel drum, and hand gong.

The ensemble plays arranged pieces based on both traditional and new materials and creates new work exploring imaginative sounds on those instruments. The ensemble will experience a deep respect for the diverse cultural backgrounds of the students developed from the efforts of teamwork and creating music together through Korean drumming. The semester will end with a live performance.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-MUSC
Identical With: MUSC413
Prereq: None

CEAS416 Beginning Taiko--Japanese Drumming Ensemble

This course introduces students to Japanese taiko drumming. The overarching goal of this class is to gain a broad understanding of Japanese culture by studying the theory, performance practices, and history of various genres of classical, folk, and contemporary music traditions. Students will gain a better understanding of the spirit behind the matsuri (festival) and other Japanese performance arts through learning two to three pieces on the Japanese taiko drum and basic techniques of playing the shinobue (bamboo flute). Students should wear clothes appropriate for demanding physical activity (i.e., stretching, squatting, various large arm movements).
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-MUSC
Identical With: MUSC416
Prereq: None

CEAS418 Advanced Taiko--Japanese Drumming Ensemble

This is course is for students who have taken Beginning Taiko. Acceptance to this class is at the discretion of the instructor. Students will learn advanced techniques in taiko drumming, singing, and fue, Japanese flute.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-MUSC
Identical With: MUSC418
Prereq: None

CEAS419 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

CEAS420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

CEAS428 Chinese Music Ensemble

Students will learn both traditional and contemporary instrumental pieces of Chinese music, as well as different regional styles. The ensemble will present a concert at the end of each semester. Attendance for the class is mandatory.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-MUSC
Identical With: MUSC428
Prereq: None

CEAS460 Introduction to Sumi-e Painting

We will learn basic technique and composition of traditional Japanese sumi-e painting. Sumi-e is a style of black-and-white calligraphic ink painting that originated in China and was introduced into Japan by Zen monks around 1333. We will concentrate on the four basic compositions of sumi-e: bamboo, chrysanthemum, orchid, and plum blossom. We will also study the works of the more famous schools, such as Kano. Students will create a portfolio of class exercises and their own creative pieces.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARST260
Prereq: None

CEAS461 Alternative Printmaking: Beginning Japanese Woodblock Technique

Students are taught traditional Japanese techniques for conceptualizing a design in terms of woodcut, carving the blocks, and printing them, first in trial proofs and editions. After understanding how both of these methods were originally used and then seeing how contemporary artists have adapted them to their own purposes, both for themselves and in collaboration with printers, students will use them to fulfill their own artistic vision. Considerable use is made of the Davison Art Center collection of traditional and contemporary Japanese prints as well as many European and American woodcuts.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARST261
Prereq: None

CEAS467 Independent Study, Undergraduate

Credit may be earned for an independent study during a summer or authorized leave of absence provided that (1) plans have been approved in advance, and (2) all specified requirements have been satisfied.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

CEAS469 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

CEAS491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CEAS492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

Chinese

CHIN101 Chinese Character Writing

This course supplements Elementary Chinese I (CHIN103) and focuses on the writing of Chinese characters. It is not a course in Chinese calligraphy but in basic writing. Strict stroke order will be introduced. About 600 Chinese characters will be covered.This is required for students who will be taking CH 103
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CHIN102 Chinese Character Writing

This course supplements Elementary Chinese I (CHIN103) and focuses on the writing of Chinese characters. It is not a course in Chinese calligraphy but in basic writing. Strict stroke order will be introduced. About 600 Chinese characters will be covered.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CHIN103 Elementary Chinese I

This course is an introduction to modern Chinese (Mandarin), both spoken and written. Class meets daily, five hours a week. Regular work in the language laboratory is required. Students with significant experience speaking Chinese (any dialect) at home should enroll in CHIN105, not CHIN103. All students in CHIN103 are required to additionally enroll in CHIN101, Chinese Character Writing, as a writing lab course. Credits will be received for CHIN103 when you successfully complete CHIN104.
Offering: Host
Grading: Amp Graded
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CHIN104 Elementary Chinese II

Continuation of CHIN103, an introduction to modern Chinese, both spoken and written.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: CHIN103

CHIN105 Elementary Chinese for Heritage Learners

This course is for students who have family backgrounds in Chinese language. It is appropriate for students who are already familiar with basic speaking and have excellent listening comprehension of any dialect of Chinese but cannot read or write. The course focuses on teaching students how to read and write Chinese characters. After this course, most students should be able to continue in second-semester Intermediate Chinese II (CHIN206) or Third-Year Chinese (CHIN218).
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CHIN205 Intermediate Chinese I

This course continues an intense and engaging level of practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese from CHIN103 and 104. We will conduct classes according to an interactive approach: between the reproductive and the performative, between role-playing and creative participation, and between oral sessions and written texts. Emphasis will be placed increasingly on expressive speaking and writing.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: CHIN104

CHIN206 Intermediate Chinese II

This course continues all-round practice in listening, speaking, and writing Chinese from CHIN205. We will conduct classes according to an interactive approach: between the reproductive and the performative, between role-playing and creative participation, and between oral sessions and written texts. Emphasis will be placed increasingly on expressive speaking and writing.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: CHIN205

CHIN217 Third-Year Chinese I

Third-year Chinese is designed for advanced beginners who have a firm grasp of the Chinese language but a limited opportunity to expand vocabulary and fluency. The fall semester will cover three major topics: China in change, short stories, and Chinese idioms and popular rhymes.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: CHIN206

CHIN218 Third-Year Chinese II

A continuation of CHIN 217, the spring semester will cover a number of topics, including: cyber bullying and freedom of speech in China, left-behind children in China, privacy and security, labor force in China, and the craze of studying abroad in China.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: CHIN217

CHIN221 Fourth-Year Chinese I

The content of this course includes representative works by a variety of modern and contemporary authors, as well as newspaper articles and television shows. The course will be conducted entirely in Chinese.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: CHIN218

CHIN222 Fourth-Year Chinese II

The content of this course includes representative works by a variety of modern and contemporary authors, as well as newspaper articles and television shows. The course will be conducted in Chinese.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: CHIN221

CHIN223 Creative Writing in Chinese

The class will offer students a chance to use the Chinese language both communicatively and creatively in various literary genres including poetry, song lyrics, short stories, travelogues, memoir, plays, film scripts, and so on. The class is divided into three main sections. First, we will engage in close readings of some of the most interesting writings of contemporary Chinese literature that are both well-crafted and culturally significant. Second, using the class readings as reference points, the students will write their own pieces about their daily lives and dreams, oversea experiences as cultural observers, science fiction that portrays a future utopia, adaptations of Chinese ghost stories, and their imaginary lives as nonhuman animals. Third, the students will engage in dynamic class discussions and workshop each other¿s writings.

The class is not a standard advanced Chinese class. Bearing in mind that some of the most memorable Chinese poems and stories are written in simple language, participants in the class will focus on how to use the words and expressions they already know in fresh and innovative ways while expanding the horizon of their understanding of Chinese and global cultures. Native Chinese speakers, heritage speakers, and students who have taken Third Year Chinese and above can take the class and learn from each other in groups. No previous experience of creative writing is required.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CHIN230 Contemporary Society in China

This is an advanced language course in which students learn by reading and discussing the articles online on various current topics. Topics include culture, academic subjects, and controversial issues. Students will learn specific vocabulary of these topics to further understand the culture and social development of China. By the end of the course, students will have improved their oral and writing proficiency in professional use of the Chinese language.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CHIN301 A Glance at Chinese Literature and Culture

This is a general introduction to classical, modern, and contemporary Chinese literature. Students will read literary works valued greatly in Chinese history which will help frame an examination of Chinese language, literature, and culture. The values of Chinese culture that emerge in and from these texts will be discussed and contextualized.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

CHIN351 Classical Chinese Philosophy: Chinese Lab

This 0.5 credit course is conducted in Chinese and designed to supplement the standard English-language Classical Chinese Philosophy (PHIL205) course. Students must have taken PHIL205 in the past or be enrolled in it simultaneously. The course will have two main foci: introducing students to modern and contemporary Chinese-language debates about Chinese philosophy and exploring in greater depth the meaning of key passages from the classical works students are reading in translation in PHIL205.

Both advanced learners of Chinese (fourth-year level or above) and native speakers are welcome. Familiarity with classical Chinese is desirable but not required. Assignments will include presentations in Chinese and some written work in English; evaluation will be tailored to each student's language background. If you are unsure whether your language background is sufficient for the course, please contact the instructor.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Identical With: PHIL251
Prereq: None

CHIN401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHIN402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHIN407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CHIN408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CHIN409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHIN410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHIN411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHIN412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHIN419 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

CHIN420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

CHIN465 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHIN466 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHIN491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHIN492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

Japanese

JAPN103 Elementary Japanese I

An introduction to modern Japanese, both spoken and written. Class meets daily, five hours a week, and includes weekly TA sessions. No credit will be received for this course until you have completed JAPN104.
Offering: Host
Grading: Amp Graded
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

JAPN104 Elementary Japanese II

Continuation of JAPN103, an introduction to modern Japanese, both spoken and written. Class meets daily, five hours a week. Weekly TA sessions are mandatory.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: JAPN103

JAPN205 Intermediate Japanese I

This course offers continued practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Four hours of class and a TA session per week.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: JAPN104

JAPN206 Intermediate Japanese II

Speaking, writing, and listening. Reading in selected prose. Four hours of class and a TA session per week.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: JAPN205

JAPN217 Third-Year Japanese I

This course offers continued practice in speaking, listening, writing, and reading. Three hours of class and a TA session per week.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: JAPN206

JAPN218 Third-Year Japanese II

This course introduces selected readings from a range of texts. Course-work includes oral exercises, discussion, and essays in Japanese.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: JAPN217

JAPN219 Fourth-Year Japanese I

This course includes close reading of modern literary texts, current events reported in the media, and visual materials. The content and cultural contexts of the assignments will be examined through critical discussion in Japanese.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: JAPN218

JAPN220 Fourth-Year Japanese II

This course includes continued practice in reading, writing, speaking, and listening to modern Japanese. The class will be conducted entirely in Japanese.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: JAPN219

JAPN229 Debating Japan and the World in Japanese

Tied to courses being offered in the CEAS, students in this course read related literature, scholarly articles and blogs, watch videos and films, and debate in Japanese about current events and issues surrounding Japan, Asia, and the world. Guest Japanese speakers may visit the class. Some possible themes are foodways, educational systems, Japanese relations with other Asian countries, identity and stereotypes, and cultural appropriation. However, an overarching focus will be on the history and current dynamics of Japanese-American relations. All materials, reading and writing assignments, and discussion will be in Japanese, with some comparative materials in English, and some translation by students into English. Native speakers of Japanese are strongly encouraged to participate.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

JAPN230 Contemporary Japanese Politics in Japanese

This seminar is a discussion-based class designed for advanced language learners and native speakers of Japanese. We will discuss a wide range of contemporary topics in Japanese society and politics. All texts, discussions, and assignments will be in Japanese. Diverse texts will be used--for example, newspaper, magazine, and academic journal articles as well as video broadcasts and web resources.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

JAPN401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

JAPN402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

JAPN407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

JAPN408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

JAPN409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

JAPN410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

JAPN411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

JAPN412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

JAPN419 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

JAPN420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

JAPN465 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

JAPN466 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

JAPN491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

JAPN492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

Korean

KREA153 Elementary Korean I

Elementary Korean is offered as a yearlong course that will introduce students to written and spoken Korean. Taught by a native-speaker instructor, the course is useful to students who may have spoken Korean at home as well as to those students who have no previous experience with the language.
Offering: Host
Grading: Amp Graded
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

KREA154 Elementary Korean II

Elementary Korean II is the second part of the elementary course in Korean. Students will develop communicative skills in speaking and listening, but increased attention will be given to reading and writing.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: [KREA153 or LANG153 or ALIT153 or EAST153]

KREA205 Intermediate Korean I

Intermediate Korean I is the first part of the intermediate course in spoken and written Korean. Various functions of more complex grammar patterns will be introduced in a variety of sociocultural contexts. Upon the completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate higher levels of balanced communicative skills in speaking, reading, writing, and listening.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: None

KREA206 Intermediate Korean II

Intermediate Korean II is the second half of the intermediate course in spoken and written Korean. Various functions of more complex grammar patterns will be introduced in a variety of sociocultural contexts. Upon the completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate higher levels of balanced communicative skills in speaking, reading, writing, and listening.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: KREA205

KREA217 Advanced Korean I

Advanced Korean I is the first half of the advanced course in spoken and written Korean. Various functions of more complex grammar patterns and vocabulary than those learned in previous levels will be introduced in a variety of sociocultural contexts. Upon the completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an advanced level of balanced communicative skills in speaking, reading, writing, and listening.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: KREA206

KREA218 Advanced Korean II

Advanced Korean II is the second half of the advanced course in spoken and written Korean. In addition to the textbook, selected readings from news articles and short stories from modern Korean literature will be introduced to help students develop their writing skills and a higher level of reading comprehension. Upon the completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an advanced level of balanced communicative skills in speaking, reading, writing, and listening.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Prereq: KREA217

KREA401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

KREA402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

KREA412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

KREA491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

KREA492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT