Latin (LAT)

LAT101 First-Year Latin: Semester I

Conquer Latin in two semesters! Acquire a basic vocabulary and build your skills with essential grammar as you develop your ability to read passages in Latin from the principal classical authors--including Cicero, Vergil, and Ovid. This first semester covers half the textbook. In the second semester (LAT 102), you will complete the textbook.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT102 First-Year Latin: Semester II

Continue your conquest of Latin by completing your acquisition of a basic vocabulary and essential grammar.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: LAT101

LAT104 Intensive Introductory Latin

Learn Latin in a semester with this intensive introduction to grammar and syntax. Readings in original authors help illustrate and reinforce the fundamental principles of the language in preparation for more advanced reading at the intermediate level. Recommended for students wanting accelerated Latin acquisition or those with some background wanting a quick review.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT202 Ovid: METAMORPHOSES

Students will read in Latin selected stories from the METAMORPHOSES, Ovid's great un-epic epic, in which he recounts myths of shape-changers from the creation of the world down to his own time and that of the emperor Augustus. Ovid's stories inspire humor, pathos, and horror and may be grotesque or sentimental, sometimes both at the same time. They deal with issues such as divinity, power, love, rape, order, and identity, all in classic versions of famous myths influential throughout the centuries, told with the poet's distinctive wit and sense of incongruity. The class will focus on close reading of the Latin text and on Ovid's treatment of the myths and the distinctive approach he brings to the ever-shifting world he describes. The course will include an introduction to Latin meter, and class discussion will address modern critical approaches to Ovid.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT203 Latin Prose: Roman Letters

An introduction to the reading of classical Latin prose, the course will include a review of Latin grammar and syntax. Students will read selections from the letters of Seneca the Younger and Pliny the Younger. Seneca, a distinguished philosopher and statesman of the Neronian period, uses his experiences in contemporary Rome as texts from which to derive simple philosophical messages. Pliny recounts events from the life of an Italian aristocrat of the first century CE, including an eyewitness account of the eruption of Vesuvius. The course will begin slowly, with the aim of gradually acclimatizing students to the rhythms and stylistic and syntactical patterns of Latin prose. The emphasis will be on understanding and translating the Latin, but we will consider the social and cultural background to the texts we read.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT230 Love and Suffering in Ancient Rome (CLAC)

In this CLAC course students with some background in ancient Latin will read selections of the extant sources on love and suffering in Roman myth, history, and thought. The sources that we will cover will be drawn from diverse genres and periods: historiography, epic poetry, lyric poetry, and comedy. This diversity will offer a unique opportunity to students to identify and analyze the intersections of age, class, status, gender, and ethnicity and the way they shaped Roman ideology on "love." We will be looking at how cultural practice shapes language, how ideology shapes law, and how literature challenged cultural norms of love and marriage, all the while unpacking and interrogating the Roman belief that love had no place in the citizen life dedicated to serving the state: love produces suffering. In turn, we will reflect on the ideological shift in the last 150 years that has come to dominate "western" beliefs on love and marriage, that is, "all you need is love," over family, friends, and society, despite the obstacles: suffering produces love.

The selections of readings will be drawn primarily from what the students read in translation in the parent course. The final selection will be based on the level of the students. This CLAC is conceived as appropriate for students on the intermediate and advanced level of ancient Latin.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: CGST231
Prereq: LAT102

LAT254 Apuleius: THE GOLDEN ASS

Fast-paced, magical, sexy, and bizarre, Apuleius' GOLDEN ASS, or METAMORPHOSES, contains more than enough rowdy episodes to keep us entertained for a semester. The novel tells the story of the feckless Lucius, the man-turned-ass whose encounters with the residents of Thessaly range from the vulgar to the weird to the sublime. Our goals, in addition to reading and understanding the Latin, include tracing prominent themes and becoming acquainted with recent relevant scholarship.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT262 Reading Latin, Writing Latin

This is a nontraditional introduction to writing Latin. Through reading and discussing short selections of mainly narrative and descriptive Latin prose from all periods, from the classical to the Renaissance, students will develop greater familiarity with Latin styles and the expressive possibilities of the language. Students will try writing Latin themselves (often collaboratively and with ample opportunity for revision). Subjects will include proverbs, familiar sayings or catchphrases, song lyrics, and so forth (anything is fair game for translation), as well as short narratives, culminating in a final project. As well as developing greater facility with Latin, students will reflect on the experience of learning Latin, the history of Latin, and its place in the modern world.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-LAT
Prereq: None

LAT270 Catullus

The poetry of Catullus often has an immediate appeal to contemporary readers. In Tom Stoppard's play THE INVENTION OF LOVE, the claim is made that he invented love as we think of it. But in addition to his love poetry, Catullus is also the writer of a mini-mythological epic (an epyllion), an account of the strange story of the self-castration of Attis, wedding hymns, translations from Greek lyric, invective, and elegy. In this course, we will read an extensive selection of Catullus' poetry and discuss the critical issues they raise in the light of selected readings from modern scholarship.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT281 Roman Satire: Juvenal

Roman satire, as practiced by Lucilius, Horace, Persius, and Juvenal is a strange hybrid: it combines social criticism, literary parody, philosophical rumination, and obscene burlesque, a self-consciously "humble" genre set in the framework of dactylic hexameter, the meter of high-flown Homeric and Vergilian epic. It is among a small minority of ancient literature which directly addresses itself to the humbler aspects of the everyday lives of Roman citizens. This course on Roman satire will focus on Juvenal, the last practictioner of Roman verse satire. We will begin the course with a selection of short readings from each of the four Roman satirists in order to orient ourselves with standard topics of Roman satire (including dining, country vs. urban life, the body, sex, and gender roles) and differentiate the approaches. We will spend the rest of the semester exploring Juvena's seminal works: his first and second book of Satires, wherein he situates himself as a figure marginalized by a new order of foreign interlopers, powerful gender deviants, and tyrannical patrons and emperors, as well as Satire 10, his caustically philosophical take on the "Vanity of Human Wishes."
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT301 Petronius

Follow the down-and-out Roman Encolpius as he embarks on a titillating tour of the Mediterranean, persecuted (with impotence!) by the phallic god Priapus. Join him as he attends the longest dinner party in Latin literature, a class-crossing affair including nouveau riche, citizens, slaves, freedmen, and foreigners. In addition to reading the Latin, we will examine issues of scholarship, from the title (Satyrica? Satyricon?), to the genre, to sexuality, to class and status.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT331 Vergil: AENEID 2

Vergil's Aeneid book 2 is almost cinematic in its tragic, poignant, and frenetic depiction of the fall of Troy, from looming threat of the Trojan Horse to the firing of the city, rooftop battles, and the violent loss of loved ones while the gods manipulate events with petty disdain for human life. Students will read book 2 in its entirety in Latin, and the rest of the work in English. The purpose of this course is to continue to develop skills in reading Latin poetry and to continue the study of Latin grammar with close reading and critical analysis.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT353 Demagogues and Tyrants in the Roman Historians

Reading selections from Livy's ab Urbe Condita, Sallust's Bellum Catilinae, and Tacitus' Annales we will consider these historians' depictions of tyrants and demagogues (e.g., the Tarquins, Catiline, Tiberius, Nero) throughout Rome's political history, their views on the interactions between these controversial figures and the Senate and people of Rome, and their narratives describing the circumstances behind their rise and fall. At the same time, we will explore the role of fact vs. fiction, propaganda, and bias in the writing of Roman history through comparative analysis with contemporary sources and inscriptional evidence.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

LAT408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

LAT409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT424 Advanced Research Seminar, Undergraduate

Advanced research tutorial; project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT