2020-2021 Edition

Academic Catalog

French Language and Literature (FREN)

FREN101 Elementary French I

This course is designed for first-time French learners who wish to acquire and develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills by learning basic vocabulary, useful expressions, and fundamental grammatical structures. Students will also gain cultural insights into the French-speaking world, from Senegal to New Caledonia, from Quebec to Louisiana, from Belgium to Guadeloupe, and beyond. In class students will participate in activities that promote communicative proficiency and cultural competence through vocabulary and grammar exercises, games, skits, conversation, authentic readings, and the use of various audio-visual materials. Classes are conducted in French. FREN 101 is the first semester of the elementary and intermediate French language sequence.
Offering: Host
Grading: BMO
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN102 Elementary French II

This second-semester elementary French course is designed for students who have taken FREN101 or one to two years of French in high school. The main goal of this course is to enable students to achieve intermediate communicative proficiency in French by developing their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students will thus increase their vocabulary, learn more advanced grammatical structures, and gain further cultural insights into the French-speaking world. In class students will participate in activities that promote communication and cultural competence through vocabulary and grammar exercises, games, skits, conversation, authentic readings, and the use of various audio-visual materials. Classes are conducted in French.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN110 Accelerated Intermediate French I & II

This course combines two semesters of intermediate French into one to allow for a faster track in French. The course develops students' abilities in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing through oral and written practice. It focuses on grammatical structures and vocabulary at the intermediate level and introduces students to contemporary French-language cultures from around the world through discussion of cultural and literary texts and use of audiovisual material.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN111 Intermediate French I

Students will develop their abilities in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing through oral and written practice. The course focuses on grammatical structures and vocabulary at the intermediate level and introduces students to contemporary French-language cultures from around the world through discussion of cultural and literary texts and use of audiovisual material.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN112 Intermediate French II

This is a course for students who have taken FREN 111 or arrive at Wesleyan with a good command of French and are ready to develop their reading, writing, and speaking skills through exposure to a variety of challenging cultural and literary materials in various media. It includes a review of basic grammar but emphasizes more complex linguistic structures.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN215 Composition and Conversation

This course prepares students for upper-level French courses and for study abroad. It offers students the opportunity to review and strengthen their speaking, writing, and reading abilities in French. Class time is devoted to grammar review and to discussions of short reading assignments (literary and nonliterary) from the French-speaking world (France, Africa, and the Caribbean). The semester ends with students reading an entire novel in French. Daily class discussions, oral presentations, weekly discussions with French teaching assistants, laboratory practice, outside-of-class grammar review, and compositions are to be expected.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN220 Lancelot, Guinevere, Grail: Enigma in the Romances of Chretien de Troyes

Chretien de Troyes, the greatest writer of medieval France, was the first to tell the stories of Lancelot and Guinevere's fatal passion and of the quest for the Holy Grail. Written at the height of the Renaissance of the 12th century, his Arthurian tales became the basis for all future retellings of the legend. We will read these tales in depth, paying particular attention to their enigmatic quality.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: MDST230
Prereq: None

FREN221 French Mythologies

Starting from "Mythologies" by Roland Barthes (1957) and "Nouvelles Mythologies" edited by Jerome Garcin (2007), this course examines how contemporary social values are turned into modern myths and some of the domains that seem to define France in the 21st century. How do the representations of food, fashion, le chic, la laïcité, strikes, colonialism and post-colonialism, etc., in contemporary novels and films still define France today?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN222 Love and Loss in Medieval and Early Modern French Literature and Culture

The interconnected themes of love and loss encompass others such as desire, passion, friendship, death, separation, and grief. This course introduces students to the uses of these themes in French literature of the medieval and early modern periods by reading a range of texts, from the courtly romance and lyric poetry, to the essay, the novella, and theater. We will examine how men and women treat these themes, and we will be especially sensitive to the ways in which women write in genres traditionally dominated by men. Topics of study will include the body, virtues and vices, marriage, sexuality, seduction, chastity, and violence. We will also place emphasis on improving French pronunciation and on developing oral presentation and written skills. Readings, papers, and discussions will be in French.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: COL217, MDST220
Prereq: None

FREN224 Cultural Mo(uve)ments from the 19th to 21st Centuries

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with movements such as romanticism, realism, surrealism, and the Nouveau Roman, to name a few. Some of these movements stem directly from the political context, while others seem to have grown almost organically. Though the course will primarily rely on literary texts, it will also examine the "passerelles" between literature, music, and painting.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN225 20th-Century Franco-Caribbean Literature and the Search for Identity

This course investigates how 20th-century Francophone literature from the Caribbean defines Caribbean identity. Through a study of literary texts, films, and paintings from Guadeloupe, Martinique, Haiti, Guyana, and Louisiana, we will explore the evolution of Caribbean self-definition, focusing on the major concepts of Negritude, Antillanite, Creolite, and Louisianitude.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: COL225, AFAM223, AMST226, LAST220
Prereq: None

FREN228 Fight like the French: Debates, Quarrels and Polemics in French Culture

In the age of "fake news" and polarization, knowing how to debate is essential. The French are notoriously practiced in debate; the importance of public opinion and the figure of the public intellectual have made French society as a whole particularly prone to the agonistic discussion of ideas. This course will survey foundational aesthetic and political debates in French culture from the 15th century to this day, focusing on those that were led by writers, philosophers, and intellectuals and that have entered French literary and cultural history. The course will show how controversies mark and make paradigmatic changes in the cultural landscape, advancing the arts and sciences and voicing political dissent. Throughout the course we will read literary works, treatises, letters, and newspapers.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: MDST229
Prereq: None

FREN230 Knights, Fools, and Lovers: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance French Culture

The study of history and past literature provides intellectual, psychological and emotional resources that make one more resilient in adapting to new circumstances, enable one to see new possibilities of being-in-the-world, and provide new capacities for self-understanding. A knowledge of the European past, moreover, can be an advantage for people seeking to study, live, or work in Europe. This course will help students develop those resources and knowledge through a study of various forms of short fiction and poetry from the French Middle Ages and the Renaissance (12th-16th centuries). We will focus on the representations of human relations, above all romantic relations and their inherent conflicts of power, in these works. We will also view a couple of historical films in order to develop our visual imagination.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: MDST257
Prereq: None

FREN231 By Sword, By Cross, and By Pen: An Introduction to Early Modern French Literature and Culture

This course introduces French literature and culture from the 15th to the 17th centuries, when the French territory expanded to its present borders with the rise of the French monarchy. Historical developments include religious upheaval and civil war, overseas exploration and conquest, and the greater dissemination of written works with the invention of the printing press. In this evolving context we will read a variety of literary works of prose and poetry. We will follow the emergence of genres such as the essay and the novel, and observe how different literary forms served to express ideas ranging from personal experiences to sociopolitical aspects of contemporary society. Several film representations of this period will also help us consider how we envision the past.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN238 Representing the Self, Representing Yourself

In our digital age, with the pervasiveness of Facebook, Instagram, and other forms of social media, what can testimony do? What stories are told? How are they told? What do they mean? How do writers, artists, musicians, intellectuals, and politicians represent themselves? As students, how can you give your memories material substance? How do others' narratives influence the way you interpret your own being? In this course, we will begin to answer these questions by reading, watching, and examining a vast selection of French and Francophone texts, films, and images that recount the self from the Middle Ages to today. There will be a particular focus on queer people, women, and people of color, and how they negotiate difference and alterity in their work. Throughout the course, you will also journal your own experiences and imitate other writers' modes of expression (e.g., memoires, autobiographies, autofiction, the graphic novel, film, documentary, theater, poetry, music, photography). The course will culminate in the creation of your own story, which will in turn prepare you to think critically about the world around you and how to tell your story in interesting, creative, and provocative ways. We will also place emphasis on improving French pronunciation and on developing oral presentation and written skills. Readings, papers, and discussions will be in French.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN254 Paris to Saigon: French Representations of Asia

The course explores the ways in which French explorers, writers, and artists traveled to Asian countries, such as Japan, China, and Vietnam, in the 19th and 20th centuries and represented "Extrême-Orient," a Eurocentric designation. Attentive analysis of their works will allow us to question the colonial construction of the Far East as "other"; examine Asian influences on cultural, aesthetic, and literary expressions; and discuss Asian presence in postcolonial France. Issues such as orientalization, eroticization, and hybridization of genres and identities will be the subjects of our study.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN273 The Business of Letters: The French Epistolary Novel

Before the 18th century, the first-person narrative was often perceived as self-indulgent, not to mention distasteful. Eighteenth-century readers, however, became fascinated with the intimacy, immediacy, realism, and confessional aspect of highly charged first-person perspectives. It comes as no surprise, then, that this was the golden age of the ROMAN EPISTOLAIRE, the novel composed entirely of letters. In this class we will read a number of epistolary novels that allowed for the development of highly subjective, and often challenging, points of view. Sample works include Madame de Graffigny's critique of European society (LETTRES D'UNE PERUVIENNE), Mme de Charriere's praise of female independence (LETTRES DE MISTRISS HENLEY), Montesquieu's political satire of French life (LETTRES PERSANES), and Laclos's tale of seduction and aristocratic libertinage (LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES). We will also read one example of the epistolary novel's stylistic counterpart, the ROMAN-MEMOIRE.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN275 Histories of Race: Science and Slavery in an Age of Enlightenment

The concept of race was first "invented" during the 18th century by anatomists, natural historians, and, ultimately, the century's classifiers. This class will come to grips with the birth of this concept in two ways. First, we will read excerpts from travelogues to Africa and the Caribbean (as well as short excerpts from natural history) in order to chart the slow and halting creation of the concept of race as it crystallized in European thought during the 18th century. Having studied this "proto-raciology," the class will then examine 16 unpublished manuscripts that were submitted to a contest on the source of "blackness" organized by the Bordeaux Royal Academy of Sciences in 1739. These include essays submitted by priests, anatomists, and partisans of climate theory. Students in this class will actively engage with these materials by producing glossary definitions that will be published along with the entire collection of essays. The ultimate goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the concept of race that will inform their reactions to this question as both a historical concept . . . and an ongoing problem that affects all of us in the present.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RLAN
Identical With: COL281
Prereq: None

FREN280 French Cinema: An Introduction

This course introduces students to the history of French cinema (the evolution of its aesthetics as well as of its main themes), from the films of the Lumière brothers in 1895 until now with French filmmakers of Maghrebi origins. One leading question of the course will be, What makes French cinema "French"?
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: COL286
Prereq: None

FREN281 French and Francophone Theater in Performance

This course introduces students to the richness of the French and Francophone dramatic repertories, on the one hand, and, on the other, invites them to discover acting techniques (such as movement, physicalization, memorization, mise en scène, and so forth). Students will thus put their language skills into motion, and the course will culminate in a public performance at the end of the semester. (Special accommodations will be made for students who do not wish to perform publicly). Taught exclusively in French, the course will place particular emphasis on the improvement of students' oral skills through pronunciation and diction exercises, all the while polishing their written expression and enhancing their aural comprehension.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.25
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: THEA291
Prereq: None

FREN305 Negotiating French Identity: Migration and Identity in Contemporary France

With the largest minority in France being of Maghrebi origin, Islam has become the second largest religion in France today. What are the repercussions of this phenomenon for French identity? How did French society understand its identity and regard foreigners in the past? What do members of the growing Franco-Maghrebi community add to the ongoing dialogue surrounding France's republican and secular identity? This course will analyze the recent attempts at redefining French identity through a study of literary texts, films, and media coverage of important societal debates (e.g., the Scarf Affair, French immigration laws, the Algerian war). Readings, discussions, and papers will be in French.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: COL307
Prereq: None

FREN306 Spectacles of Violence in Early Modern French Tragedy

The French Kingdom endured decades of socio-political unrest and religious wars during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The tragedies that emerged from these bloody conflicts--many of which staged physical violence--not only reflected but also actively participated in the debates surrounding the 'troubles civils.' In this advanced seminar, we will study such tragedies in order to examine the uses, functions, and ethics of spectacular violence, in plays that adapt mythological stories (e.g., Medea), religious narratives (e.g. David and Goliath, Saint Cecilia), and current events (e.g., executions, assassinations, and regicides) for the stage. We will read the plays alongside and against the competing theoretical frameworks of violence found in various poetic treatises of the time period, yet we will also keep in mind the practical constraints and conditions of performance in early modern France. Finally, we will reflect on why we should read these plays today and how they inform our contemporary moment. Readings, written assignments, and discussion will be in French.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: COL306, THEA292
Prereq: None

FREN307 Exoticism: Imaginary Geographies in the 19th-century French Short Story

This course will consider the fascination with the exotic--with foreign landscapes, customs, and culture--in 19th-century French fiction, particularly in the genre of the short story. Discussions will focus on the representation of foreignness, the construction of the exotic woman, and the status of the European gaze. Major authors may include Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, Chateaubriand, Balzac, Merimee, Loti, Flaubert, Hugo, Baudelaire, Myriam Harry, and Théophile Gautier.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN309 Writing Childhood in Contemporary French Literature

In the 20th century, children's literature and writings about childhood expanded alongside commercial book publishing, greater literacy, and theories on childhood. This course will follow the development of formal and creative expressions of childhood by turning first toward children's literature, including picture and comic books and classic works such as "Le Petit Prince." Literary depictions of childhood, as memory, testimony, and social commentary, will compose the second half of the course. Visual imagery (book illustrations, films) will be studied as well to consider the connections between childhood and its representations--for example, how children's literature reflects modernity and how childhood is a means to make sense of adulthood.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN310 French Crowds, Mobs, and Mobilities

Under the date of 14th July 1789, Louis XVI entered in his diary but one word: "Rien." That day, a crowd of sans-culottes flooded the streets of Paris, overwhelmed the guards, and captured the Bastille. What the king could not foresee is the political power of a mob, a "foule," deriving its etymology and strength from the pressure of thousands of feet pounding the pavement. From this founding event on, the building of the French nation could be read as a history of mobile crowds kept alive today in yearly student and union demonstrations. How does "rien" become the emblematic event of French national identity? What moves a crowd, and what does a crowd move? What do such gatherings accomplish, and how do they form in France and why?

Drawing on French sociology and literature, this course will explore the influence that crowds have exerted on French politics, society, and aesthetics. We will discuss the power of numbers by focusing on major subversive events in French history from the 18th century to contemporary France: the French Revolution, Chouanneries, barricades and the Commune in Paris, and May 1968, but also colonial and immigrant demonstrations in France. Students will be encouraged to relate the course to their own experience of mobile crowds, in concerts or sports events, on more quotidian moves such as commuting, and to draw comparisons with demonstrations across time and space, such as the "Arab Spring."
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN315 The Politics of the French Language and the Birth of the French State

Today, the advantages of national borders and monolinguistic language policies are being trumpeted all across the world. And yet, the study of premodern languages and literatures reveals that the history of national languages has always been a multicultural affair. In this course, we will look at the case of the French language, particularly the establishment of French as a literary language through strategies of legitimization. Starting with an examination of the first text written in the language that would later become French, from the 9th century, we will then go on to study (in modern French) a series of medieval and early-modern poems, plays, treatises and essays that borrow from other languages and literatures, even as they establish French as a literary and a national language. The final portion of this class will include a meditation on the status of French language in contemporary Francophone countries based on Derrida's essay "Le monolinguisme de l'autre."
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: MDST315
Prereq: None

FREN324 Interpreting the "New World": France and the Early Modern Americas

The impact and long-lasting effects of the "discovery" of the "New World" on Europeans cannot be overestimated. This advanced seminar will compare and contrast styles of expedition and conquest among the European nations, though the course will focus on the French context and the various events and encounters that occurred in the early modern Americas, particularly between 1492 and 1610, a period that laid the groundwork for the subsequent colonial project. Throughout the course, we will pay special attention to the Amerindians' points of view. In turn, students will examine the insights and blind spots in 16th-century French navigators', cosmographers', cartographers', and intellectuals' interpretations, representations, and negotiations of difference by critically engaging with concepts such as nature, culture, alterity, gender, sexuality, marriage, religion, exchange, possession, conquest, and war. Reading, writing, and class discussions will be in French.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: FGSS324, COL324
Prereq: None

FREN325 Museums, Objects, and Empire: Exhibiting the Self, Exhibiting the Other

This course will analyze the relationship between colonization and material culture. Using literary and historical documents, we will ask how objects helped to construct identities by studying the way objects were collected, used, and displayed during the colonial period. The course will also analyze how spectacles, exhibits, and museums have shaped a discourse about the other. The course will lead to an exhibition based on student work. Reading, writing, and class discussion will be in French.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN330 Lancelot, Guinevere, Grail: Enigma in the Romances of Chretien de Troyes

Chretien de Troyes, the greatest writer of medieval France, was the first to tell the stories of Lancelot and Guinevere's fatal passion and of the quest for the Holy Grail. Written at the height of the Renaissance of the 12th century, his Arthurian tales became the basis for all future retellings of the legend. We will read these tales in depth, paying particular attention to their enigmatic quality.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: MDST330
Prereq: None

FREN333 Asia and the Making of France

Enlightenment philosophers, impressionist painters of the 19th century, and French Maoist intellectuals in the 1960s were all influenced by Asia. Although these influences from Asia were at times the fruit of solid knowledge, they were also often the result of imagination. In addition to attracting French intellectuals and artists, Asia also contributed very concretely to the economic development of modern France and its geopolitical position in the world. This relationship relied on voluntary exchanges but also on violence and French exploitation of Asian territories and people. Through the study of historical documents, films, and literary texts, this course aims to understand the various ways Asia shaped France. We will consider the various representations of Asia conveyed in 19th- and 20th-century France and the historical context of their production by focusing on key moments such as the Opium Wars in China, French colonialism in Indochina, and the two world wars. Reading, writing, and discussion will be in French.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN334 Days and Knights of the Round Table

This course will study the evolution of the Arthurian legend from its origins in sixth-century Britain to its development in the 12th-century romances of Chrétien de Troyes. The course will look at the way the various developments of the legend were rooted in specific historical circumstances and yet contributed to the elaboration of a rich and complex narrative that has been appropriated in different ways by each succeeding period of Western European culture.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: MDST234
Prereq: None

FREN348 Artistic Creation in Fin-de-siècle France

The end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth century--the so-called fin de siècle--was a period of remarkable creative energy, production, and upheaval in France. Many of the most-recognized names in the art world were active there during that time: Debussy, Monet, Picasso, Stravinsky, Matisse, Baudelaire, Van Gogh...and many of them collaborated across media. In this course, we'll dig deep into the music, visual arts, and literature of the period, relying on contemporaneous primary sources (literature, of course, but also newspapers and popular periodicals, artists' letters and manifestos, performance reviews and notes, etc) as well as relevant secondary analyses, to get a sense of the competing energies of liberation and decadence that nourished so many remarkable and influential works of art.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN356 From the Diary to the Stage: Women Writers and Literary Genres from the 17th to the 21st Centuries

While women in France were not welcomed in the literary sphere, they have nonetheless participated in the various movements that have radically affected literature from the 17th century on. The purpose of this course is to discuss women's space within the literary field. Through the study of various texts, this course will examine women's compliance and defiance toward literary trends. It will also investigate the roles of literary categories (letters, plays, fairy tales, poems, novels, and essays) in women's production.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN357 Autobiography and Photography; Text and Image

Over the last decades, the question of autobiography as a genre has been thoroughly analyzed. The issue is further complicated by the use of photography within autobiographical texts, whether they are included in the text or merely described. In this course, we will examine the various roles of photography in autobiography. Is photography a way to trigger memory? Is it more referential than the word? How is the reader to read the coexistence of word and image? Such are some of the questions that will be discussed.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN363 (Un)Popular Performances/Performances (Im)Populaires

In 1607, a young Scotsman named William Drummond was studying law in Bourges, France, a popular "study abroad destination" for Scottish students as well as an important stopover city on the routes of itinerant professional and amateur actors. While in Bourges, these actors performed a variety of different kinds of plays, including tragedies, comedies, tragicomedies, pastorals, and farces. Although these performances were often met with hostility from the city's religious authorities, Drummond attended several plays during his stay and, lucky for us, took rather detailed notes about them. His observations from the 1607 "season" are preserved in his personal papers in the National Library of Scotland.

This course will use Drummond's notes as a guide to discover and examine other forms of evidence--both traditional and nontraditional--that help us understand what was at stake in theater, performance, and (un)popular culture in late 16th- and early 17th-century France. We will study the ways the past has been organized and cataloged, how traditional sources and research have shaped our view of the past, and how unconventional methodologies can help us locate new sites of knowledge and culture. Written assignments, class discussions, and (most) readings will be in French.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM363, COL363
Prereq: None

FREN372 Exoticism: Imaginary Geographies in 18th- and 19th-Century French Literature

This course will consider the fascination with the exotic--with foreign landscapes, customs, and culture--in 18th- and 19th-century French fiction and, to a lesser extent, poetry. Discussions will focus on the representation of foreignness and the construction of the exotic woman, as well as on the status of the European gaze. Major authors may include Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, Chateaubriand, Balzac, Mérimée, Loti, Flaubert, Hugo, Baudelaire, and Gautier.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: COL272
Prereq: None

FREN382 Jungle and Desert in Francophone African Literature

This course analyzes the constellation of images and sensations conjured up by the terms "jungle" and "desert," which are opposite but equally extreme. We will explore European adventure tales and travelogues, contemporary non-Western novels, children's books, and films in a quest to understand the imaginative power of these landscapes.

Through our readings of such a wide range of texts, we will ask questions such as, What do these landscapes signify? How do descriptions of landscape convey a sense of individual and collective identity? What psychological terrain is explored when writing about extreme landscapes? And, finally, how do we each see ourselves in relation to landscape? What is our own version of an "extreme" landscape?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN391 Diderot

In this class we will come to know the most progressive and often radical thinker of the French Enlightenment, Denis Diderot (1713-1784). We will begin this seminar with an examination of how this country abbot grew into the most well known atheist of his generation. We will then move onto his famous 74,000 article Encyclopédie, a book that not only dragged sacrilege and freethinking out into the open, but triggered a decades-long scandal that involved the Sorbonne, the Paris Parliament, the King, and the Pope. (During this portion of the class, students will undertake translations of select entries [from French to English] of the "dictionnaire" for possible publication.) In the second half of the semester, we will also study the writer's freewheeling art criticism. Finally, we will read two groundbreaking novels. The first of these, "La Religieuse", is a gripping pseudo-memoir of a nun who suffers unspeakably cruel abuse after she announces that she wants to leave her convent. The second, "Jacques le Fataliste", is a freewheeling anti-novel where Diderot used fiction to take up the problem of free will. In the final portion of the class, we will also read selections from his anticolonial and antislavery writings.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: COL391
Prereq: None

FREN399 French Histories: National Identity and Narratives since the Third Republic

At the end of the nineteenth century, schooling became free and mandatory in France. Since then, politicians have often considered the teaching of history as key to the construction of French national identity. Even today, some argue that the role of school is to equip children with a national narrative. French historians have questioned and resisted this instrumentalization, denouncing oversimplifications and ideological distortions. They also acknowledge that some biases have pervaded French history.

Through readings of historical novels, biographies, essays, and graphic novels as well as selected film and documentary viewings, this course will explore some of these national narratives and the way French historians, philosophers, and artists have participated in the construction of a French national identity.

The course will focus on France and its colonies since the 1870's and the Third Republic. Preliminary knowledge of the period is not required for this class. The final project will be a re-telling of a French historical event through students' preferred medium (video, graphic novel, essay, or podcast). The assignments during the semester will help students accumulate material and hone their skills toward this goal.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

FREN401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FREN402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FREN403 Department/Program Project or Essay

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

FREN404 Department/Program Project or Essay

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

FREN407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

FREN408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

FREN409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FREN410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FREN411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FREN412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FREN420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

FREN465 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FREN466 Education in the Field

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

FREN491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FREN492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT