2020-2021 Edition

Academic Catalog

College of Social Studies (CSS)

CSS220 Sophomore Economics Tutorial: Topics in the History of Economic Thought

This tutorial uses a topical approach to explore the history of economic thought. We begin with a brief introduction to writers who predated Adam Smith: the scholastics, mercantilists, and physiocrats. Over the subsequent weeks, we compare competing schools of economic thought: classical, Marxian, utilitarian, Austrian, neoclassical, and Keynesian. We include selections of radical critiques from the political right and left including monetarist, supply-side, behavioral, Austrian, evolutionist, and institutional approaches. The theoretical debates both reflect and shed light on the economic and social problems of their time. As you master the material, you should keep several goals in mind. First, learn to link the debates to the economic problems faced by nations over the past 300 years. Second, become skilled at explaining how economic theory has altered its shape and content from the 1700s to the present. Third, sharpen your awareness of the interaction between the scientific and the social aspects of human knowledge. Finally, develop and learn to defend your assessment of mainstream economics; decide which aspects reflect theoretical advancement and which are simply reflections of political agendas or outmoded perspectives. Throughout the course we will use contemporary articles to illustrate modern-day versions of the historical disputes. The course material is designed to provide a fuller context for what you learn in politics, history, and social theory while deepening your understanding of contemporary economic debates.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ECON
Prereq: None

CSS230 Sophomore Government Tutorial: State and Society in the Modern Age

In this course, we will learn about the modern state and its historical foundations. We will explore our subject matter by taking a comparative approach, and applying a variety of theoretical lenses. We will examine the different ways in which the modern state intervenes in social and economic life, how these interventions vary across the world, and how they have transformed since the early 20th century. We will spend some time focusing on the US, and tackling the concept of American exceptionalism. In the final part of the course, we will look at the contemporary debates about the legitimate boundaries of state intervention in society, including the arguments for limited government. We will read the works of Marx, Weber, de Tocqueville, von Mises, Foucault, Bourdieu, James Scott, Charles Tilly, Michael Mann, Phil Gorski, Margot Canaday, David Harvey, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Martin Luther King, Sven Steinmo, Esping-Andersen, Milton Friedman, Suzanne Mettler, Monica Prasad, Thomas Piketty, Katarina Pistor, and Paul Pierson, to name a few.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

CSS240 Sophomore History Tutorial: The Emergence of Modern Europe

This tutorial sequence analyzes the formation of modern European society from the late 18th to the last quarter of the 20th century. Most attention will be placed on Britain, France, Germany and Russia as these countries were shaped by, and responded to, demographic, economic, social, political, and intellectual forces that led to revolutions, political and social reforms, new modes of production, changes in social hierarchies, and new forms of warfare. Much attention will be placed on the social and political consequences of the French Revolution and industrialization, but empire, the origins and consequences of the two world wars (including the Russian revolution and the rise and defeat of Nazism) will also come under extensive discussion, as will the creation of a more stable and prosperous postwar European order. Europe's links to Africa, Asia and the Americas will be discussed in the context of imperialism and the two world wars. In addition to developing knowledge of the most important processes that have shaped the modern world, this tutorial seeks to foster a critical awareness of the varieties of historical narrative, the skills needed to interpret historical primary sources, and the possibilities and limits of history as a tool of social investigation.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Prereq: None

CSS271 Sophomore Colloquium: Modern Social Theory

This colloquium examines a number of competing conceptual frameworks in the social sciences derived from major political philosophers and social theorists, such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Durkheim, Weber, and Freud.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

CSS320 Junior Economics Tutorial: China in the Global Economy

China is a country that is both transitioning to a market-oriented economy and developing rapidly into a global economic power. As such, it has characteristics of both an emerging market economy and a developing country. China is large enough to create its own institutional infrastructure to support a third way between capitalism and socialism. This course examines in detail China's great economic transformation beginning in 1978 in what is often described as a "gradualist" transition to a market economy. In the last four decades, the speed of China's development and its growth rates of GDP are without precedent in history.

China entered the current decade with an unbalanced economy highly dependent on both state-financed investment through a state-controlled financial sector and a growth strategy focused on exporting finished goods to the global economy with the support of foreign direct investment. The current leadership recognizes the need to rebalance the economy by promoting more domestic-fueled growth through increased consumption so as to achieve more broad-based economic development. Many social issues remain to be tackled, among which are environmental degradation, income inequality, and an aging workforce. After developing the economic background that propelled China rapidly into middle-income-country status, this course considers these issues (and others) to provide insights into the fundamental question of "what is left to be done" to create a fully mature, developed market-oriented economic system open to the global economy.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ECON
Prereq: None

CSS330 Junior Government Tutorial: Political Treatises That Changed the World

This sequence in the junior tutorial covers what many consider the most influential political treatises ever written. Each one had pervasive impacts on how people came to think about politics, as well as impacts on human behavior. These works truly changed history. The emphasis each week will be on scrutinizing the content of these treatises and attempting to ascertain why these works were so "great." We will analyze all facets of the arguments to determine the sources of their enormous impact. Many great thinkers penned their ideas. People read many things. What was it about these works that gave them such a greater appeal to the human mind? Why these books? Why these arguments? Ultimately, we seek some sort of understanding of why certain works inspire well beyond the norm. Is there a pattern to the content of arguments that truly mesmerize people? Or is it some random function of time and place? All such questions and issues will be the analytical lenses through which we scrutinize these monumental works.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

CSS340 Junior History Tutorial: U.S. History

This junior tutorial will cover a topic in U.S. history.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Prereq: None

CSS371 Junior Colloquium: Social Theory

This course is a continuation of the sophomore colloquium covering several important social and political theories in the post-World War II era. The course will focus on post-World War II philosopher/theorists who have developed compelling large-scale theories about the nature of modern society: Hannah Arendt, Jurgen Habermas, Francis Fukuyama, John Rawls, and Michael Foucault.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PHIL
Prereq: None

CSS391 Senior Colloquium: Political Economy

This course studies political economy from the vantage point of a broader distinction between the public and private spheres of social life: We consider what that distinction might mean and how it matters, how the two spheres are manifested and interrelate in actual societies, and how the appropriate or "optimal" boundary between the two spheres might be determined. There are a number of lines of social inquiry out there that touch on this distinction. Perhaps none of them fits exactly with our purposes in this course, but the analytical framework of game theory will serve, in a broad way, as the foundation for our inquiries.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ECON
Prereq: None

CSS401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CSS402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CSS407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CSS408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CSS409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CSS410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CSS411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CSS412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CSS419 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

CSS420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

CSS465 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CSS467 Independent Study, Undergraduate

Credit may be earned for an independent study during a summer or authorized leave of absence provided that (1) plans have been approved in advance, and (2) all specified requirements have been satisfied.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CSS469 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

CSS491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

CSS492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT