Government

Wesleyan’s Department of Government is dedicated to exploring “who gets what, when, and how,” as Harold Lasswell defined political science in 1935. The department might well be called a department of political science or a department of politics; it is called the Department of Government for historical reasons. Department faculty today uphold a tradition, more than a century old, of distinction in scholarship and teaching. Each tenured or tenure-track Department of Government faculty member is affiliated with a concentration representing one of the four major subfields of political science: American politics, comparative politics, international politics, or political theory. We offer introductory courses in each of these four concentrations (American is GOVT151; international, GOVT155; comparative, GOVT157; and theory, GOVT159), a range of upper-level courses (201-368), and specialized research seminars (369-399). In addition, we offer courses in research methodology, individual and group tutorials, and tutoring of senior honors theses. Courses numbered 201-368 are ordered according to field of study, not level of difficulty.

Faculty

Joslyn Barnhart Trager
BA, Reed College; MA, Claremont Mckenna; PHD, University of California LA
Assistant Professor of Government

Sonali Chakravarti
BA, Swarthmore College; MA, Yale University; MPHIL, Yale University; PHD, Yale University
Associate Professor of Government; Tutor, College of Social Studies

Logan M. Dancey
BA, University Puget Sound; PHD, Univ. of Minnesota Twin Cities
Assistant Professor of Government

Marc A. Eisner
BA, University of Wisconsin at Madison; MA, Marquette University; MBA, University of Connecticut; PHD, University of Wisconsin at Madison
Dean of the Social Sciences; Henry Merritt Wriston Chair in Public Policy; Professor of Government; Professor, Environmental Studies

Douglas C. Foyle
AB, Stanford University; MA, Duke University; PHD, Duke University
Associate Professor of Government; Tutor, College of Social Studies

Erika Franklin Fowler
BA, St Olaf College; MA, Univ of Wisconsin Madison; PHD, Univ of Wisconsin Madison
Associate Professor of Government

Giulio Gallarotti
BA, Hunter College; PHD, Columbia University
Professor of Government; Co-Chair, College of Social Studies; Tutor, College of Social Studies; Professor, Environmental Studies

Mary Alice Haddad
BA, Amherst College; MA, University of Washington; PHD, University of Washington
Professor of Government; Professor, Environmental Studies; Professor, East Asian Studies

Ioana Emy Matesan
MA, Arizona State University; PHD, Syracuse University
Assistant Professor of Government; Tutor, College of Social Studies

James W. McGuire
BA, Swarthmore College; MA, University of California, Berkeley; PHD, University of California, Berkeley
Professor of Government; Professor, Latin American Studies

J. Donald Moon
BA, University Minnesota Mpls; MA, University of California, Berkeley; PHD, University Minnesota Mpls
Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Professor in the College of Social Studies; Professor of Government; Chair, Government; Tutor, College of Social Studies; Professor, Environmental Studies

Justin Craig Peck
BA, Brandeis University; MA, University of Virginia; PHD, University of Virginia
Assistant Professor of Government

Peter Rutland
BA, Oxford University; DPHIL, York University
Colin and Nancy Campbell Professor in Global Issues and Democratic Thought; Professor of Government; Director, Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life; Professor, Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies; Tutor, College of Social Studies

Yamil Ricardo Velez
BA, Florida State University; PHD, SUNY at Stony Brook
Assistant Professor of Government

Sarah E. Wiliarty
BA, Harvard University; MA, University of California, Berkeley; PHD, University of California, Berkeley
Associate Professor of Government; Tutor, College of Social Studies; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Associate Professor, German Studies

Affiliated Faculty

Louise S. Brown
BA, Mount Holyoke College; PHD, University Mass Amherst
Dean for Academic Advancement/Dean for the Class of 2021; Adjunct Lecturer, Government

Robert Cassidy
BA, Fitchburg State; MA, Boston University; MA, Tufts University; PHD, Tufts University
Retired Officer Teaching Fellow, Government; Retired Officer Teaching Fellow

Joan Cho
BA, University of Rochester; MA, Harvard University; PHD, Harvard University
Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies; Assistant Professor, Government

Visiting Faculty

Benjamin Thomas Krupicka
BA, Willamette University; MA, University of California, Berkeley
Visiting Instructor in Government

Kelly Senters
BA, Lafayette College; PHD, University of Illinois Urbana
Visiting Assistant Professor of Government

Emeriti

Richard W. Boyd
BA, University of Texas Austin; MAA, Wesleyan University; PHD, Indiana University Bloomington
Professor of Government, Emeritus

Barbara H. Craig
BA, University Maine; MAA, Wesleyan University; MPA, University of Connecticut; PHD, University of Connecticut
Professor of Government, Emerita

Martha Crenshaw
BA, Newcomb College Tulane U; MA, University of Virginia; MAA, Wesleyan University; PHD, University of Virginia
Colin and Nancy Campbell Professor in Global Issues and Democratic Thought, Emerita

John E. Finn
BA, Nasson College; JD, Georgetown University; PHD, Princeton University
Professor of Government, Emeritus

Russell D. Murphy
BA, St Johns College; MA, Boston College; MA, Yale University; MAA, Wesleyan University; PHD, Yale University
Professor of Government, Emeritus

Nancy L. Schwartz
BA, Oberlin College; MAA, Wesleyan University; PHD, Yale University
Professor of Government, Emerita

Departmental Advising Expert

Don Moon

GOVT108 Public Opinion and American Democracy

Central to the concept of a representative democracy is the idea that citizens hold elected officials accountable for the policies they enact (or fail to enact). Yet ordinary American citizens know little about politics and often appear as if they have few consistent opinions. Still, elected officials, aspiring candidates, media, and organized interests spend considerable time scrutinizing political polls, which are increasing in number. Can citizens be uninformed and public opinion informative at the same time? If so, what are the implications for democratic representation? This seminar will introduce the ways in which public opinion is measured, where opinions or attitudes come from and how they are changed, the determinants of vote choice, and the relationship between public opinion and policy outcomes. This course does NOT count toward the government major.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT110 The American Constitutional Order

This course introduces students to the American constitutional order and to key concepts associated with constitutional design and governance.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT151 American Government and Politics

This course introduces the "building blocks" of American politics and government at the national level. It has four main parts: (1) foundations of our governmental system, (2) political institutions and the way they generate policy, (3) politics at the level of the individual citizen and the mechanisms that link the masses to elites, and (4) how all the factors come together in the making of public policy. We will scrutinize insider accounts of politics, scholarly work on governmental processes, and popular debates on issues and institutions. In addition, we will discuss why Americans are often so unhappy with their politics and politicians and the challenges faced by elected officials attempting to meet a wide scope of public demands. This course is designed specifically for first-year students.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT151F American Government and Politics (FYS)

An introduction to American national institutions and the policy process, the focus of this course is on the institutions and actors who make, interpret, and enforce our laws: Congress, the presidency, the courts, and the bureaucracy. The course will critically assess the perennial conflict over executive, legislative, and judicial power and the implications of the rise of the administrative state for a democratic order. This course is designed specifically for first-year students.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT155 International Politics

This introduction to international politics applies various theories of state behavior to selected historical cases. Topics include the balance of power, change in international systems, the causes of war and peace, and the role of international law, institutions, and morality in the relations among nations.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT157 Democracy and Dictatorship: Politics in the Contemporary World

In this introduction to politics in industrialized capitalist, state socialist, and developing countries, we explore the meaning of central concepts such as democracy and socialism, the strengths and weaknesses of different kinds of political institutions (e.g., presidentialism vs. parliamentarianism in liberal democratic countries), the causes and consequences of shifts between types of political systems (e.g., transitions from authoritarian rule), and the relations among social, economic, and political changes (e.g., among social justice, economic growth, and political democracy in developing countries).
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT158 Writing the World

How do U.S. newspapers and magazines frame world politics? How adequate is their coverage of ongoing crises and breaking stories around the world? The course will involve reading some classic texts of political journalism and some political novels (such as Orwell's HOMAGE TO CATALONIA and Vargas Llosa's THE FEAST OF THE GOAT). We will also read current articles on contemporary politics from a variety of sources. Students will be assigned to write alternative sources, both reporting and opinion, on current events of their choice. The topics covered will include military conflicts, elections and political crises, and economic stories. We will of course assess the impact of the Web (e.g., blogs, YouTube) on news coverage.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT159 The Moral Basis of Politics

An introduction to upper-level courses in political theory, the course considers the basic moral issues that hedge government and politics: Under what, if any, circumstances ought one to obey the laws and orders of those in power? Is there ever a duty to resist political authority? By what values and principles can we evaluate political arrangements? What are the meanings of terms like freedom, justice, equality, law, community, interests, and rights? How is our vision of the good society to be related to our strategies of political action? What are the roles of organization, leadership, compromise, and violence in bringing about social change? Readings will include political philosophy, plays, contemporary social criticism, and modern social science.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT201 Applied Data Analysis

In this project-based course, you will have the opportunity to answer questions that you feel passionately about through independent research based on existing data. You will develop skills in generating testable hypotheses, conducting a literature review, preparing data for analysis, conducting descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, and presenting research findings. The course offers one-on-one support, ample opportunities to work with other students, and training in the skills required to complete a project of your own design. These skills will prepare you to work in many different research labs across the University that collect empirical data. It is also an opportunity to fulfill an important requirement in several different majors.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-QAC
Identical With: NS&B280, QAC201, SOC257, PSYC280
Prereq: None

GOVT203 American Constitutional Law

This course examines the historical development and constitutional principles of American government including inquiries into federalism, national and state powers, separation of powers, checks and balances, and due process. The primary focus will be on case law of the Supreme Court from the Marshall Court to the present.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT205 The Judicial Process

This course is an introduction to the judicial process in the United States. It introduces students to the nature of legal reasoning and the structure of the legal process, both at the federal and state level. We will examine how the legal process works to resolve private disputes between citizens, how the participants in the process understand their roles, and how the logic of legal reasoning influences not only the participants but the wider community. This is an introductory-level course.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT206 Public Policy

Public policy describes the rules and actions embraced by the government to achieve a variety of social goals. This course will begin with an exploration of the policy process and the challenges of defining problems, designing policies, and implementation. The remainder of the course will be devoted to the examination of several public policy areas, including criminal justice, social welfare, economic policy, and environmental regulation. While attention will focus on U.S. policies, we will routinely consider how they compare with those of other nations. By integrating theoretical literature with more detailed consideration of the origins and development of key domestic policies, the course aims to develop analytical skills and an appreciation for the technical and political complexities of policy making.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: ENVS206
Prereq: GOVT151

GOVT214 Media and Politics

Mass media play a crucial role in American politics, as citizens do not get most of their information about the workings of government from direct experience but rather from mediated stories. This course examines the evolving relationship between political elites, mass media, and the American public.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT215 Congressional Policy Making

This course is an introduction to the politics of congressional policy making--how the way we elect our members of Congress affects the way they perform in Congress. We will focus our attention on changes in the legislative process over the past several decades and how these changes have influenced the relations between members and their constituents, between the two parties, between the House and Senate, and between Congress and the president.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT217 The American Presidency

This course surveys the institutional and political development of the Presidency of the United States. We examine the constitutional framework establishing the executive branch, including the unique manner of presidential election, and analyze the politics of presidential leadership. Topics to be discussed include the presidential nominating and election process, the use and growth of presidential power, the rise of the presidential branch, and the relationship of presidents to other political elites and the party system.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT220 From the Great Depression to the Great Recession: the Political Economy of the Golden Age

Following the tumult of the Great Depression and World War II, the United States entered a period of great prosperity--two decades that combined steady growth, low inflation and unemployment, growing household incomes, and reduced levels of income inequality. Yet, by the mid-1970s, the nation was mired in stagflation and subsequent decades brought a significant departure from the earlier mix of policy commitments. What many now describe as a "golden age" was replaced by a period of stagnant wages, growing inequality, and heightened vulnerability to a host of risks. In this course, we explore the policies and institutions that emerged out of the New Deal, their subsequent erosion, and the factors that limit the options available to contemporary policymakers.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT221 Environmental Policy

This course explores the history of U.S. environmental regulation. We will examine the key features of policy and administration in each major area of environmental policy. Moreover, we will examine several alternatives to public regulation, including free-market environmentalism and association- and standards-based self-regulation. Although the course focuses primarily on U.S. environmental policy, at various points in the course we will draw both on comparative examples and the challenges associated with coordinating national policies and practices on an international level.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: ENVS221
Prereq: None

GOVT232 Campaigns and Elections

This course introduces students to the style and structure of American campaigns and how they have changed over time. We also consider academic theories and controversies surrounding campaign "effects" and whether or not parties, media, campaigns, and elections function as they are supposed to according to democratic theory. Students will read, discuss, and debate classic and new scholarship in the field of political and electoral behavior. This class may also include an exit poll assignment where students help design, field, and analyze a poll conducted on Election Day.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT238 American Political Parties

This course explores the origins, purposes, roles, and consequences of political parties in the American political system. After a brief consideration of the broader theories behind political party systems, we will turn our focus to the party system in the United States. V. O. Key (1964) presented a tripartite definition of political parties that we will use to structure our exploration of parties for the rest of the course: party as organization, party in government, and party in the electorate. In these sections, we will address political party polarization, party identification, parties' fundraising, and many other related topics. From this rich examination of political parties in the U.S. context, we will discuss why parties exist and enable democracy, but also discuss their potential flaws and failures.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT239 Racial and Ethnic Politics

This course is a historical and contemporary examination of the role of race in American politics and the political behavior of African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos in the U.S. Topics will include, but are not limited to, racialization and the persistence of racial segregation in the 21st century, racial and ethnic group identities and consciousness in shaping minority political attitudes and behavior, challenges of minority representation, the role of race in campaigns, and the complex relationship between minorities and America's two major political parties.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: GOVT151

GOVT250 Civil Liberties

This course, the politics of civil liberties, introduces students to a uniquely American contribution (one that other Western democracies have freely emulated) to the practice of politics: the written specification of individual liberties and rights that citizens possess against the state. This is not, however, a course on law. It is, instead, a course in political science that has as its subject the relationship of law to some of the most fundamental questions of politics. Topics covered will include privacy, due process, equal protection, freedom of expression, and freedom of religion.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT252 National Security Law

This course explores the legal questions raised by historical and contemporary national security issues and policies. We will focus on how to approach national security questions by understanding the fundamental legal tenets of national security policies, the analyses used by courts and administrations to confront various intelligence and terrorism issues, and theories of how to balance the interests of national security with civil liberties. Topics covered include presidential power, intelligence collection and covert action, the Fourth Amendment and electronic surveillance, and the detention, interrogation, and trial of suspected terrorists.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT253 The American National Security State

In this course we will focus on the rise of the national security apparatus in the U.S. through the second half of the 20th century. This topic deals with political issues that are often characterized as "intermestic" because they occur at the point of intersection between domestic and international politics. Accordingly, we will examine the ways in which external forces influence internal state-building. We will also consider the choices and implications of policies designed to provide for what President Roosevelt famously called "freedom from fear."
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT270 Comparative Politics of the Middle East

This course provides an overview of the political landscape of the contemporary Middle East and North Africa, focusing on domestic social and political issues. Exploring both the region as a whole and particular case studies, the course examines what accounts for the democratic deficit in the region, how we can understand the Arab Spring, and what challenges and opportunities lie ahead.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT271 Political Economy of Developing Countries

This course explores the political economy of development, with a special focus on poverty reduction. We discuss the meaning of development, compare Latin American to East Asian development strategies (focusing on Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, South Korea, and Taiwan), examine poverty-reduction initiatives in individual countries (including Bangladesh, Chile, and Tanzania), and evaluate approaches to famine prevention and relief. Throughout the course, we pay close attention to the role of procedural democracy, gender relations, market forces, and public action in promoting or inhibiting development.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: CEAS271, LAST271
Prereq: None

GOVT272 South Asian Politics

When India gained independence from British Rule in 1947, democracy was not expected to last in the heterogenous and poor sub-continent. Yet, democracy has thrived in India for almost 70 years and, more recently, other South Asian countries have democratized. What explains this unexpected trend? Is there a connection between colonial legacies and South Asian democratization successes (and failures)? After an overview of caste, religion and language in the region, this course explores South Asian politics by examining the historical and institutional development of democracy in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. In particular, we will examine how the politics of accommodation and good institutional design have affected the persistence of democracy on the sub-continent, and we will also consider relevant policy implications.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT274 Russian Politics

The course begins with a brief review of the dynamics of the Soviet system and the reasons for its collapse in 1991. The traumatic transition of the 1990s raised profound questions about what conditions are necessary for the evolution of effective political and economic institutions. The chaos of the Yeltsin years was followed by a return to authoritarian rule under President Putin, although the long-run stability of the Putin system is also open to question. While the focus of the course is Russia, students will also study the transition process in the other 14 states that came out of the Soviet Union. Topics include political institutions, social movements, economic reforms, and foreign policy strategies.

The course will include a role-playing simulation of Kremlin decision making that will run over several weeks.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: REES280
Prereq: None

GOVT276 Arab Spring and Aftermath

The course explores the complexities of political change in the Middle East and North Africa by narrowing in on the series of protests that became collectively known as the "Arab Spring." Drawing from theories of democratization and contentious politics, the readings examine both general patterns across the region and the political dynamics of individual cases. We will ask, for instance, why authoritarianism has persisted in the Middle East, what explains the variation in protests and in government responses, and what factors shape political reform and the prospects of stability and democratization moving forward. At the same time, we will also follow the turn of events in several key cases such as Tunisia and Syria; attempt to understand what factors led to the gradual progression from euphoria to despair in countries like Egypt, Libya, and Yemen; and reflect on why the revolutionary spark did not catch on in certain countries.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT277 Islamic Movements and Parties

This course examines the diversity of movements and political parties that take Islam as a reference point, and situates these discussions within broader debates around religion and politics. Through a variety of cases spanning from the Middle East and North Africa to Southeast Asia, we will explore the rise and evolution of different types of Islamic movements, and discuss different modes of mobilization, organization and interaction with the state and with other social and political actors. We will examine why some groups form political parties, and how they navigate the tensions between the needs of the party and the mission of the movement. We will consider how Islamic parties impact local and national politics, and in turn how they respond to shifting political terrains and challenges from within. The course will conclude with a reflection on "post-Islamism" and Western attitudes towards Islamic movements.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT278 Nationalism

Nationalism is the desire of an ethnic group, a nation, to have a state of its own. Nationalism emerged as a powerful organizing principle for states and social movements in the 19th century and was integral to the wars and revolutions of the 20th century. This course examines rival theories about the character of nationalism and tries to explain its staying power as a political principle into the 21st century. It looks at the role of nationalism in countries such as the U.S., France, India, China, and Japan, and nationalist conflicts in Northern Ireland, Quebec, Yugoslavia, the former U.S.S.R., and Rwanda. The course is reading- and writing-intensive.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT280 Social and Political Changes in Korea

Korea is currently the only divided country in the world, with two different political systems--democracy and dictatorship. This course explores developments on the Korean peninsula in the modern to contemporary period. We will examine social change, demography, culture, politics, and economy, as well as various social and cultural issues facing Korean society today.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CEAS
Identical With: CEAS160
Prereq: None

GOVT281 Democracy and Social Movements in East Asia

Despite East Asia's reputation for acquiescent populations and weak civil society, the region has been replete with social movements. This course assesses the state of civil society in East Asia by surveying contemporary social movements in the region. We will examine the rise of civil society and its role in political and social changes in both authoritarian and democratic societies in East Asia.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CEAS
Identical With: CEAS205
Prereq: None

GOVT282 African Politics

This course introduces students to contemporary African politics from the colonial period to the present. We analyze independence movements, the rise of authoritarianism, the challenges of economic development, violent conflict, and processes of democratization and nation-building that have shaped the lives of people across the continent. The course also examines persistent themes and theoretical debates including the role of ethnicity and gender, foreign aid, and new forms of protest politics in the social media age. By combining historical and thematic materials, students learn how varied country histories help explain current political institutions, levels of stability and economic opportunity, and modes of social and political participation.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT284 Comparative Politics of Western Europe

The leading nations of Western Europe--Great Britain, France, Germany, and Italy--have developed vibrant economies and stable democracies that differ in important ways from those of the U.S. and from each other. This course explores the ability of European economies to withstand pressures of globalization and the capacity of European democracies to integrate political newcomers such as women and immigrants. We address questions such as, Does New Labour provide a model for parties of the Left across the West, or is its success predicated on the foundations laid by Thatcherism? With the limited ability of the French people to influence politics, should we still consider that country a democracy? Has Germany definitively overcome its Nazi past, or does the strength of German democracy rely on a strong Germany economy? How can we make sense of the Italian "second republic"?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT285 Losers of World War II

This course explores the experiences of Germany and Japan in the postwar era. These countries faced the dual challenge of making political transitions to democratic government and recovering from the economic ruin of World War II. Japan and Germany both were occupied and rebuilt by the United States, and both were blamed for the devastation of the war. How did Japan and Germany respond to being cast as worldwide villains? How strong were the democracies that developed? This course explores these questions by comparing the culture, history, and institutions of these two countries.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: GRST267, CEAS280
Prereq: None

GOVT295 Korean Politics Through Film

This course explores the contemporary politics of Korea. Through course readings, films, and documentaries, we will examine how the tumultuous history of modern Korea has contributed to present political conditions in South and North Korea. Topics covered include Japanese colonialism, the Korean War, modernization, dictatorships, democratization, globalization, and inter-Korean relations.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CEAS
Identical With: CEAS206
Prereq: None

GOVT296 Politics in Japan

This introductory course in politics in Japan begins with an overview of the Japanese political system: its historical origins, institutional structures, and main actors. The course then moves on to explore specific policy areas: industrial and financial policy, labor and social policy, and foreign policy. The course culminates in student research projects presented in an academic conference format of themed panels.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: CEAS296
Prereq: None

GOVT297 Politics and Political Development in the People's Republic of China

Despite the collapse of the U.S.S.R. and Eastern European Communist regimes since 1989, the People's Republic of China (P.R.C.) has retained a one-party regime while it continues its economic reforms begun in 1978, before reforms in other communist counties got under way. In contrast with former communist regimes, the P.R.C. is attempting socialist market reforms while retaining the people's democratic dictatorship under the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party. We will examine the politics of this anomaly, study several public policy areas, and evaluate the potential for China's democratization.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: CEAS297
Prereq: None

GOVT298 Terrorism and Film

This course uses the prism of cinema to address some of the major debates surrounding terrorism. The first part of the course is devoted to understanding terrorism. It explores the root causes of violence as well as the reasons why individuals and organizations turn to to violent tactics. The second part assesses the implications of terrorism for U.S. foreign policy and for the definition of security. Films throughout the course contextualize the theoretical issues and address the question of political violence from alternative perspectives: those of the perpetrators of violence, victims, soldiers, government officials, and police officers. Films will be watched outside of class. Class discussions will address both theoretical issues and the portrayal of terrorism in films.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT302 Latin American Politics

This course explores democracy, development, and revolution in Latin America, with special attention to Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, and Nicaragua. Questions to be addressed include, Why has Argentina lurched periodically from free-wheeling democracy to murderous military rule? Why is authoritarianism usually less harsh, but democracy often more shallow, in Brazil than in Argentina? How democratic are Latin America's contemporary democracies? What accounts for the success or failure of attempted social revolutions in Latin America? Why did postrevolutionary Cuba wind up with a more centrally planned economy and a more authoritarian political system than postrevolutionary Nicaragua? How much progress has each of these countries made toward creating a more affluent, educated, healthy, and equitable society?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: LAST302
Prereq: None

GOVT303 The Evolution of War

While most societies condemn physical violence between individuals, they condone and encourage collectively organized violence in the form of warfare. War is obscene, yet all modern societies have engaged in warfare. This course will examine war as a social, political, and historical phenomenon. We will look at the way in which wars have led to the consolidation of political power and the acceleration of social change, as well as the relationship between military service and the concept of citizenship. The course also examines the crucial role played by technology in the interaction between war and society. Films and novels will be examined to test to what extent these literary works accurately reflect, or obscure, the political, social, and technological logic driving the evolution of war. Our examples will include warfare in premodern society, the gunpowder revolution in early modern Europe and Japan, the American Civil War, colonial wars, World War I, World War II, Vietnam, and Iraq.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT304 Environmental Politics and Democratization

This course explores the role that environmental movements and organizations play in the development and transformation of democratic politics. It examines the political role of environmental movements in nondemocracies, transitioning democracies, and advanced democracies.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: ENVS304, CEAS304
Prereq: None

GOVT306 Land and Conflict in a Global Perspective

For much of the world's population, land sustains livelihoods, shapes identities, and provides a source of investment and security. Yet the centrality of land in everyday life also means that it can become a source of contentious politics and violence. This course explores the meanings that people attach to land, the institutions that affect land access and security, and the mechanisms through which land shapes conflict. We also consider how a close focus on land affects policy debates around issues such as economic development, food security, and post-conflict peacebuilding. The course examines these questions in several country contexts including Kenya, China, Indonesia, Colombia, and Afghanistan. The course is interdisciplinary in its approach and should appeal to students interested in peace and conflict issues, environmental politics, international development, and human rights.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT309 Contemporary Challenges in Latin American Politics

Latin America's contemporary challenges include corruption, crime, economic woes, social policy shortcomings, populism, declining political trust, the erosion of fragile democracies, and the political underrepresentation of women and minority groups. This course examines the historical legacies, international influences, and social-structural factors that shape and constrain how Latin American citizens and governments are responding to these challenges. Weekly readings and discussions, along with a succession of analytic exercises, will prepare students to write a research paper on a Latin American politics topic of their choice.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Identical With: LAST307
Prereq: None

GOVT311 United States Foreign Policy

This course provides a survey of the content and formulation of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the period after World War II. It evaluates the sources of American foreign policy including the international system, societal factors, government processes, and individual decision makers. The course begins with a consideration of major trends in U.S. foreign policy after World War II. With a historical base established, the focus turns to the major institutions and actors in American foreign policy. The course concludes with an examination of the challenges and opportunities that face current U.S. decision makers. A significant component of the course is the intensive discussion of specific foreign policy decisions.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT314 Public Opinion and Foreign Policy

The relationship between leaders and the public remains a core concern of democratic theorists and political observers. This course examines the nature of public views on foreign policy, the ability of the public to formulate reasoned and interconnected perspectives on the issues of the day, and the public's influence on foreign policy decisions with a focus on the U.S. We will consider the role of the media and international events in shaping public perspectives and public attitudes toward important issues such as internationalism and isolationism, the use of force, and economic issues. Finally, the public's influence will be examined across a range of specific decisions. This course provides an intensive examination of a very specific area of research. As such, strong interest in learning about public opinion and foreign policy is recommended.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT315 Policy and War through Film

This course explores how America's policies and wars interact with culture and identity. It combines films and readings to gain a deeper understanding of film as an artifact of culture, war, and identity. The course begins with a discussion of key foundational works to frame a common understanding about strategy, war, and American strategic culture. It then combines film viewings and critical scholarship to discover how the interpretations of America's wars through film shape American citizens' perceptions of war and their military. The films, readings, and seminar discussions will help students develop a better understanding of the differences between the realities and the perceptions of policy and war. This course lies at the intersection of international relations, history, and conflict studies. Participation in this course will increase the students' understanding of how U.S. policy, war, culture, and identity interact. It will also sharpen critical thinking and writing.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Identical With: CSPL315
Prereq: None

GOVT322 Global Environmental Politics

This course examines various perspectives of global environmental politics. Issues covered vary but may include trade-environmental conflicts, environmental justice, climate change, biodiversity, and management of water resources. The course will consider the actors involved in these issues and the design and use of international institutions for managing international cooperation and conflict on these issues.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT324 Africa in World Politics

This course examines Africa's role in world politics beginning with the continent's first modern contacts with Europeans and subsequent colonization. The dominant focus, however, will be on contemporary patterns of international relations, considering how African political actors relate to each other and to the rest of the world--especially China, Europe, and the U.S.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT325 Solving the World's Problems: Decision Making and Diplomacy

This course represents a hands-on approach to decision making and diplomacy. It is designed to allow students to take part in diplomatic and decision-making exercises in the context of international political issues and problems. Important historical decisions will be evaluated and reenacted. In addition, more current international problems that face nations today will be analyzed and decisions will be made on prospective solutions. Finally, various modern-day diplomatic initiatives will be scrutinized and renegotiated.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT326 Political Consulting for International Business

This course is an applied course in political consulting skills for international business. It is designed for students who are directed toward a career in international business. Entry to the course requires a strong track record in prior involvement and or interest in international business. Emphasis will be placed on developing the most important political skills related to working in an international corporation. Learning will take place by applying what has been learned in real-life international business scenarios. The learning goals of this class are based on developing professional skill sets: problem solving abilities, consulting, team work, oral presentations, preparing functional memos, and working in professional environments. The course asks the class to function as a working committee of top executives trying to confront important international business challenges.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT328 Explanations for The Long Peace Since 1945

This course examines great power relations since 1945 through political, economic, legal, institutional and normative lenses.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT329 International Political Economy

This course is an applied introduction to the study of the politics of the major issues of international economic relations today: globalization, trade, monetary relations, imperialism, debt, foreign direct investment, resources and energy, development, international migration, and the environment. Emphasis will be placed on learning about the main issues of international economic relations through reading and discussing issues, but principally by applying what has been learned in real-life scenarios. There will be extensive team work and verbal presentations in this class. The final assignment will be entrepreneurial in nature.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT330 Policy and Strategy in War and Peace

This course explores how the relations, relationships, and discourse between senior national civilian and military leaders influence the development and execution of policy and strategy in war and peace. In theory, the purpose of war is to achieve a political end that sees a better peace. In practice, the nature of war is to serve itself if it is not influenced and constrained by continuous discourse and analysis associated with good civil-military relations between senior leaders. This course begins with discussion of the key foundational works to build a common understanding. It then explores how civil-military interaction influenced strategy in war and peace for each decade from the Vietnam War to the present. The readings and seminar discussions also examine how the outcomes of wars influenced civil-military relations and the subsequent peace or wars. This course lies at the intersection of international relations, history, and conflict studies. Students will gain greater understanding of how U.S. policy makers, strategy, and war interact, while honing their critical thinking and writing skills.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Identical With: CSPL330
Prereq: None

GOVT331 International Law

International law plays an increasingly important role in global politics.This course will examine the interaction of law and politics at the international level and how each influences the other. The course will examine the sources of international law; the roles played by international organizations such as the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, and the International Criminal Court; and the roles played by various participants in global governance, including both state and nonstate actors. We will focus on several key issue areas, such as human rights, economic governance, the use of force, war crimes, and terrorism. Today it is impossible to completely grasp global politics without an understanding of international law; this course is offered to bridge that gap.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT332 Psychology and International Politics

Trust, personality, reputation, honor, emotions. These concepts are at the heart of international decision making. This course will address research in psychology and political science related to these topics that helps us understand how leaders behave toward other nations and why, for instance, they engage in conflict or acquire nuclear weapons.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT333 International Organization

Nations have increasingly attempted to manage their interdependence through the use of international organizations. This course represents a systematic study of these organizations: their structures, impact, success, and failure. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing competing theories of international organization and evaluating current debates over the performance of these organizations in today's most important international issue areas: security, economic efficiency, economic redistribution, human rights, hunger, health, and the environment.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: GOVT155

GOVT334 International Security in a Changing World

Although we no longer fear the central threat of global nuclear war that infused the Cold War, we now face myriad threats that appear to belie easy solutions. This course considers alternative ways to conceive of international security and how differences in these perspectives can affect our response to international threats. The course focuses on the relationship between force and international security; the prospects for peace and conflict in specific regions of the world such as Asia, Latin America, and Africa; and some vexing issues such as terrorism, nuclear proliferation, nationalism and ethnic conflict, economics, environmental issues, and disease.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT335 Territory and Conflict

Conflicts over territory are among the most contentious and intractable in international relations. In this course, students will develop an understanding of when, why, and how territory has played a role in the history of international conflict and explore how the role of territory in conflict has changed over time.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT337 Virtue and Glory: Classical Political Theory

How shall we think about public life, our "life of common involvements"? This course is a survey of premodern political theories, with attention to their major theoretical innovations, historical contexts, and contemporary relevance. Major themes will include the nature of political community and its relation to the cultivation of virtue, the relation of politics to economics, the origin of the ideas of law and justice, and the relation between knowledge and power and between politics and salvation. Readings will include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Alfarabi, Maimonides, Aquinas, and Machiavelli.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT338 Modern Political Theory

This course surveys major thinkers in political philosophy in Europe from the 17th to 19th centuries. Attention is given to the historical context of thinkers, their influence on one another, and the contemporary relevance of their thought. Topics addressed will include the relation among philosophy, language, and politics; the meaning and foundations of rights; the notion of property; the idea of social contract; the ideas of state sovereignty and individual autonomy; the role of reason in politics; the role of nature and natural law in politics; the concepts of liberty, equality, and justice; the idea of representation; the meaning of liberalism and the relationship between liberalism and democracy; the role of toleration; and the relation among identity, recognition, and politics.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT339 Contemporary Political Theory

How shall we get along? This course examines some important 20th-century theories of politics. Major issues include the role of reason and emotion in grounding the basic principles of our political lives, the conceptual foundations of liberal and civic republican democracy, and critiques of liberalism from communitarian, critical theory, and postmodern perspectives. We will explore what political theory can be today. This course, together with GOVT337 and GOVT338, provides a survey of major Western political theories; at least two of these courses are recommended for students concentrating in political theory.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT340 Global Justice

This course examines the moral and political issues that arise in the context of international politics. Is the use of violence by states limited by moral rules, and is there such a thing as a just war? Are there human rights that all states must respect? Should violation of those rights be adjudicated in the international courts? Are states justified in enforcing such rights beyond their own borders? Is a system of independent states morally legitimate? What, if any, are the grounds on which states can claim freedom from interference by other states and actors in their internal affairs? Must all legitimate states be democracies? Do states and/or individuals have an obligation to provide assistance to foreign states and citizens? Are there any requirements of international distributive justice?
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT343 Political Representation

With national political campaigns heating up, it's a good time to ask, Why do we have political representation? Is it inferior to direct democracy? Is a representative supposed to stand and act for the people who elected him or her, for the party platform, for the entire constituency, or for his or her own conscience about what is right? We will read theoretical and empirical works on America and other countries and study social movements and political parties as key mediating institutions. We will ask how representation connects the individual to governing and to sovereignty, citizenship, identity, and community. And, how do new forms of democratic representation contribute to regime change?
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT344 Religion and Politics

The Islamic State movement challenges state borders and the separation of mosque and state. Can theocracy be justified in political theory? In contrast, how can an organized religion accept public constitutional boundaries and rule? Can the concepts of law in religion and politics be reconciled? Should church and state be separate, and if so, how? How has religion affected political institutions, and, in turn, been affected by them? Which religious values are compatible with democracy, and which ones go beyond democracy? We will explore the relation of three monotheisms--Judaism, Christianity, and Islam--to political life in nation-states and empires through theoretical and empirical readings from ancient, medieval, and modern times.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT345 Citizenship and Immigration

This course examines the concept of citizenship and explores its connection to immigration, ideas of membership, political rights, and processes of incorporation as well as integration. Some of the core questions we will pursue include: What responsibilities do liberal democracies have to immigrants? How should we conceive of citizenship? Should we think of citizenship as a formal political and legal status? As an entitlement to a set of rights? As active participation in self-governance? As an identity? Or, something else entirely? How have racial, ethnic, gender, and class identities and hierarchies shaped the access people have to rights and formal membership? Finally, we will evaluate how political thinkers have argued for the inclusion and exclusion of immigrants into the political community. Most of our readings for the term will be drawn from legal theorists and political philosophers; we will also read some work by historians, political scientists, and sociologists for historical context and background.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT346 Foundations of Civic Engagement

The promise of democracy is that citizens can act together to shape the conditions of their collective lives. This class examines that promise, focusing on the ways in which civic engagement can contribute to its realization. We examine civic engagement both as a theoretical perspective on citizen participation and an active practice. What does it mean to have a truly democratic society? What is the role of citizen participation, both within formal political activity and in civil society generally? What role should experts play in democratic politics, and how can expertise be squared with democratic equality? What, if any, responsibility does the University have to promote civic engagement?
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: CSPL201
Prereq: None

GOVT348 Justice and Equality

To what extent and in what ways does justice require that people have (roughly) equal life prospects? That issue has become increasingly urgent as inequality has increased rapidly during the last 40 years or so. Although inequality in the US has grown faster than in most other (already developed) countries, the increase in inequality is widespread. At the same time, at the global level there has been a reduction of inequality as economic growth has delivered hundreds of millions of people from deep poverty. This class will examine the relationship between equality and justice. Our principal concern will be to assess how, in what ways, and among whom justice requires equality, but we will also look at the dynamics of inequality--how inequality has developed historically, the factors explaining the recent surge of inequality within countries while equality of life prospects has lessened globally, how growing inequality may be affecting domestic politics, and the policies that could address the issue of equality.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT349 Resistance and Revolution

What is a political revolution and how do you know? What is distinctive about political resistance, and when do such acts succeed in expanding human freedom? Students in this course will read great works in political theory on the concepts of human resistance and political revolution. Examining cases such as the French Revolution, India's independence movement, the Algerian War, and the Revolutions of 1989 in Eastern Europe, we will ask how various theories of revolution, resistance, and regime change shaped political debate in the public and private spheres. Core thinkers we will examine include Hannah Arendt, Emmanuel-Joseph Sieyès, Edmund Burke, Olympe de Gouges, Václav Havel, Albert Camus, and Mahatma Gandhi. This course prompts students to explore the historical contexts in which the respective authors produced their texts and to consider the ways in which their ideas of resistance and revolution emerged from their political landscapes.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT352 Deception and Democracy

What's the best way to tell if a politician is lying? According to the punchline of this old joke, you should simply determine whether their lips are moving. This course will undertake a more complex and nuanced analysis of political deception and democratic government. Is lying for political gain undemocratic? What ethical duties and obligations befall representatives and citizens within a democracy? Where do we draw the line between persuasion and deception? By examining the philosophical treatment and historical practice of political deception - from Plato's Myth of the Metals to Donald Trump's illusory trade deficit with Canada - we will broaden our understanding of various participatory, deliberative, and epistemic forms of democracy and their procedural and substantive commitments.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT355 Political Theory and Transitional Justice

Transitional justice refers to the variety of legal, political, and social processes that occur as a society rebuilds after war; it includes war crimes trials, truth commissions, and the creation of memorials. Although the term "transitional justice" is a recent one, the philosophical issues contained within it are at the core of political philosophy. What kind of society is best? What is the relationship between political institutions and human nature? What does justice mean? The purpose of this course is to understand the issues of transitional justice from both practical and philosophical perspectives and will include case studies of World War II, South African apartheid, and the genocide in Rwanda.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT366 Empirical Methods for Political Science

This course is an introduction to the concepts, tools, and methods used in the study of political phenomena, with an emphasis on both the practical and theoretical concerns involved in scientific research. Designed to get students to think like social scientists, the course covers topics in research design, hypotheses generation, concept/indicator development, data collection, quantitative and qualitative analysis, and interpretation. Students will become better critical consumers of arguments made in mass media, scholarly journals, and political debates. The course is especially appropriate for juniors who are considering writing a thesis in government.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: GOVT151 OR GOVT155 OR GOVT157 OR GOVT159

GOVT367 Political Science by the Numbers

This course covers the basics of probability theory and statistics. The main purpose of this course is to promote the understanding of statistical concepts and how these concepts can be used to make inferences about the political world. Topics include probability distributions, correlation analysis, linear regression, generalized linear models, maximum likelihood, logistic regression, causal inference, experiments, and non-parametric modeling. Lectures will mainly cover theory, while readings will connect the concepts described during lecture to problems in political science. Whenever possible, the instructor will draw upon research in political science to illustrate the why and how of a given concept or technique. Demonstrations will allow students to "play around" with abstract statistical concepts. Most lectures will have an interactive component involving class participation. Problem sets will cover some of the more technical aspects of what we discuss in class along with applications using real data.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: QAC302
Prereq: None

GOVT369 Political Psychology

This course explores the political psychology of individual judgment and choice. We will examine the role of cognition and emotions, values, predispositions, and social identities on judgment and choice. From this approach, we will address the larger debate regarding the quality of democratic citizenship.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT370 The Scope and Limits of U.S. Executive Power

This course will analyze the executive powers wielded by the President of the United States. Throughout the course we will examine the history of social, political, and legal conflicts and compromise that has shaped the current scope and limits of presidential power. We will be discussing a variety of topics including executive orders, the president's war powers, executive privilege, clemency, and the veto power.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT372 Political Communication in Polarized Environments

Polarization in American politics heightens the communication challenges for those seeking to persuade, whether they be public officials, scientists, or citizens. This seminar will provide an in depth look at the barriers to persuasive communication and information dissemination in the age of polarization and what (if anything) is effective in cutting through partisan predispositions.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT373 Congressional Reform

The modern Congress is often criticized for being too partisan, inefficient, and beholden to special interests. This seminar will examine the development of the modern Congress by focusing on the history of congressional reform. We will also evaluate proposals for reforming the modern Congress to remedy potential shortcomings in the lawmaking and ethics process.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT374 Seminar in American Political Economy and Public Policy

This seminar will explore the role of crisis in policy change. After exploring the theoretical debates on political economic and institutional change, we will examine in detail the impact of crisis in the past century. We will focus particular attention on the Great Depression, the stagflation of the 1970s, and the recent financial crisis. In each case, crisis forced a reappraisal of accepted economic and political theories, scrutiny of existing institutions, and efforts (successful and unsuccessful) to introduce new policies and institutions.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT375 American Political Development

This is a course about the big questions in American politics. What is it all about? What does it mean to be living under a text written more than two centuries ago? Is the very concept of development an oxymoron for constitutional government? This course introduces students to a scholarship and a method of analysis that melds the historical with the institutional, applied to understanding the evolving state/society relationship in American political life. We will examine the ways in which developing state institutions constrain and enable policy makers; the ways in which ideas and policy-relevant expertise have impacted the development of new policies; the ways in which societal interests have been organized and integrated into the policy process; and the forces that have shaped the evolution of institutions and policies over time. This seminar will provide an opportunity to survey the literature drawn from several theoretical perspectives in the field and to consider competing arguments and hypotheses concerning the development of the American state and its changing role in the economy and society.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT376 Political Polarization in America

In the 1950s, political scientists feared that weak parties in the U.S. threatened democratic accountability. Today, many political scientists argue strong, ideologically extreme parties distort representation. Undoubtedly, things have changed, but why? Several possible culprits exist, including partisan gerrymandering, primary elections, the ideological realignment of the electorate, and changing congressional procedures. We will cover the possible explanations and try to decipher what explanation, or combination of explanations, is most convincing. While we evaluate the arguments for why polarization has increased we will also debate the merits and drawbacks of strong parties at the elite level. Finally, we will examine to what extent polarization among elected officials and activists reflects polarization in the public.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT377 American Political Thought

This course will provide students with a thorough discussion of the main currents of American political thought. We will explore a selection of key texts and speeches that have helped to shape American political culture. Beginning with the Founders and ending with the contemporary era, we will cover moments of critical change between then and now. We focus on the intellectual battles of the past because, apart from being rewarding in themselves, they help us to think critically about contemporary politics. Accordingly, this course will emphasize how ideas give rise to individual identities, how they motivate political actors, and how they explain political outcomes.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT378 Advanced Topics in Media Analysis

Government, corporations, campaigns, nonprofits, other organized interests, and sometimes individuals have a vested interest in knowing and reacting to media messages that affect them. To do so, they need information on what is being said, in what venue, by whom, and with what effect. This seminar will provide hands-on, in-depth experience with academic research involving media, including the type of advertising analysis conducted by the Wesleyan Media Project team. Students will be involved in various aspects of research, including data collection, data coding, literature reviews, data analysis and visualization, and writing/editing.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: GOVT151 OR GOVT155 OR GOVT157

GOVT379 The Politics and Theory of the First Amendment

This course will examine the historical origins, philosophical foundations, and case law of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: GOVT203 OR GOVT250

GOVT380 Place and Politics

This course examines the importance of place in shaping American politics at the mass and elite levels. Topics will include, but are not limited to, racial segregation in the American South, white flight, immigration, gentrification, and the impact of increasing levels of diversity on national and local politics. Throughout the course, we will cover key theories in intergroup relations and how they apply to each phenomenon.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT381 The Political Economy of Oil

This course examines the strategic, political, and economic aspects of the global oil and gas industry. On one side is the United States as the dominant energy consumer, for whom securing oil supplies has been a major strategic priority since the 1930s. On the other side are a variety of producer countries, for whom oil has brought wealth but also political instability and conflict. Political scientists actively debate the impact of oil on the prospects for democracy and economic development. It is also important to understand the structure of the industry and the goals of the corporations that make it up. Students will complete case studies of individual producer countries and oil companies. The cases selected will cover the whole range--the Middle East (e.g., Saudi Arabia, Iran), Russia and Central Asia, and developing countries (e.g., Venezuela, Nigeria)--not to forget other cases such as Norway and Trinidad. We will also examine the phenomenon of peak oil and the rise of natural gas and other fuels.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT383 Democracy and Development in India

Much has been written and said about the link between democracy and religious/ethnic fragmentation. When India gained independence from British Rule in 1947, many observed that the likelihood of the new country remaining democratic was limited. Yet, democracy has thrived in India for almost 70 years. Other South Asian countries have recently followed suit. How do countries with multiple social, economic, ethnic, and linguistic cleavages manage democracy and what is the connection between their successes (and failures) in this area and the persistence of widespread poverty? This course focuses on the "politics of accommodation" in South Asia, examining institutions, elite bargaining, the deployment of force, accommodation of regional leaders and their political aspirations, and the constant reconfiguration of caste, party, and religious alliances to explain why Indian politics in particular is often dominated by social accommodation rather than the amelioration of poverty. In addition to focusing on India, we will examine a number of comparative cases from elsewhere in South Asia.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT385 Women and Politics

In this course we will study a variety of topics related to the theme of women and politics: women's political participation, the gender gap, women in political parties, female leadership, and women's issues. Because women's political engagement is affected by their position in society and in the economy, we will also study topics such as inequality, power, discrimination, and labor force participation. Although we will consider these issues in the U.S., our approach will be strongly cross-national.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: FGSS386
Prereq: None

GOVT386 The Nuclear Age in World Politics

This course examines the role of nuclear weapons in world politics. Why do states acquire nuclear weapons? What are they good for? Do nuclear weapons make weak states more secure by leveling the playing field, or less secure by making them targets for annihilation? Are nuclear weapons a force for stability or instability? Are missile defenses defensive or offensive? Are these weapons still relevant, or is it time to rethink their usefulness? Topics include rational and extended deterrence, strategic doctrine, nuclear superiority, the stability-instability paradox, nuclear proliferation, rogue states, nuclear terrorism, missile defense, and Cold War crises.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT387 Foreign Policy at the Movies

Recent research on public opinion has suggested that public attitudes about foreign affairs are informed by many non-news sources. This course examines the messages and information provided by movies with significant foreign affairs content. The questions considered are, What are the messages about international politics sent by the movies? Are these messages consistent with the understanding of the events and processes within the political science literature? What are the implications of movies and the information they provide for democratic governance? Students will watch the movies outside of class. Class periods will be devoted equally to discussion of the political science concepts and their portrayal in films.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT388 Democracy and Development in Latin America

This seminar examines democracy, economic development, and social welfare policy in Latin America. The topics to be addressed include regime classification, populism and neo-populism, the recent rise of the left, women in politics, the political economy of economic growth and human development, the export of natural resources, the recent decline of income inequality, the history of social welfare policy in the region, and recent social policy innovations including conditional cash transfer programs.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: LAST388
Prereq: None

GOVT389 The Global Village: Globalization in the Modern World

Globalization is considered by many to be the most powerful transformative force in the modern world system. Modernization and technology, which are greater today than at any time in history, have effectively made the world a smaller place with respect to the interdependence and interpenetration among nations. But while most agree on the transformative power of globalization, many disagree on its nature and its effects on modern society. Liberals hail globalization as the ultimate means to world peace and prosperity. Marxists see it as a means of reinforcing the inequality and unbalanced division of labor created by modern capitalism. Still others, such as mercantilists and nationalists, see it as a source of political instability and cultural conflict. This course analyzes globalization principally through this tripartite theoretical lens. It traces its origins and its evolution across the 19th and 20th centuries. It also tries to determine the impact of globalization on the most important issues of international relations today: on domestic and international political systems and on social, cultural, and international economic relations. Through analytical, critical, and theoretical approaches, the course attempts to ascertain the nature and impact of globalization and ultimately shed light on the fundamental question: To what extent is globalization a force for good and evil in the modern world system?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT390 Presidential Foreign Policy Decision Making

In the realm of foreign policy, good choices can avoid or win wars, while poor choices can lead to disaster. Although analysts consistently evaluate the quality of U.S. presidential foreign policy decision making, the fundamental aspects of good and poor judgment remain controversial. With a focus on the U.S. presidency since World War II, this course starts with a consideration of the effects of both individual character and decision-making processes in determining the quality of foreign policy choices. The majority of the course focuses on these issues through the intensive discussion of case studies written by the students in the course.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT391 Legacies of Authoritarian Politics

This course explores the challenges and legacies faced by new democracies due to their authoritarian pasts. To examine legacies of authoritarian politics, we will first study the key features of authoritarian vs. democratic states. The second part will look at "life after dictatorship" including authoritarian successor parties, political participation, civic engagement, and policing in the post-authoritarian era.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CEAS
Identical With: CEAS385
Prereq: None

GOVT392 Theorizing the City

Recent years have brought a shift to imagining the city, rather than the nation-state, as the primary allegiance for citizens, with its own unique set of challenges and responsibilities. What are our political and ethical obligations to the strangers we live near? Should cities be governed more democratically? This course will examine topics such as income inequality, environmental justice, immigration, localism vs. cosmopolitanism, and public art.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT395 Justice

A widely held view of justice in modern political thinking is premised on some conception of human equality, including equal consideration of everyone's interests, and a commitment to a system of equal and extensive basic rights. In the first part of the class we will examine this conception of justice, with special attention to Rawls's formulation of modern liberal theory in his later work. During the rest of the term we will critically assess this account of justice. The central question we will address is whether this theory has the conceptual resources to address the major issues of contemporary society. The issues we will consider are class or economic inequality, democracy and democratic participation, and whether a "scheme of equal basic liberties" can be "fully adequate" to deal with issues of difference with respect to culture, gender, race, and religion.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT396 Politics, Freedom and Biology

Biological processes, the natural world, and the human condition have long inspired political thinkers, from Aristotle to the present. This course takes up important ethical and political questions of human freedom that derive from our human capacities and character. We will examine contemporary philosophical problems in four areas: bioethics; biotechnology, especially as related to reproductive technologies; discourses in human freedom and ecology; and the science of judgment and cognition. Texts will include selections from Aristotle, Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, Saba Mahmood, Allen Buchanan, and William Connolly.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT397 Acting and Citizenship

From Plato's fears about the corrupting effects of tragedy on the civic devotion of citizens, to Rousseau's concerns about the theater as the cause of moral decay, to Richard Sennett's contemporary arguments for an understanding of citizenship as a performance in the "theatrum mundi," the performance and spectacle of theater, through both watching and in acting, has been closely linked to expectations of democratic citizenship. This course will examine the history of acting as a way to consider what we are called to do to sustain democratic life. How is being a citizen or a juror the equivalent of playing a role? Can the practice of acting help develop skills of empathy and deliberation that are needed to navigate difficult political questions? On the other hand, can the "inauthenticity" of acting be a corrosive parallel that treats all civic interactions as strategic ones grounded in self-interest? Drawing on texts from the history of political thought, theater studies, and the psychology of acting, the course will culminate in a performance art piece at Wesleyan, developed by the class, to highlight the demands of citizenship. A willingness to act is expected, but no experience is required.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT398 What Is the Good Life?

Work, political participation, friendship, art, and justice: These are the components that political philosophers have long thought to be components of a life well lived. How do these practices shape our identity and relationships with others? How do they contribute to a thriving society? How have theorists changed our understandings of these core concepts over time? What happens when they come into conflict? This course will use these five categories to understand what the "good life" means from ancient, modern, and postmodern perspectives.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT399 Citizens, Judges, Juries: Who Decides in Democracy?

The tensions between rule by the people, rule by elites, and rule of law are at the core of democratic theory. What is the proper balance among the three? Under what circumstances is one group of decision makers better than another? What happens when they come into conflict? This is an upper-level course in political theory designed for students who have taken GOVT159, The Moral Basis of Politics or an equivalent course in philosophy and related disciplines. We will focus on the following topics: the role of voting in liberal democracies, the Athenian jury system, deliberative democracy, referendum and initiatives, civil disobedience, and the role of juries in the U.S. criminal justice system.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Prereq: None

GOVT401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GOVT402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GOVT407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

GOVT408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

GOVT409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GOVT410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GOVT411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GOVT412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GOVT419 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

GOVT420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

GOVT465 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GOVT466 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GOVT468 Independent Study, Undergraduate

Credit may be earned for an independent study during a summer or authorized leave of absence provided that (1) plans have been approved in advance, and (2) all specified requirements have been satisfied.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GOVT469 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

GOVT470 Independent Study, Undergraduate

Credit may be earned for an independent study during a summer or authorized leave of absence provided that (1) plans have been approved in advance, and (2) all specified requirements have been satisfied.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

GOVT491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GOVT492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GOVT495 Research Apprentice, Undergraduate

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

GOVT496 Research Apprentice, Undergraduate

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U