Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

The Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (FGSS) Program is administered by the chair and other members of the program’s core faculty. Core faculty are those who are actively involved in the program, who teach FGSS courses, advise FGSS majors and senior theses, and may serve as program chair. The program sponsors an annual symposium and the Diane Weiss Memorial Lecture.

Faculty

Victoria Pitts-Taylor
BA, Ohio University; PHD, Brandeis University
Professor of Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Chair, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Professor, Science in Society; Professor, Sociology

Affiliated Faculty

Abigail Huston Boggs
BA, Wesleyan University; PHD, University Calif Davis
Assistant Professor of Sociology; Assistant Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Katherine Brewer Ball
BA, Occidental College; MA, New York University; PHD, New York University
Assistant Professor of Theater; Assistant Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Assistant Professor, African American Studies

Lisa Cohen
BA, Brown University; MPHIL, Yale University; PHD, Yale University
Douglas J. and Midge Bowen Bennet Associate Professor of English; Associate Professor of English; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Christina Crosby
BA, Swarthmore College; MAA, Wesleyan University; PHD, Brown University
Professor of English; Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Megan H. Glick
BA, Northwestern University; MA, Yale University; MPHIL, Yale University; PHD, Yale University
Associate Professor of American Studies; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Associate Professor, Science in Society; Coordinator, Disability Studies

Laura Grappo
BA, Wesleyan University; MA, Yale University; MPHIL, Yale University; PHD, Yale University
Assistant Professor of American Studies; Assistant Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Lori Gruen
BA, University of Colorado Boulder; PHD, University of Colorado Boulder
William Griffin Professor of Philosophy; Professor of Philosophy; Professor, Science in Society; Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Coordinator, Animal Studies

Kerwin Kaye
BA, University of Colorado Boulder; MA, University San Francisco; PHD, New York University
Associate Professor of Sociology; Tutor, College of Social Studies; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Natasha Korda
BA, Columbia University; PHD, Johns Hopkins University
Professor of English; Director, Center for the Humanities; Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Hari Krishnan
BA, University of Manitoba; MFA, York University; PHD, Texas Womans University
Associate Professor of Dance; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Elizabeth McAlister
BA, Vassar College; MA, Yale University; MA, Yale University; MPHIL, Yale University; PHD, Yale University
Professor of Religion; Chair, African American Studies; Professor, African American Studies; Professor, American Studies; Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Jill G. Morawski
BA, Mount Holyoke College; MA, Carleton University; MAA, Wesleyan University; PHD, Carleton University
Willbur Fisk Osborne Professor of Natural Science; Professor of Psychology; Chair, Psychology; Professor, Science in Society; Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Catherine Poisson
BA, Sorbonne; MA, New York University; PHD, New York University
Associate Professor of French; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Gabrielle Piedad Ponce-Hegenauer
BA, University of Illinois Urbana; MFA, Johns Hopkins University; PHD, Johns Hopkins University
Assistant Professor of Letters; Assistant Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Patricia M Rodriguez Mosquera
BA, Autonoma University of Madrid; MA, Autonoma University of Madrid; PHD, University of Amsterdam
Professor of Psychology; Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Mary-Jane Victoria Rubenstein
BA, Williams College; MA, Columbia University; MPHIL, Cambridge University; MPHIL, Columbia University; PHD, Columbia University
Professor of Religion; Professor, Science in Society; Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Ashraf H.A. Rushdy
BA, University of Alberta; MA, University of Alberta; PHD, Cambridge University
Benjamin Waite Professor of the English Language; Professor of African American Studies; Professor of English; Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Anu (Aradhana) Sharma
BA, Eugene Lang College; MA, Columbia University; MA, Stanford University; PHD, Stanford University
Associate Professor of Anthropology; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Elise Springer
BA, Wesleyan University; MA, University of Connecticut; PHD, University of Connecticut
Associate Professor of Philosophy; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Elizabeth G. Traube
BA, Radcliffe College; MA, Harvard University; MAA, Wesleyan University; PHD, Harvard University
Professor of Anthropology; Chair, Anthropology; Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Jennifer Tucker
BA, Stanford University; MPHIL, Cambridge University; PHD, Johns Hopkins University
Associate Professor of History; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Associate Professor, Environmental Studies; Associate Professor, Science in Society

Laura Ann Twagira
BA, Wellesley College; MA, Sarah Lawrence College; PHD, Rutgers University
Assistant Professor of History; Assistant Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Gina Athena Ulysse
BA, Upsala College; MA, University of Michigan; PHD, University of Michigan
Professor of Anthropology; Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Roman Utkin
MA, Kazan State University; MPHIL, Yale University; PHD, Yale University
Assistant Professor of Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies; Assistant Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Kari Weil
BA, Cornell University; MA, Princeton University; PHD, Princeton University
University Professor of Letters; University Professor, Environmental Studies; University Professor, College of the Environment; University Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Co-Coordinator, Animal Studies

Margot Weiss
BA, University of Chicago; MA, Duke University; PHD, Duke University
Associate Professor of Anthropology; Associate Professor of American Studies; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Coordinator, Queer Studies

Sarah E. Wiliarty
BA, Harvard University; MA, University of California, Berkeley; PHD, University of California, Berkeley
Associate Professor of Government; Tutor, College of Social Studies; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Associate Professor, German Studies

Su Zheng
BA, Central Conservatory of Music; MA, New York University; PHD, Wesleyan University
Associate Professor of Music; Associate Professor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Associate Professor, East Asian Studies

Department Advising Expert

Jennifer Tucker

FGSS115F Reporting from the Inside: Journalism, Activism, and Intimacy (FYS)

What is the role of the reporter in today's divided and divisive America? While one approach has been to dip into the lives of others, get the story, and get out, this class will focus on pursuing the deeply human stories that matter most to you, guided by your own experience so that you can intimately connect with your subjects, your world, and yourself. From Black Lives Matter to the #MeToo movement to LGBTQ and Trans Rights, we are seeing writers and activists reporting events in real time, as they happen to and around them, celebrating the journalist as participant. This is hardly a new phenomenon. Many major historical moments--the Great Depression, the fight for Civil Rights and Women's Rights, the AIDS crisis--have had reporters on the inside, covering their own communities. In this First Year Seminar, students will immerse themselves in this kind of "intimate reporting" and its historical contexts, and also create a newsroom of their own design: learning the fundamentals of journalism through story idea meetings, research, and interview strategies; editing and fact-checking techniques; social media engagement; and pitching their work. Students will leave the class with a portfolio of writing that explores, from their own points of view, issues of gender, class, race, and sexuality.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Prereq: None

FGSS117F Social Norms and Social Power (FYS)

This FYS is an interdisciplinary exploration of the privileges and penalties associated with "the normal" in the United States. We will think through the intersections of queerness, race, ethnicity, class, disability, and gender in terms of social power, drawing on novels, ethnographies, memoirs, and films. Throughout, we will pay particular attention to the ways bodily difference and social identity interarticulate with "normalness" to locate individuals within hierarchical power structures, and we will think creatively about ways to challenge this.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST117F
Prereq: None

FGSS118 Reproduction in the 21st Century

This course will cover basic human reproductive biology, new and future reproductive and contraceptive technologies, and the ethics raised by reproductive issues.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-BIOL
Identical With: BIOL118, PHIL118, SISP118
Prereq: None

FGSS123 Love, Sex, and Marriage in Renaissance Europe

This writing-intensive seminar will compare literary and artistic depictions of love, sex, and marriage during the Renaissance by authors and artists from England, Spain, France, Flanders, Germany, and Italy. We will read both male and female writers in genres ranging from poetry, the short story, and theater to the essay, the travel narrative, and the sermon. We will also examine other arts such as painting, sculpture, and the decorative arts (e.g., wedding chests). Questions we will explore include, but are not limited to, How were love and marriage related during the Renaissance? What role did sex, gender, and violence play in relationships between couples and within society? How do gender and genre affect the ways in which love, sex, and marriage are depicted? How did cultural differences influence writers' and artists' interpretations of love, sex, and marriage? And what about same-sex unions? Other topics will include virginity and celibacy, erotic literature, family and class structures, and divorce.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: RL&L123, COL123, MDST125
Prereq: None

FGSS130F Thinking Animals: An Introduction to Animal Studies (FYS)

The question of "the animal" has become a recent focus across the disciplines, extending debates over identity and difference to our so-called nonspeaking others. This course will examine a range of theories and representations of the animal to examine how human identity and its various gendered, classed, and racial manifestations have been conceived of through and against notions of animality, as well as how such conceptions have affected human-animal relations and practices such as pet-keeping and zoos. We will seek to understand the desire to tame or objectify animals as well as evidence of a contrasting desire that they remain guardians of inaccessible experience and knowledge. Readings may include Darwin, Poe, Kafka, Mann, Woolf, Coetzee, and Hearne.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-COL
Identical With: COL130F
Prereq: None

FGSS164F Hurting (FYS)

This course examines representations of harm (both received and enacted) at the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality. Through engagement with both artistic and social movements, we will explore questions about the ethics of representing pain. How do artists navigate depicting pain without simply reproducing violence? What constitutes an effective apology? (How) can complexly narrating the harm one has inflicted on others offer a reckoning rather than an excuse? How might we consider the relationship between identity and formal artistic choices, and how might such considerations open onto a more rigorous engagement of the social spaces texts make? How might we imagine and enact ecologies of care in the midst of ongoing histories of harm? We will consider these questions across media and genre and amidst structured self-reflection.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Prereq: None

FGSS175F Staging America: Modern American Drama (FYS)

Can modern American drama--as cultural analysis--teach us to reread how America ticks? Together we will explore this question as we read and discuss some of the most provocative classic and uncanonized plays written between the 1910s and the present. Plays by Susan Glaspell, Eugene O'Neill, Mike Gold, workers theater troupes, Clifford Odets, Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Amiri Baraka, Arthur Kopit, Ntozake Shange, Luis Valdez, David Mamet, Tony Kushner, Ayad Akhtar, and others will help us think about what's at stake in staging America and equip us as cultural analysts, critical thinkers, close readers of literature, and imaginative historians of culture and theater. This seminar will introduce first-year students to the kind of critical thinking developed in majors such as English; American Studies; African American Studies; Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; College of Letters; Theater Studies; and the Social and Cultural Theory Certificate.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL175F, AMST125F, COL125F, AFAM152F, THEA172F
Prereq: None

FGSS200 Sex/Gender in Critical Perspective (FGSS Gateway)

Feminist, gender and sexuality studies is an exciting interdisciplinary field that addresses gender, sex, and sexuality as well as related issues of race, class, nation, and citizenship across multiple disciplines, epistemologies, methods, and vantage points. At its most fundamental, the field addresses how persons are identified and identify themselves as similar to and different from each other and the relation of these categories of difference to power relations. The study of feminist and queer thought on sex/gender and sexuality offers a critical lens through which to examine social structures and social problems, inequality, difference and diversity, identity and the self, belonging and community, and the possibility of social change, among other topics. This course will offer a broad introduction to the field and provide a foundation for further study of specific areas of interest. The primary goals are to (1) explore the multiple ways feminist and queer scholars have understood sex, gender, and sexuality; (2) explore different methods and styles of feminist thought and expression; (3) situate these in time and place, with attention to historical and cultural contexts; and (4) explore the intersections of sex, gender, and sexuality with race, nation, and other categories of difference. The course will cover aspects of first-wave feminism (e.g., suffrage and the abolitionist movement); second-wave feminism and critical theories of sex/gender; and contemporary feminism, including queer theory, intersectionality and race, and transnational and postcolonial feminism.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Prereq: None

FGSS200F Sex/Gender in Critical Perspective (FGSS Gateway)(FYS)

Feminist, gender and sexuality studies is an exciting interdisciplinary field that addresses gender, sex, and sexuality as well as related issues of race, class, nation, and citizenship across multiple disciplines, epistemologies, methods, and vantage points. At its most fundamental, the field addresses how persons are identified and identify themselves as similar to and different from each other and the relation of these categories of difference to power relations. The study of feminist and queer thought on sex/gender and sexuality offers a critical lens through which to examine social structures and social problems, inequality, difference and diversity, identity and the self, belonging and community, and the possibility of social change, among other topics. This course will offer a broad introduction to the field and provide a foundation for further study of specific areas of interest. The primary goals are to (1) explore the multiple ways feminist and queer scholars have understood sex, gender, and sexuality; (2) explore different methods and styles of feminist thought and expression; (3) situate these in time and place, with attention to historical and cultural contexts; and (4) explore the intersections of sex, gender, and sexuality with race, nation, and other categories of difference. The course will cover aspects of first-wave feminism (e.g., suffrage and the abolitionist movement); second-wave feminism and critical theories of sex/gender; and contemporary feminism, including queer theory, intersectionality and race, and transnational and postcolonial feminism.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Prereq: None

FGSS201 Junior Colloquium: Critical Queer Studies

This junior colloquium will give you a solid theoretical foundation in the field of queer studies. Although "queer" is a contested term, it describes--at least potentially--sexualities and genders that fall outside normative constellations. However, as queer studies has been institutionalized in the academy, in popular culture, and in contemporary political movements, many argue that today, "queer" has lost its political charge. This course, a reading-intensive seminar, will give you the opportunity to explore this history and these debates. We will start with some of the foundational works in queer theory and then move to tensions and unlikely correspondences between queer theory and critical race theory, trans studies, queer anthropology, Marxism, feminist theory, and disability studies. Rather than understanding queer studies as a singular or bounded school of thought, we will continuously problematize queer studies as a field and a mode of analysis, asking, What kinds of bodies or desires does queer describe? What are the politics of queer? What are the promises of queer theory, and what are its perils? What is the future of queer?

This course is excellent preparation for a queer studies concentration in American studies. Students should expect to end the semester confident of their ability to read queer theory, critique it, and imagine the uses to which queer theory might be put.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST201
Prereq: None

FGSS204 Latina Historical Narratives (FGSS Gateway)

In this course, we will engage the historical experiences of Latinas through a range of historical and literary narratives. Using a comparative approach as well as exploring issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality, this course will address a number of themes relevant to the lived experiences of these women, including migration, labor, education, cultural negotiations, and transnational family and economic relations. We will consider questions such as: How does migration impact the cultural and gendered understandings of themselves as Latina women? How do Latinas (re)imagine the histories of Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, and transnational Dominicans in the U.S.? How do Latinas challenge definitions of womanhood in their literary and historical narratives?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Prereq: None

FGSS205 #Sayhername: Intersectionality and Feminist Activism (FGSS Gateway)

The hashtag #sayhername has been used throughout social media in the past few years to bring awareness to the ways in which African American women and other women of color have been both targeted and silenced by racialized and sexualized violence. This course aims to provide a broader historical and cultural context to this movement by "saying the names" of the many women of color who have organized feminist intersectional movements against racism and patriarchy. We will explore the ways African American, Latina, Asian American, and Native American women have challenged patriarchy within and outside of their own communities through both overtly feminist organizations and within movements for racial and class justice such as labor and cultural nationalist movements. Finally, we will look at contemporary expressions of feminist activism by women of color that problematize definitions of feminism.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Prereq: None

FGSS206 Introduction to African American Women's History

This course offers a solid foundation in the history of black women in the United States, from the 17th-century beginnings of North American slavery to the present. Using a broad range of primary and secondary sources, from writings by and about enslaved women to films and documentaries, we will examine the experiences, voices, and contributions of everyday black women as well as famous figures in African American women's history. Major questions of the course will include how black women forged political and social movements that transformed the United States, even as they faced the constraints of slavery, segregation, and gender-based exclusion. Students will practice reading, thinking, speaking, and writing critically about a range of historical sources and questions, with an aim of understanding how race, gender, class, legal status, and sexuality have intersected to shape the lives of African American women throughout U.S. history.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AFAM
Identical With: AFAM206
Prereq: None

FGSS209 Feminist Theories

How does "feminist" (a political commitment) modify "theory" (an intellectual practice)? We will address this question by reading a range of contemporary feminist theorists working to analyze the complex interrelations of social differences (gender, race, class, sexual orientation, religion, and so on), and relations of social domination and economic exploitation in a globalized world. The question, What is to be done? will oversee our work.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Identical With: ENGL208
Prereq: None

FGSS210 Ethics of Embodiment (FGSS Gateway)

Why is the human body such a contested site of ethical concern? Why are bodies thought to be so in need of description and regulation? Sexual practices, gendered presentations, bodily sizes, physical aptitudes, colors of skin, styles of hair--all are both intimately felt and socially inscribed. Bodies exist at the intersection of the most private and the most public and are lived in relation to powerful social norms. In this course, we turn to the critical work of feminist and queer scholars committed to analyzing how bodies matter.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-FGSS
Identical With: ENGL211, AMST281
Prereq: None

FGSS215 Buddhism and the Body: Desire, Disgust, and Transcendence

This is a course about the body and the various ways that Buddhists have constructed, disciplined, despised, and venerated the human body. We will explore the Buddhist body in its various incarnations: the disciplined monastic body of monks and nuns, the hyper-masculine body of the Buddha, the sacred corpses of saints, the body given away in sacrifice, the body as marker of virtue and vice, the sexual body, the body transformed in ritual, and the body as understood in Buddhist medicine. Careful attention to ancient and modern Buddhist writing should enrich our understanding of what it means to inhabit a human body.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: RELI214
Prereq: None

FGSS216 Global America: Gender, Empire & Internationalism Since 1890

This course explores the cultural history of America's relationship to the world across the long 20th century with particular attention to the significance of gender and sexuality. We will locate U.S. culture and politics within an international dynamic, exposing the interrelatedness of domestic and foreign affairs. While exploring specific geopolitical events like the Spanish-American War, World War I and II, and the Global Cold War, this course emphasizes the political importance of culture and ideology rather than offering a formal overview of U.S. foreign policy. How have Americans across the 20th century drawn from ideas about gender to understand their country's relationship to the wider world? In what ways have gendered ideologies and gendered approaches to politics shaped America's performance on the world's stage? How have geopolitical events impacted the construction of race and gender on the home front? In the most general sense, this course is designed to encourage students to understand American cultural and gender history as the product of America's engagement with the world. In so doing, we will explore the rise of U.S. global power as an enterprise deeply related to conceptions of race, sexuality, and gender. While reading key American studies texts in the history of the United States and the World, we will also examine films, political speeches, visual culture, music, and popular culture.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Identical With: AMST211
Prereq: None

FGSS217 Key Issues in Black Feminism (FGSS Gateway)

This course surveys key issues in the historical development of black feminist thoughts and practices through readings of canonical works especially from the 1980s and '90s that contribute to this extensive body of knowledge. Our aim is to engage black feminist and womanist theorists, activists and artists from the diaspora who are exploring intersections of race, class, sexuality, religion, and other indices of identity affecting their daily lives. To that end, we will take an interdisciplinary approach to unpacking the historical tensions and politics and poetics in theory/practice, representation/self-making and expression/performance. We will also examine more recent turns in #BlackLivesMatter, #SayHerName and #BlackGirlMagic and conclude with Post-Zora Interventions-- feminist interrogations on the borders anthropology, art, and activism.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AFAM
Identical With: ANTH201
Prereq: None

FGSS218 Introduction to Queer Studies

This course will examine major ideas in the field of queer studies. Relying upon theoretical, historical, and cultural studies texts, we will consider the representation and constructions of sexuality-based identities as they have been formed within the contemporary United States. We will explore the idea of sexuality as a category of social identity, probing the identities of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender to try to understand what they really mean in various cultural, social, legal, and political milieus. In doing so, we will ask, What does it mean to study queerness? What do we mean by "queer studies"? How do institutions--religious, legal, and scientific--shape our understandings of queer identities? In what ways do sexuality and gender interact, and how does this interaction inform the meanings of each of these identity categories? How do other social categories of identification--race, ethnicity, and class--affect the ways in which we understand expressions of queerness? Moreover, what does studying queerness tell us about the workings of contemporary political, cultural, and social life?
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST218
Prereq: None

FGSS221 Slavery and the Literary Imagination

Enslavement in America and the New World was inextricably linked to the written word. What, then, does it mean to write the story of enslavement, loss, forced migration, liberation, and restoration? How does one tell the story of enslavement when that effort depends on articulating the unspeakable?

The works and writers examined in this course will prompt students to consider how one revisits history and what is required to imagine, write, and rewrite the stories and histories of people, places, and nations. We will discuss the ways in which specific literary forms enable, contain, and transform unwieldy, complicated, and stunning stories of enslavement, liberation, self-determination, activism, racialization, and nationhood.

Our readings will include an array of well-known, understudied, and newly recovered primary works and materials by and about individuals such as William Wells Brown, Charles Chesnutt, Frederick Douglass, Briton Hammon, Jupiter Hammon, James Mars, Pauline Hopkins, Mattie Jackson, Mary Prince, Chloe Spear, and Phillis Wheatley. Additional primary materials will include writings published in 18th- and 19th-century newspapers such as the "Boston Weekly Newsletter," "The Connecticut Journal," "The Liberator," and "North Star."
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-AFAM
Identical With: AFAM222, ENGL222
Prereq: None

FGSS223 Sex, Money, and Power: Anthropology of Intimacy and Exchange

Sex and money--intimacy and economy--are often imagined to occupy distinct and separate spheres. Sex and intimacy are located in the private or domestic realm, in spaces of leisure, feelings, care, and personal connections. Money and economy, on the other hand, are purportedly public, located in the market and tied to labor, rationality, and impersonal (non)-relations. This course brings these spheres together, focusing on the links, exchanges, and circuits between the intimate and the economic in diverse cultural contexts across the Americas. Case studies will be drawn from sex work and tourism; marketing and pornography; reproduction, domestic labor, transnational adoption; marriage; class and sexual lifestyle; labor and carework; the global market in organs and body parts; outsourced surrogacy; sex stores and commodities; and sexual activism and identity politics. We will be centrally concerned with the relationship between economic, cultural, and political formations and with the differences race, ethnicity, nation, class, gender, and sexuality make. Throughout, we will ask, How do practices and bodies accrue value? When are intimacies--sexual and social--commoditized? How have transnational flows complicated relationships between sex and money? How do these intersections constrain and/or empower people? And, finally, who benefits from such arrangements, and who does not?
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: ANTH203, AMST228
Prereq: None

FGSS224 Mystics and Militants: Medieval Women Writers

In this class we will read a wide range of works written by European women between ca. 1100--1400, including courtly, devotional, and polemical texts. The course will explore ideologies of gender in the Middle Ages and examine the ways in which our authors confronted the misogynist discourses of their eras with learning and imagination. We will consider such topics as constructions of sexuality and the body, "courtly love," mystical religious experience, heresies, humanism, and utopian realms. In short, we will read works by women who created their own forms of authority and in doing so, both influenced and defied the authorities of their time.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL232, MDST238
Prereq: None

FGSS225 Place, Belonging, and Sound in the 20th c. Latina/o/x, Black, & Caribbean Imaginations--NYC

Throughout the latter 20th century, various aesthetic renderings of New York City have positioned it as a site of voyeuristic allure and racialized excess and pleasure--simultaneously posh, unfriendly, tourist-trapped, "seedy," "gritty," and segregated. Through select literary, cinematic, and performance optics of Latina/o/x, black, and Caribbean writers and artists, especially queer and bisexual writers and artists, this course will focus on memory, representation, form, sound, and the imagination in the layered and shifting site of mid-20th- to 21st-century New York City--and even more specifically, of Harlem, the Bronx, the Lower East Side, Brooklyn, and Elizabeth, N.J. Fictionalizations, poetizations, and performances of first-person memories and reimaginings of overheard stories from older generations about life in the U.S. South and life in the Caribbean will feature in the works that we will study in this course.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL215, AMST238
Prereq: None

FGSS227 Queen Mothers, Unruly Women: Histories of Gender and Sexuality in Africa

The 1929 Women's War is a touchstone for women's history in Africa. By 'sitting on a man' women in Nigeria shocked colonial authorities and demanded economic rights and a public voice. These unruly women danced in protest and rioted (sometimes nude), but their actions were not uncommon sights for their African audience. African women across the continent had long wielded power as queen mothers, prophets, and traders. Others challenged the constraints of ordinary domestic life through their labor, dress, or spirit possession.

Gender and contested authority are central to everyday life and politics in Africa. In this course, we will study the history of political and domestic authority on the continent with special consideration for the ways in which gender, sexuality, and power intersect. These histories are diverse both in time and place. For this reason, this course will not present a single narrative of gender in African history. However, students who satisfactorily complete the course will be able to write knowledgeably about the major debates surrounding gender and sexuality in Africa. Major themes include: spiritual authority; domestic and sexual life; the division of labor; and the impact of colonial rule and post-colonial politics. We will examine how women (and also men) have grappled with these intricate social and political relations from the pre-colonial period into the post-colonial era.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST226
Prereq: None

FGSS233 Global Queer Studies

This course explores global experiences of LGBT/Q life, bringing an explicitly transnational lens to a field too often dominated by U.S.-centered perspectives.

Drawing on queer ethnography and film, we will explore the contours of queer and trans life around the globe, from the lives of gay men in Indonesia to Muslim yan daudu in Nigeria, gay tourism in post-Revolutionary Cuba, queer mati work among working-class Afro-Surinamese women, lesbian activism in India, LGBT asylum claims in Canada, the queer art of Carnival in Trinidad and Tobago, the everyday lives of lalas (lesbians) in China, and and the transnational lives of Filipino gay men in New York. Our aim is to expand Western categories and concepts of sexuality, gender, identity, and desire (both hetero- and homo-normative), and to understand how sexual/gendered identities, cultures, and politics are shaped by colonialism, imperialism, racialization, migration, transnational media, and global capitalism.

This semester will feature a lecture/film series as part of our course, with visiting scholars Erin Durban-Albright (on postcolonial homophobia in Haiti), Martin Manalansan (on QTPOC Filipino lives), and filmmaker Harjant Gill (on gender/sexuality in India).
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST233, ANTH233
Prereq: None

FGSS234 Queer Russia

Russia is accustomed to playing the role of the "evil empire." The current ongoing war in Ukraine has resurrected the Cold War-era narratives about Russia as a dark, aggressive, and ruthless military power. The notorious legislation of recent years--whose functions range from barring Americans from adopting Russian orphans to criminalizing the so-called "gay propaganda"--have further solidified Russia's reputation as a country with little regard for human rights. Yet generations of Russian poets, artists, and writers have transformed the country's systematic oppression and violence into spectacular forms of protest and self-expression. This course focuses on gender and sexuality in exploring an alternative cultural history of Russia, which highlights its queer legacy from the nineteenth century to the present. We will examine poetry, fiction, art, memoirs, plays, films, performances, and discursive texts that showcase uniquely Russian conceptions of marriage, gender relations, gender expression, and sexual identity. Attention will be paid to the ways in which Russian and Western narratives of queerness align and diverge. In English. No knowledge of Russian is required or expected.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-REES
Identical With: REES235, RULE235, RUSS235
Prereq: None

FGSS235 Economies of Death, Geographies of Care

Living, dying, and care work are processes often governed by economic logics that render some lives killable and others grievable in global regimes of power. This course explores how theoretical frameworks of "economies of death" and "geographies of care" can help to illuminate how human and nonhuman lives, deaths, and systems of care are intertwined with economic logics. Whose lives are privileged over others and with what consequences? How are certain bodies made killable and others grievable? How do we understand and face care processes of death and dying, and how are these processes often geographically determined? How do we live and die well, give and receive care, and who has this privilege? This class interrogates these and other questions related to how we live and die with others in a multispecies world. With attention to race, gender, species, and other sites of perceived difference, students will gain a nuanced understanding of core themes related to fundamental processes of living, dying, and caring labor. This course asks students to theorize economies of death and geographies of care to understand the deeply political nature of life and death as differential moments on a continuum of being. We focus on key questions related to an affirmative politics of life--in other words, how we should live, how we care and for whom, and how we might foster nonviolent interpersonal life-affirming encounters. Students can expect to explore pressing contemporary issues such as mass incarceration and "social death"; climate change; valuing and commodifying life; breeding and raising nonhuman animals for food; plant consciousness; end-of-life care and euthanasia; and the role of marginalized bodies in biomedical research. The course will be primarily discussion-based.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Identical With: SISP235
Prereq: None

FGSS236 Activism and Theories of Change

In this course we will explore strategies and theories of change that shape social justice movements, with particular reference to recent movements in the United States. We will discuss the benefits and risks of the many available strategies including direct action, grassroots mobilization, impact litigation, legislative campaigns, electoral campaigns, artistic protest, and public education. When do they strengthen one another, and when do they collide? What ethical or moral questions are raised by various types of protest and communications? The instructor will draw on her own experiences as an activist for women's rights, queer rights, and economic justice. We will also consider the strategies of other recent movements such as Occupy, Black Lives Matter and gun safety activism, and we will allow time to discuss events that may occur in real time over the course of the semester. This course will be relevant to students interested in public policy, feminism, gender and sexuality studies, and other social sciences, and will provide useful insight for future organizers and activists, lawyers, and public policy makers.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: CSPL235, AFAM235
Prereq: None

FGSS237 Histories of Modern U.S. Gender and Sexuality

This course will explore constructions of U.S. gender and sexuality from the late 19th century to the present. We will consider ideologies of gender and sexuality as social, political, economic, and biomedical systems, as well as lived, material realities. Particular attention will be paid to intersectional politics, by interrogating how categories such as race, class, disability, and national identity operate in relation to gender and sexual politics. Topics covered will include: the scientific "invention" of hetero- and homosexuality; anti-miscegenation law; gender-based immigration regulations; ideas of normative domesticity and kinship; labor patterns and gender-based disparities; gender- and sexuality-based rights' movements, including first, second, and third wave feminisms and LGBTQIA liberation; and reproductive technologies and rights.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST237
Prereq: None

FGSS238 Witnessing Animal Others: Mourning, Haunting, and the Politics of Animal (After) Lives

Witnessing, mourning, and haunting are frameworks that make political the lives and deaths of human and nonhuman others. Bringing these frameworks into conversation, this course will explore the following questions: What does witnessing and grieving animal lives and deaths show us about economic logics, racialization, and species hierarchies that form the foundation of contemporary social relations? How does the emotional become political in these contexts? What are the limits and possibilities of witnessing and mourning as political acts? How is witnessing distinct from spectatorship or voyeurism? What power dynamics exist in witnessing? What do different rituals or practices of mourning say about the mourner and the subject being mourned? What further action does witnessing or mourning provoke or demand? How do conceptualizations of haunting help to theorize and inform political practices of witnessing and mourning? Central to these questions is a consideration of the way histories track forward and haunt the present--how racialized, gendered, and anthropocentric histories shape contemporary social and economic relations. The course will use these theoretical frames to explore a series of empirical examples, such as: What does it mean to witness and mourn the settler-colonial histories that haunt the present in daily practices of ranching and farming animals for food? How are settler-colonial histories implicated in the phenomenon of animals killed on roads (innocuously termed roadkill) through the development of the U.S. railroad and interstate highway system and through land use change and habitat destruction? What does witnessing the captive animal in the zoo tell us about the imperialist histories of the zoo where humans and animals have been exhibited? What does witnessing or mourning do for the ghostly specters of "spent" dairy cows (lively-yet-soon-to-be-dead commodities) moving through the farmed animal auction yard and for their commodity afterlives born through slaughter and rendering? How does art act as a form of witnessing, for instance, through photographers such as Chris Jordan documenting the afterlives of plastic in the bellies of albatrosses on Midway Island? Throughout the semester, we will use art, fiction, poetry, and memoir to explore these concepts of witnessing, mourning, and haunting in the context of animal lives and deaths. The course will be heavily discussion-based.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Identical With: SISP238
Prereq: None

FGSS239 Animal Theories/Human Fictions

The question of "the animal" has become a recent focus of theory, although depictions of nonhuman animals can be traced to the very origins of representation. This course will move among literature, philosophy, art, and theory in an effort to trace the changing conceptions of human-animal difference and human-animal relations from 18th-century fictions of savage men and wild children to current theories of the posthuman. We will consider the ways that the representation of "the animal" intersects with theories of gender and race as it also contests the grounds of representation itself. Authors may include Rousseau, Poe, Sewell, Mann, Colette, Coetzee, Heidegger, Agamben, Derrida, and Harway.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-COL
Identical With: COL238, ENGL252
Prereq: None

FGSS240 The Gendering of Music in Cross-Cultural Perspective

This course presents a critical examination of issues explored and debated in recent studies of gender, power, identity, and music from diversified music traditions, including Western art music, popular music, and world music. Drawing upon interdisciplinary discourse on theories of feminism and gender, as well as the new gay and lesbian musicology, through case studies and analysis of various musical examples, we will investigate the following topics: women's multiple roles in the historical and contemporary practices of music; desire, sexuality, and women's images in music; and how gender ideology, contextualized by sociocultural conditions, both constructs and is constructed by musical aesthetics, performance practice, creative processes, and the reception of music.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-MUSC
Identical With: MUSC291
Prereq: None

FGSS243 Television: The Domestic Medium

Of all the mass media, television is the most intimately associated with domestic and familial life. Its installation in American homes over the postwar decade coincided with a revival of family life that encouraged an emphasis on private over public leisure. Most television is still watched at home, where viewing practices are interwoven with domestic routines and provide a site for negotiating family and gender relations. Television production is shaped at several levels by the images broadcasters and advertisers have of viewers' domestic lives: Broadcast schedules reflect socially conditioned assumptions about the gendered division of family roles; a common televisual mode of address uses a conversational style in which performers present themselves to viewers as friends or members of the family; and families or surrogate families figure prominently in the content of programming across a wide range of genres, including sitcoms, primetime dramas, daytime soaps, and talk shows. Sitcoms, in particular, have responded to and mediated historical shifts in family forms and gender relations over the past 50 years, and they will be a focus in this course. We will explore how television has both shaped and responded to larger cultural discourses about family and gender from the postwar era into the 21st century.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: ANTH244, AMST253, FILM349
Prereq: None

FGSS244 Feminist and Queer Theories of Social Reproduction

This course will introduce students to the study of social reproduction and power with an emphasis on feminist, queer, and transnational approaches to inquiry and action. We will begin by exploring key methodologies and theoretical framings for understanding contemporary "American" cultural, social, and political formations both within and beyond the territorial U.S., focusing on the effectiveness of discursive and historical modes of critical analysis. The subsequent sections of the course will turn to three case studies of the historical routes and transnational implications of U.S.-based political discourses around (1) population control and reproductive justice, (2) abolition and the prison-industrial complex, and (3) debt and higher education. By engaging with each area of inquiry through theoretical, historical, and grounded activist texts, we will think through the possibilities for utilizing academic work in concert with movement-based engaged scholarship to address the uneven distribution of life chances and the potential of imagining the world otherwise.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Identical With: SOC244
Prereq: SOC151

FGSS246 Women Behaving Badly -Policing Race, Gender, and Deviance in History

This course focuses on "women behaving badly" in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in America. Students will explore the histories of female murderers and criminals as well as examine the experiences of women who transgressed racial, gendered, and sexual mores. Ultimately, we will investigate the tension between accepted social norms and the struggle for female autonomy.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AFAM
Identical With: AFAM244
Prereq: None

FGSS247 Major Themes in Black Feminism

This course will explore critical issues and debates in black feminism from early feminist works to more contemporary writers and theorists. Fundamentally, the course will help students critically analyze feminist texts, paying attention to the ways that black feminism challenges and reflects mainstream social and political hierarchies. This course will also draw upon a range of texts including art, literature, poetry, film and music.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AFAM
Identical With: AFAM245
Prereq: None

FGSS255 Sex Work and Sex Trafficking: Empowerment, Exploitation, and the Politics of Sex

This course explores the history, politics, and social meaning of sex work. Focusing particularly but not exclusively upon prostitution, we will pay careful attention to the diverse range of social experiences that form sex work, as well as the way in which prostitution is used as a governing metaphor within sexual relations more generally. Some questions the course will consider: How has sex work changed over time, and what do these changes tell us about both the nature of sex work and about the broader society? In what ways is sex work similar to or different from other forms of service labor or other types of intimate relationship? How do questions of race, class, sexuality, and gender alter the meaning and experience of sex work? What sorts of desires and expectations do clients bring to interactions with sex workers, and in what ways have these shifted over time? Recent controversies concerning sex trafficking and underage prostitution will also be addressed, as will the effects of various regulatory schemes that have been developed around the world.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Identical With: SOC256
Prereq: SOC151

FGSS256 Social Movements

How, when, and why do social movements emerge? What motivates individuals to participate? What transforms problems into grievances and grievances to action? How should movements be organized, and what tactics should they use? What factors explain movement success and failure (and how should success and failure be defined)? What is a social movement, anyway? This course seeks to introduce some of the major ways scholars have approached such questions and, at the same time, to give a sense of both the high drama and the everyday details of social movement activism, using historical and sociological case studies. Course readings concentrate on U.S. movements, including racial justice, class, gender, and sexuality-based activism.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Identical With: SOC246, AMST246
Prereq: SOC151

FGSS264 Black Feminisms in the Americas: Politics, Representation, and Queer Ruminations of Elsewhere

This course will explore Black feminist intellectual productions, highlighting the many theoretical, political, and critically imaginative elements found throughout early and contemporary works. Our discussions will reflect on power, the production of knowledge, identity, inequality, and the politics and perils of Black feminist struggle. Relying on a variety of texts and media--such as writings, visual & performance arts, poetry, music, and film--students should expect to engage with key issues and debates, along with the epistemological challenges offered by queer of color critique, trans/national perspectives, and social alternatives emerging from across the Black (feminist) diaspora.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AFAM
Identical With: AFAM246
Prereq: None

FGSS265 American Labor History from 1776 to Recent Times

"By the sweat of thy brow shalt thou eat bread," the Lord enjoined in Genesis.

But who did the hard work in the United States? How did they live? How were they organized? To what ends? Why has their power declined in recent times? These questions are explored in this course, which will reach back to the 18th century but highlight the 20th century.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST266, AMST265
Prereq: None

FGSS266 Future Visions: Temporality and the Politics of Change

What is the time of political change? This course explores alternative temporal frameworks embraced by artists, writers, activists, and interdisciplinary scholars from diverse social and cultural locations. We ask, How do concepts of temporality help us understand, resist, contest, and transform prevailing social orders?

We will begin by assembling some conceptual tools for understanding the relationship of time to historical change and to racial, sexual, cultural, and national difference. Drawing on psychoanalysis, literary theory, history, trauma studies, anthropology, African American studies, queer theory, feminist studies, and postcolonial studies, we will explore the telos of modernity and narratives of liberal progress. We will then consider some of the critical and oppositional possibilities of being out of sync with dominant temporal frameworks, asking, Are there other, perhaps more livable, temporalities? Next, we will consider the possibilities for memory and memorialization to work against historical forgetting and cultural amnesia--alongside the ways historical pasts might be appropriated to serve nationalist ends. Finally, we will turn to the question of the future as found in meditations on utopias and dystopias; in political, cultural, and ecological justice movements; in ideologies of newness; and in rhetorics of apocalypse.

Our readings include three texts that highlight the form and futures of political change: Theresa Hak Kyung Cha's Dictee, an avant-garde text that uses multiple genres (poetry, autobiography, history, photography, etc.) juxtaposing historical trauma and aesthetic experimentation; Kim Fortun's Advocacy After Bhopal: Environmentalism, Disaster, New Global Orders, an experimental ethnography of environmental disaster and its aftermath; and Octavia E. Butler's Kindred, a speculative fiction about time travel and the memory of slavery. As we consider social change, revolutions, and new "ends" and beginnings, students are invited to explore current social justice movements.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST266, ANTH205
Prereq: None

FGSS267 Revolution Girl-Style Now: Queer and Feminist Performance Strategies

Looking to the rich cultural history of queer and feminist performance in the U.S, this course examines performances of gender, sexuality, obscenity, and refusal. In this class, we will ask how the terms "feminist" and "queer" come to determine a specific piece of theater or performance art. Is it the author's own political affiliation that establishes the work as feminist? Is it the audience's reading that gathers a work of art under a queer rubric? Furthermore, where does feminist performance meet queer performance? Topics will include feminist body art, AIDS activism, queer nightlife, installation and performance art, video art, and memoir. Focusing in on strategies for engaging the many meanings of the words "queer" and "feminist," we will pair theoretical readings with theatrical sites. Authors and artists to be discussed will include Judith Butler, Paula Vogel, Holly Hughes, Beth Henley, Karen Finley, Samuel Delany, Nao Bustamante, Rebecca Schneider, Anna Deavere Smith, José Muñoz, Jill Dolan, Sylvia Rivera, Sharon Hayes, Sharon P. Holland, Bikini Kill, boychild, Lucy Lippard, Laurie Weeks, and Dean Spade.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-THEA
Identical With: THEA267, AMST276
Prereq: None

FGSS276 Black Performance Theory

What does it mean to perform identity, to perform race, to perform blackness? How is blackness defined as both a radical aesthetic and an identity? In this course, we will focus on theater and performance as a resource for thinking about black history, identity, and radical politics in excess of the written word. Following recent work in Black Studies and Performance Studies, this class will pay particular attention to the doing of blackness, the visible, sonic, and haptic performances that give over to a radical way of seeing, feeling, and being in an anti-black world. Plays, films, and texts might include works by Fred Moten, Alexander Weheilye, Brandon Jacobs-Jenkins, Suzan Lori-Parks, Danai Gurira, Shane Vogel, Adrienne Kennedy, Sarah Jane Cervenak, Dee Rees, Celiné Sciamma, Saidiya Hartman, Huey P. Copeland, Darby English, Lorraine Hansberry, Hilton Als, Spike Lee, Isaac Julien, Martine Syms, Tavia Nyong'o, and Daphne Brooks.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-THEA
Identical With: THEA266, AFAM266, ENGL263
Prereq: None

FGSS277 Feminist Philosophy and Moral Theory (FGSS Gateway)

This course explores the dialogue between feminist concerns and moral theory. It will explore not only how moral theory might support certain central feminist insights and aims but also why some feminists cast doubt on the project of "doing moral theory." Does the language of existing philosophical moral theories (reason, fairness, equality, utility, human nature, rights) sufficiently allow articulation of feminist problems? If not, how can feminist moral theorists move us beyond the grip of familiar gender-loaded oppositions? After surveying a range of perspectives on feminism and philosophy, we will give a deep reading to three book-length developments of feminist ethics: one from a Kantian perspective, one focused on care, and one focused on virtue ethics. As a gateway course for the FGSS program, this course serves to introduce critical thinking about the construction of gender and the intersection of gender with race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-PHIL
Identical With: PHIL277
Prereq: None

FGSS281 Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greek Culture

In this course we will examine the construction of gender roles in ancient Greece and approach gender as an organizing principle of private and public life in ancient Greek society. Using literary, scientific, historical, and philosophical sources as well as material evidence, we will address issues including the creation of woman, conceptions of the male and female body, the legal status of men and women; what constitutes acceptable sexual practices and for whom (e.g., heterosexual relationships, homoeroticism, prostitution, adultery); and ideas regarding desire, masculinity and femininity, and their cultivation in social, political, and ritual contexts such as rituals of initiation, marriage, drinking parties, the law court, and the theater. How ancient approaches to gender and sexuality are in dialogue or have informed recent debates will be a question throughout the course. We will end by looking at how ideas about sexuality in classical antiquity were used in ROMER V. EVANS, otherwise known as the 1993 Colorado Gay Rights Case.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS, SBS-CLAS
Identical With: CCIV281
Prereq: None

FGSS286 Queer Activism and Radical Scholarship: Beyond Theory vs. Practice

This course explores the relationship between scholarship and activism, with a focus on intersectional radical queer scholarship and activism--queer left, black radical, trans, immigration, prison abolition, and sex work--in the United States. We will aim to connect the too-often bifurcated realms of academia and activism, theory and practice, research and action, so that we might think through the political stakes of knowledge-making in and outside the so-called "ivory tower," explore interdisciplinary methodologies we might use to study and learn from (and with) activists (including ethnography, oral history, and community archive), and gain insight into the histories and current realities of social justice movements, campus activisms, the work of a radical imagination, art and activism, and the impasse of the political present. To put their theory into practice, students will undertake a semester-long radical research project on a queer issue or activist organization--past or present--of their choice.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST286, ANTH286
Prereq: None

FGSS288 Gender and Sexuality in Chinese Narrative

This course pays particular attention to gender relations and representations of sexuality in Chinese narrative. This course will require close readings of translated Chinese novels, short stories and movies. We will explore themes and motifs such as gender roles in Confucianism, female chastity, same sex desire, cross-dressing, masculinity and femininity, manhood and misogyny, eroticism, the cult of qing (passion), the New Woman, socialist and post-socialist desires, and writing bodies in the era of globalization. In addition to providing a platform for appreciation of the aesthetic beauty of Chinese narrative, the course encourages students to think about how representations of gender and sexuality incorporate or confront the mainstream moral values and social principles in China.

All readings are in English, no prior knowledge of Chinese language or culture is required. No text book requirement.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Identical With: CEAS278
Prereq: None

FGSS293 Pleasure and Power: The Sociology of Sexuality

This course seeks to denaturalize some of what are often the most taken-for-granted aspects of daily life: our bodies and genders, our erotic desires, and our sexual identities. To this end, this course will provide a critical-historical overview of dominant Euro-American understandings of sexuality and their embodied legacies.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Identical With: SOC293
Prereq: SOC151

FGSS295 Queer Opera

Opera is a total art: It weds elaborate fashions with scene design and lighting to create incredible dramas set to music. For this reason, opera forces us to think interdisciplinarily about the narratives it portrays. Every action, every emotion, every decision and recognition in the drama is conveyed to the audience in multiple and sometimes contradictory ways. Operas are also fantastic living experiments in the performative representation of human sexuality. In addition to all of the love and sex that occurs explicitly on the opera stage--and there is plenty of that--operatic narratives also bear witness to changing structures of normativity; regimes of social control are thematized, sometimes lampooned, and often transgressed within the drama, and operas allow us to see how this unfolds within an interconnected ensemble of media. This course serves to introduce students to the world of the opera stage and, through that world, the foundational texts of queer theory. Together we will explore operas from the 17th century to the present day, opera theory of the past century, and queer theory of the past three decades to ask what these bodies of knowledge have to teach each other.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-MUSC
Identical With: MUSC294
Prereq: None

FGSS301 Black Speculative Fictions and the Anthropocene

The genre of black speculative fiction--in the form of literature, art, music, and theory--provides a generative framework through which to (re)think understandings of race, gender, sexuality, class, the body, disability, citizenship, and the human. Often couched as taking place in the "future," black speculative fictions also engage the past and critique the present. This makes the genre a critical resource for addressing the Anthropocene. The term "Anthropocene" first emerged from the discipline of geology in 2000. Scientists proposed that Earth had entered a new epoch (following the Holocene) in which "humans" had become geological forces, impacting the planet itself. However, the term Anthropocene raises numerous questions. What does it mean to think about the human at the level of a "species"? What constitutes evidence of the Anthropocene and when did it begin? Who is responsible for the Anthropocene's attendant catastrophes, which include earthquakes, altered ocean waters, and massive storms? Does the Anthropocene overemphasize the human and thus downplay other interspecies and human-nonhuman, animate-inanimate relations? Or does it demand a (potentially fruitful) reconceptualization of the human? Further, how does artificial intelligence complicate definitions of the human and, by extension, of the Anthropocene? Centering the work of black speculative thinkers and placing it in conversation with scientific studies ranging from marine biology and geology to cybernetics, this course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the Anthropocene that endeavors to (re)conceptualize the human, ecological relations, and Earth itself. Texts engaged will include: novels, art, music, theory, and scientific studies.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM302, AFAM312, E&ES125
Prereq: None

FGSS302 Critical Perspectives on the State

This course builds on Marxist, poststrucuturalist, feminist, anarchist, and cultural analyses to take a critical approach to the state--what it is and what it does. We will examine how the state is imagined by those who write about it and struggle against it. Where does the state begin? How do states act, and what are the consequences of these acts? How is rule consolidated and how are individuals and communities annexed to the project of rule? How do people engage with state acts and ideologies? We will read texts drawn from a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, feminist theory, political theory, philosophy, sociology, and geography, that examine the nature, everyday workings, and effects of state power. Drawing upon ethnographic examples from around the world, we will analyze how states are cultural artifacts that produce and regulate people's identities and bodies, reproduce social inequalities, and engender resistances of all sorts. Some of the topics we will discuss include bureaucracy, governmentality, the security state, the prison industrial complex, terror and militarism, law and justice, citizenship, democracy, refugees, anti-state movements, the "man" in the state, and welfare and post-welfare politics.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Identical With: ANTH302
Prereq: None

FGSS303 Reproductive Politics and the Family in Africa

This course will introduce students to broad discourses and issues related to reproduction and the family in modern Africa. We will study maternal health and technologies of reproduction, but for us reproduction will be an object of historical inquiry. One of the driving questions for this course will be how reproduction has been given meaning socially. How have African societies understood abortion, infanticide, or other medical means of controlling fertility and childbirth? What has been the relationship between the family and the state? We will also examine ideas about sexuality and love, changing notions of parenthood, and what constitutes an ideal family. Finally, we will interrogate how these ideas influenced political practices and ideologies and, in turn, changed conceptions of motherhood, fatherhood, and the family.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST302
Prereq: None

FGSS304 Pantheologies: Animal, Vegetable, Mineral, World

Pantheism teaches that the world itself is divine. The idea seems simple enough, yet it has suffered extraordinary ridicule at the hands of western philosophers and theologians, who have considered "matter" to be lifeless, dark, and feminine (which is to say, as different as possible from "God.") This course will explore this generalized panic over pantheism--in particular, the anxieties it encodes over gender, race, nationality, and class, and the contribution such anxieties have made to an unequally distributed attack on the "environment."

Seeking an alternative to our raced and gendered ecocidal metaphysic, the course then turns to contemporary pantheologies. To what extent are recent theories of cosmology, complexity, and materiality setting forth subtle pantheisms? What are the feminist, anti-racist, and ecological stakes of these theories? Properly conceived, what is pantheism; is it ultimately distinguishable from atheism; and what use are any of these platforms in developing an ethic and politic of environmental justice?
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: RELI305, SISP305
Prereq: None

FGSS305 Techniques of the Liar: Performance, Artifice, Fraud

This seminar is a cultural and intellectual history of fraudulence, fiction, and faking it. We will explore both specific performance practices as well as theorizations of artifice, fraud, and authenticity. Topics will include illusion, ventriloquism, and sleight of hand; mimetic acting and the manufacture of "emotion"; dance technique and the concealment of effort; and musical improvisation and the politics of invention. We will also consider the complexities of drag, camp, and minstrelsy and historicize their surrounding discourses, centering the contributions of feminist, queer, and critical race studies. Looking at a range of (predominantly U.S.-based) practices from the mid-19th century to the present, we will consider how artifice and theatricality have been historically reviled as qualities inherent to femininity and queerness, respectively; how "authenticity" is both gendered and racialized; and how hiding, fabulation, exaggeration, and duplicity have also offered means of freedom or resistance.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM306, THEA306
Prereq: None

FGSS307 Mobilizing Dance: Cinema, the Body, and Culture in South Asia

This course focuses on questions of "mobility"--cultural, social, and political--as embodied in two major cultural forms of South Asia, namely "classical" dance and cinema. Using Tamil cinema and Bharatanatyam dance as case studies, the course focuses on issues of colonialism and history, class, sexuality and morality, and globalization. The course places the notion of "flows of culture" at its center and examines historical, social, and aesthetic shifts in these art forms over the past 150 years.

The course is both studio- and lecture-based. It includes learning rudimentary Bharatanatyam technique, watching and analyzing film dance sequences, and participating in guest master classes in ancillary forms such as Bollywood dance and Kathak (North Indian classical dance). The studio portion of this course is for beginners, and no previous dance experience is necessary.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-DANC
Identical With: DANC307, ANTH306
Prereq: None

FGSS308 Brown, Black, and Queer Forms and Feelings

Given how brutally not neutral the world is to black, brown, and queer forms of life and pleasure, this course thinks with "otherwise" spaces, figures, and feelings, like the queer club, the dance floor, abnormality, errancy, illegality, fugitivity, rage, indifference, and love. We will take up José E. Muñoz's invocation of a "minoritarian theory of affect" that insists that "whiteness is a cultural logic which can be understood as an affective code that positions itself as the law." We will study affect beyond whiteness through attention to sonic forms and "audio-visual shapes" in African diasporic, Latina/o/x, and Caribbean arts. We will consider the diasporas and collectives grouped together in the terms "minoritarian," "brown," and "black" as abnormals that generate alternative modes of moving through and feeling ourselves in the world. We will study for radical potentiality in the beautiful, obscene, and off-kilter affects of brown, black, and queer aesthetic and poetic forms.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL328, AMST327, AFAM328
Prereq: None

FGSS309 Christianity and Sexuality

This course will explore a range of Christian teachings on attitudes toward, and technologies of, sex and sexuality. We will read medieval and modern theologies of sexuality, as well as contemporary historical, sociological, and cultural studies. Points of focus will include confession, mysticism, marriage, celibacy, queer and trans* practices and identities, and reproductive justice.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RELI
Identical With: RELI379
Prereq: None

FGSS310 The Senses and the Subject in Cinema and Poetry

In this course, we will study a mixture of emotionally stimulating and structurally difficult cinema and lyric poetry to intensify our capacity to articulate a notion of the senses. Do the senses presume the subject? How do poetry and cinema imagine, racialize, gender, and play with the relation of the senses to the subject? While these two art forms might seem like strange neighbors, this course specifically imagines cinema and lyric poetry as "repositor[ies] of synesthesia" wherein feelings move fugitively, where one sense dubs into and disturbs the imagined discrete domain of the other in measured intervals of time that are generative of sounds, images, and of that which overflows the visual.

The films and poetry selected may carry students into cuts of the Caribbean, the black Atlantic, France, Sweden, Mexico, the U.S., Senegal, Mali, and Spain at distinctly urgent moments in the mid-20th to early 21st century. The threads that will sew the course's images together and bind them to the human subject and senses are the celestial and terrestrial, creation, decomposition, displacement, migration, fascism, colonialism, globalization, and love.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL320, AMST304
Prereq: None

FGSS311 Abolitionist University Studies

This course explores historical materialist theorizations of the practices and future possibilities of the U.S. university as a tool of social reproduction and space of potentially revolutionary thought. In so doing, the readings, assignments, and discussion will be inspired by Stefano Harney and Fred Moten's provocation to reinterpret abolitionism as "not so much the abolition of prisons but the abolition of a society that could have prisons, that could have slavery, that could have the wage, and therefore not abolition as the elimination of anything but abolition as the founding of a new society." Students will consider how conventional renderings of the university in higher education studies, critical university studies, and the popular cultural imaginary are predicated upon an often romanticized and fundamentally limited geographic and historical understanding of the work of colleges and universities. In response, the course cultivates a more capacious conceptualization of the historical and contemporary function of the university as a social form. In taking up abolitionism as both a method and critical analytic, the course will challenge students to imagine the revolutionary possibilities of an abolition university that aligns itself with movements beyond the institution, while reflecting on the particular importance and challenge of enacting such a vision in our current political moment.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM311, AMST270, SOC311
Prereq: None

FGSS313 Funny, You Don't Look Jewish: Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Judaism

This course will give advanced students the opportunity to engage deeply with critical current issues in Judaism, including race, gender, and sexuality. In both the U.S. and Israel, issues of Jewish whiteness (or not), straightness (or not), and maleness (or not) dominate conversations about the direction Judaism will take in the 21st century and how Judaism can remain relevant in an increasingly globalized and secularized world.

Students in this course will read contemporary scholarship on those who have been traditionally pushed to the margins of Judaism and will be asked to wade into murky ethical waters as they think about the power of naming and who has the authority to determine "in" and "out."
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: RELI308, CJST308
Prereq: None

FGSS314 All the Feels: Affect Theory and Cultural Studies

Butterflies in your chest. Perspiration on your upper lip. A racing heart. Every day we manage sensorial and embodied experiences; quite often these negotiations illuminate the ways in which powerful norms and institutions shape our daily lives. This course explores the relationship between the individualized experience of feeling and power by introducing students to the vibrant field of affect studies. A recent "turn" in critical theory, affect theory is interested in embodiment, the senses, and sensorial experience, questioning the dominance of rationality and cognition by exploring the role emotions and feelings play in our social worlds. This course will focus predominantly on affect theory as it emerged from queer, feminist, and racialized minoritarian discourses in order to, ultimately, contemplate the ways theories of affect, feeling, sensation, embodiment, and emotion open up literary and cultural texts.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT302, AMST289, ENGL308
Prereq: None

FGSS315 Entertaining Social Change

"Our problem," Tom Frank writes," is that we have a fixed idea of what power is, of how power works, and of how power is to be resisted." This is especially true of "entertainment" as a transformative power. Our aim will be to advance critical entertainment studies. A thread that connects all of our texts will be: how has the systemic critique of social contradictions been popularized as fascinating in modern times? We will consider the diverse strategies that progressive songwriters/performers, radical historians (working with cartoonists), and mainly moviemakers have developed to entertain Americans--to teach, persuade, provoke, seduce, and move them through laughter, tears, and not least of all ideas--so that Americans will be more inclined to entertain social critique that inspires social change. We will explore the popularizing (and sometimes the selling) of social critique in several genres: graphic history (Howard Zinn, Paul Buhle); songs/song lyrics of folk-protest singers (such as Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and Phil Ochs), of folk-rock stars (such as Jackson Browne, Ani DiFranco, and Father John Misty), and of the developers of hip-hop (such as Gil Scott-Heron, Public Enemy, and NWA); and politically edgy comedy (Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert). We will devote most of our attention to movies (STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON, THE PEOPLE SPEAK, MALCOLM X, MEDIUM COOL, NETWORK, EL NORTE, SMOKE SIGNALS, BEFORE THE FLOOD, THE BLACK PANTHERS: VANGUARD OF THE REVOLUTION, SALT OF THE EARTH, MATEWAN, 99 HOMES, THE WOLF OF WALL STREET, THE BIG SHORT). And we will place special emphasis on self-reflexive movies about entertainment and about labor/social movement organizing.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST315, ENGL309
Prereq: None

FGSS318 Seminar in Eating Disorders

This advanced seminar will explore contemporary psychological theories and multidisciplinary empirical research of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Using eating disorders as an example, we will study how culture, familial factors, and personal vulnerability contribute to risk for psychiatric disorders.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: PSYC350
Prereq: None

FGSS319 Modern Intellectual History in Global Perspectives

Recently, postcolonial critics have urged historians to reconsider the emergence of ideas central to European intellectual history--including reason, society, and human rights--as part of a global process. In this course, we will explore intellectual history in dialogue with the non-West. Topics include the Enlightenment, romanticism, nationalism, modernity, and postmodernity. Discussions will address how these movements took shape through a series of cross-cultural exchanges and exclusions.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM320, COL320
Prereq: None

FGSS320 Staging Race in Early Modern England

This course analyzes the dramatic representation of race in the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. We will examine the historical emergence of race as a cultural construct in relation to related conceptions of complexion, the humoral body, gender, sexuality, and religious, ethnic, and national identity. Readings focus on three racialized groups: Moors, Jews, and Native American "Indians." After reading the play-texts in relation to the historical moment in which they were first produced (using both primary and secondary sources) we will then consider their post-Renaissance performance histories, including literary, theatrical, and film adaptations.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL280, CHUM289, THEA290
Prereq: None

FGSS321 BioFeminisms: Science, Matter, and Agency

This course rethinks feminism's relationship to nature, the body, and biological matter in light of new considerations of ontology in science studies, cultural studies, and feminist thought. We will read contemporary treatments of science, of Darwin and evolutionary theory, of neurobiology and epigenetics, and other fields and disciplines that consider biological matter, and think about them in feminist and queer frameworks. Readings will include "new materialists" alongside other works on the "new biology" and the "new sciences," and we will also revisit some second- and third-wave feminism. The course raises issues that challenge traditional boundaries of the body and self, conventional ideas of agency, and dualisms of mind/body. Readings include works by Donna Haraway, Anne Fausto-Sterling, Elizabeth Grosz, Karen Barad, Vicki Kirby, and Elizabeth Wilson, among others.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Identical With: SISP321
Prereq: None

FGSS323 Survey of African American Theater

This course surveys the dynamism and scope of African American dramatic and performance traditions. Zora Neale Hurston's 1925 play COLOR STRUCK and August Wilson's 2006 play GEM OF THE OCEAN serve as bookends to our exploration of the ways in which African American playwrights interweave various customs, practices, experiences, critiques, and ideologies within their work.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL385, THEA323, AFAM323
Prereq: None

FGSS324 Interpreting the "New World": France and the Early Modern Americas

The impact and long-lasting effects of the "discovery" of the "New World" on Europeans cannot be overestimated. This advanced seminar will compare and contrast styles of expedition and conquest among the European nations, though the course will focus on the French context and the various events and encounters that occurred in the early modern Americas, particularly between 1492 and 1610, a period that laid the groundwork for the subsequent colonial project. Throughout the course, we will pay special attention to the Amerindians' points of view. In turn, students will examine the insights and blind spots in 16th-century French navigators', cosmographers', cartographers', and intellectuals' interpretations, representations, and negotiations of difference by critically engaging with concepts such as nature, culture, alterity, gender, sexuality, marriage, religion, exchange, possession, conquest, and war. Reading, writing, and class discussions will be in French.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: FREN324, COL324
Prereq: None

FGSS326 Queer Times: Poetics, Activisms, Temporalities

This course will analyze literary, visual, and theoretical works from the early 20th century to the present day paying particular attention to relationships among textuality, sexuality, race, temporality, and political activism. Works studied range from iconic modernist writings to contemporary queer activist, artistic, and theoretical production, with a focus on responses to the AIDS epidemic.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL378
Prereq: None

FGSS327 Litanies for Survival, Plots for Revolution

This seminar centers black-feminist and queer-of-color theory, literature, and art from the 1970s to the present in order to interrogate and reimagine revolution and revolutionary praxes. We will examine the interrelatedness of art and activism, hope and despair, collaboration and erotics. Key questions include: How does "survival" put pressure on "revolution," and vice versa, particularly in light of contemporary and imminent catastrophes, local and planetary? How does a joint consideration of survival and revolution affect interpretations of the past, understandings of the present, and imaginings of the future? What political work might intellectual and creative labor perform? Is revolution an event, a practice, or both? A useful term or a ruse?

This seminar is offered in conjunction with the Center for the Humanities' Fall 2018-Spring 2019 theme, "Revolutions: Material Forms, Mobile Futures." Assigned readings will include the work of scholars participating in the Center's Monday night lecture series, and students will be required to attend several lectures over the course of the semester.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM326, AFAM326
Prereq: None

FGSS329 Waiting: Bodies, Time, Necropolitics

This interdisciplinary course draws from social theory, gender studies, medical anthropology, disability studies and science studies to address the social stratification of time in corporeal terms. Many theorists have described the 21st century as marked by acceleration; this course addresses its counterpoint: the slow, interminable wait, the being made-to-wait, and the socially structured scenes and experiences of waiting. How can we understanding waiting in the city emergency room for the mentally ill immigrant? What is it in the gender transition clinic? The polluted, toxic neighborhood? The refugee camp? We will begin by surveying multiple frameworks through which we can theorize time and its suspension. We will then focus on experiences of waiting in intersectional terms, that is, in relation to gender and sexuality, race, class, and dis/ability. We will explore how practices that produce life, health, and well-being (biopolitics) can also be necropolitical, when attention, care, or action is given to some, but prolonged or suspended for others. Readings will include works on necropolitical theory (Georigo Agamben, Achille Mbembe), medical and state subordination and abandonment (Javier Auyero, Joao Biehl), and queer and crip time (Lee Edleman, Elizabeth Freeman, Alison Kafer). We will explore a wide range of experiences of waiting, from those related to cancer diagnosis (Sarah Jain), gender assignment surgery (Alexandre Baril), to environmental toxicity (Michelle Murphy) and asylum seeking (Jennifer Bagelman).
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-FGSS
Prereq: None

FGSS330 Race, Science, Gender, and Species

What does it mean to be human or animal? How are these socially constructed lines drawn, redrawn, enforced, and contested? How are categorizations and contestations surrounding humanity and animality a concern for feminist scholars? How does critical theory help us to understand the (at times) uneasy intersections--or "dangerous crossings," as Claire Jean Kim calls them--where race, species, gender, and theories of science intersect to formulate ideas about humanity and animality? What theoretical and practical possibilities arise from exploring these overlapping taxonomies of power?

This course explores these questions, engaging in an ongoing conversation about how theories of science and law shape ideas about race, gender, and species. We will consider human and animal bodies in science and medicine. We interrogate how the human is a site of political contestation, articulated through colonial and racialized processes that render some lives human/subhuman/nonhuman within hierarchies of power and exclusion. Central to this uneven rendering of what it means to be human is the way law and legal processes criminalize and racialize human beings, and sustain anthropocentrism. Informed by these literatures, we move into exploring the possibilities and limits of posthumanism, with a particular emphasis on work that aims to decolonize posthumanist theory.

Within these theoretical frameworks, we move into thinking about the boundaries of the human/animal body; the politics of being and becoming in multispecies worlds; how fraught cultural and political cases where race and species intersect are negotiated; what the "feral" can add to these entanglements of race, species, and gender; the intertwining logics of species, colonialism, and empire; and how different ways of being embodied can inform a politics of multispecies care. We will conclude our work together for the semester with a collectively curated selection of readings, to be determined by our seminar.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Identical With: SISP330
Prereq: None

FGSS335 The Work of Art Against Work: Art, Labor, Politics

Understandings of late 19th- and early 20th-century avant-gardes are tied inextricably to leftist theory, particularly that of the Frankfurt School. This advanced seminar will consider the legacies of that entwinement, while focusing more specifically on its transformations from the late 20th century to the present: We will examine how artists have engaged the "work" of art in relation to the rise of post-Fordism, a globalized economy, and new theories of work and anti-capitalism. We will pay special attention to gendered notions of work and the division of labor (including "craft," affective labor, domestic work, care work, sex work, and more), to debt and racial capitalism, and to the rise of speculative finance and its links to the art market and the patron class.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM325
Prereq: None

FGSS338 Masculinities

This course examines masculinities and the psychology of men using theories and research findings. We survey a range of perspectives on men and masculinity, drawing from evolutionary theory, cognitive psychology, psychoanalysis, social psychology, and queer theory. We will ask how the psychological attributes associated with men relate to private life and public spaces, and whether our enactments and conceptions of masculinity have changed over time. Exploration of these questions will be informed by both psychological research and close analysis of media representations; the course thus emphasizes methods for examining representations of masculinity in science and the media.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: PSYC338, SISP338
Prereq: PSYC105 OR [FGSS209 or ENGL208]

FGSS343 Imitations of Life: Experimental Bodies at the Interface of Science and Culture

This seminar will examine scientific and cultural practices of corporeal simulation, or, practices of bodily substitution, imitation, and re/modeling. Topics examined will include: reproductive surrogacy; gender reassignment surgeries; experimental subject protocols; prosthetic enhancements; xenotransplantation; biometrics and alternative forms of bodily imaging; the use of nonhuman animals as human proxies; the rise of personalized medicine, and more. Students will engage with a wide range of case studies and theoretical materials from interdisciplinary perspectives. Special attention will be paid to the relationship between scientific discourses of "universality" and "particularity," where socio-cultural forms of difference (e.g., race, gender, disability, etc.) are at once ignored and exacerbated. While most of the material addressed in the class will relate to recent phenomena, we will also be attentive to relevant histories of corporeal differentiation and reimaging.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM, SBS-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM343, AMST343, SISP343
Prereq: None

FGSS345 Women's Lib, Women's Lit

The social movement known as second-wave feminism, but often referred to at the time as "Women's Lib," took center stage in much of the best-selling fiction of the 1970s. This course will look at popular fiction that concerned itself with women's issues and the way it popularized, memorialized, complicated, and contested feminism in the popular imagination. We will look at a range of novels that focused attention on the nature of and possible solutions to women's political, material, and sexual subjection by men. Although our focus will be on the 1970s, we will look at both some important pretexts, and some later responses to the ongoing crises of gendered inequality in the 1980s. We will pay particular attention the gendering of publishing and reception, exploring the contexts in which these books were produced, marketed, reviewed, and read.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL344, CHUM348
Prereq: None

FGSS348 Magic, Sex, and Scholasticism: Tantric Traditions in Asia and Beyond

The word "tantra" conjures many images: ritual feasts on illicit substances, sexual union in the service of religious transformation, alchemical journeys, and explorations of the erotic, the terrifying, and the sublime. But what precisely did tantra look like in practice? Were the worlds of tantra imagined by marginal outcastes? Monastic elites? Or were they just the wild fantasies of Western imperialists?

In this course, we will immerse ourselves in the worlds of tantra, through scriptures, ritual manuals, and art. We will read scholarship on tantra to probe the social and philosophical contexts in which tantra thrived. Finally, we will investigate the history of Western encounters with and appropriations of tantra, from Aleister Crowley to Sting.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RELI
Identical With: RELI348
Prereq: None

FGSS350 Historicizing Early Modern Sexualities

This course will examine recent historical and theoretical approaches to the history of sexuality in early modern English literature (ca. 1580-1680). Our focus will be the historical construction of sexuality in relation to categories of gender, race, religion, and social status in a variety of sources, both literary and nonliterary, verbal and visual, including poetry, plays, masques, medical treatises, travel narratives, and visual media. Topics covered include intersecting constructions of the sexed/gendered/racialized body; diverse sexual practices; sexual identities prior to the homo/hetero divide; and the histories of pornography and masturbation.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL349, CHUM345
Prereq: ENGL201

FGSS351 Queer of Color Critique

This course will examine and interrogate the field of queer studies with particular focus on the ways in which queer scholarship and queer political movements function alongside critical race theory, ethnic studies, and sociopolitical antiracist efforts. Students will be asked to consider the history of queer studies and queer politics, the contemporary state of queer movements, and future visions of queer life. We will take an interdisciplinary approach, and we will rely upon a diverse range of theoretical, historical, and cultural studies texts. We will explore the normative parameters of both sexual and racial identities, probing the terms of identification to consider their meaning in the contemporary moment and in relationship to various cultural, social, legal, and political milieus. Throughout the course we will consider, What does it mean to study queerness and to study race? How do institutions--religious, legal, and scientific--shape our understandings of both queer and racial identities? In what ways do sexuality and race interact, and how does this interaction inform the meanings of each of these identity categories? Furthermore, how have queer movement and scholarship both supported antiracist efforts and, also, how have they been complicit in cultural and institutional forms of racial oppression? How do other social categories of identification such as gender, ethnicity, and class, shape the ways in which we understand expressions of race and queerness?
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST351
Prereq: None

FGSS355 Social Movements Lab

What can we learn from social justice activists about the economic, political, and environmental struggles facing us today, including mass incarceration, immigration, economic precarity, and the violence of the state? Where are the critical sites of queer, trans, left, feminist, black, indigenous, disability, and environmental struggle? How do these movements converge, and where do they diverge?

This participatory, interdisciplinary research seminar enables you to embark on an independent, semester-long research project on the social movement or activism of your choice. We'll start with some foundational reading on multidisciplinary social movement research; archival, ethnographic, and participatory methodologies; and histories of social justice struggles in the U.S. The remainder and majority of the seminar is laboratory style, taking shape around your particular projects. Each week, we will collaboratively analyze one or two projects, mapping out and comparing methods, goals, visions, struggles, and contexts of the movements under study. Our goal is to understand a range of social justice activisms in their economic, political, and historical context, with an eye toward integrating activist scholarship and social change.

The activism you research can be contemporary or historical; local, national, or global; and can take any shape: direct action, community organizing, activist philanthropy, art as activism, etc. You do not need previous experience or activist contacts for this course--just passion and the desire to learn collaboratively!
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM355, ANTH355
Prereq: None

FGSS360 Special Topics: Writing Lives

In this course, students will read profiles, biographies, and theories of biography, texts that focus on the stakes of writing the lives of women, people of color, people with disabilities, and queer subjects. As we analyze these attempts to capture a life, to define the problems of this form, and to expand its possibilities, students will work on their own biographical writing. Throughout the semester, we will ask: Whose lives get written, and by whom? What constitutes evidence of a life, according to whom--and what gets left out? What kinds of research are necessary? How does a writer's relationship to her subject inform such a portrait, and what are the ethics of that relationship?
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL360
Prereq: None

FGSS371 Sister Acts: Black Feminist/Womanist Theater of the African Diaspora

This course surveys the dynamism and scope of contemporary feminist/womanist drama written by black women playwrights of the African Diaspora. Reading select plays from Africa, Canada, the Caribbean, England, and the United States, alongside theory and criticism, we examine the impact of race, gender, identity, and sexuality politics on black feminist/womanist theater. Throughout our study of these dramatic texts, their performances, and their subsequent critiques, we are equally invested in the bridges and the gaps, the audibles and the silences, and the overlaps and the divides, as they are formed. Significantly, this analytic undertaking involves a simultaneous critique of the role of the playwright, the spectator, and the critic of black feminist/womanist theater. At all times, consideration is given to the ways in which these playwrights collectively use theater as a platform to explore black and female and diasporic subjectivities across regional, national, and, at times, linguistic differences.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL371, THEA371, AFAM371
Prereq: None

FGSS386 Women and Politics

In this course we will study a variety of topics related to the theme of women and politics: women's political participation, the gender gap, women in political parties, female leadership, and women's issues. Because women's political engagement is affected by their position in society and in the economy, we will also study topics such as inequality, power, discrimination, and labor force participation. Although we will consider these issues in the U.S., our approach will be strongly cross-national.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: GOVT385
Prereq: None

FGSS390 Politics and Society in Japanese Women's Writing

How have some of modern Japan's most celebrated and insightful authors responded to key events and social conditions in contemporary Japan? What sorts of perspectives have these authors brought to issues of industrial pollution, or to youth crime and social change under capitalism, or to ongoing crises in Okinawa and Fukushima? This course seeks to hear the voices of these authors--and the social actors with whom they engage--by grappling with key modern Japanese literary texts in English translation.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Identical With: CEAS390
Prereq: None

FGSS401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FGSS402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FGSS405 Senior Seminar

This course is a required seminar for senior FGSS majors. Structured as a workshop, the goal of this course is to develop a collaborative intellectual environment for majors to work through the theoretical, methodological, and practical concerns connected with their individual projects. Seminar topics to be examined will be based on students' research projects, and participants are expected to engage critically, yet generously, with the projects of their peers. We begin by addressing feminist methodologies, including questions of praxis, representation, and theory. Participants are expected to lead discussions on readings relating to their own projects, submit written work on their senior research in stages (project proposal, annotated bibliography, drafts), and do class presentations.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Prereq: None

FGSS407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

FGSS408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

FGSS409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FGSS410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FGSS411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FGSS412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FGSS419 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

FGSS420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

FGSS466 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FGSS469 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

FGSS491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

FGSS492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT