Fries Center for Global Studies

Mission

The Fries Center for Global Studies is committed to helping all members of the Wesleyan community achieve the knowledge, language skills, and sensitivity each person will need in order to exercise effective and responsible citizenship in an increasingly interdependent world.

Vision

Our emphasis on intercultural communication, experience, and knowledge reflects the value we place on adaptability, compassion, and cultural self-awareness with respect to the world beyond our borders. These qualities and practices put Wesleyan’s liberal arts program at the forefront of global education and are the hallmark of responsible global citizenship.

Goals & Strategies

The Fries Center for Global Studies pursues it goals by drawing on resources at hand: the Wesleyan curriculum, faculty, student body, and staff; the Office of Study Abroad; Fellowships; Language and Intercultural Learning; and Language Resources and Technology. Our strategies are designed specifically to:

  • Identify and expand opportunities for students and faculty wishing to pursue a global perspective in the field of their choice;
  • Offer the support needed for each department, program, center, and college to develop global perspectives in accordance with its own aims and in partnership with other academic units;
  • Provide a forum for inquiry and debate concerning the pedagogies and administrative strategies best suited to the cultural demands of the contemporary world;
  • Help students transcend disciplines while coordinating their curricular, cocurricular, and extracurricular experiences in accordance with the demands of a global education;
  • Increase the mobility of the Wesleyan student body and faculty in support of a more vibrant cross-cultural debate and in accordance with the needs and goals of each academic unit;
  • Increase the vibrancy of global discussions on campus through facilitating visits to campus by key scholars, artists, and activists;
  • Promote relevant partnerships with peer institutions in the United States and with targeted institutions abroad;
  • Promote collaborative teaching and research across disciplinary and cultural boundaries;
  • Develop curricular opportunities that will allow students to develop a global education tailored to their needs and aspirations.

ARABIC

ARAB101 Elementary Arabic I

This course is a first-year elementary I course in modern standard Arabic (MSA) that will introduce students to the basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. In this level, the class will focus on speaking as an effective way of learning (speak it to learn it). Students will learn Arabic letters and their sounds, write and create basic words and sentences, and be able to converse basic dialogues comfortably in the target language. Oral drills and speaking activities will be done in the classroom, and the class will be conducted primarily in Arabic.
Offering: Host
Grading: Amp Graded
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-LANG
Prereq: None

ARAB102 Elementary Arabic II

This course is a second-semester course in modern standard Arabic (MSA) that will continue to stress the basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The course will focus on speaking as an effective way of learning (speak it to learn it). Students will continue to learn MSA grammar, write and create paragraphs, and begin to converse comfortably in the target language. Students are expected to develop better listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Arabic and to become familiar with Arabic culture. Oral drills and speaking activities will be done in the classroom, and the class will be conducted primarily in Arabic.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-LANG
Prereq: ARAB101

ARAB201 Intermediate Arabic I

This course is a second-year, lower intermediate course in modern standard Arabic (MSA) that will continue to focus on the four basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. In this level, students will be able to speak enough Arabic to communicate at a basic level with a native speaker on a variety of topics. Students should be able to write simple texts on everyday themes and read uncomplicated authentic texts, such as a newspaper article on a familiar topic and storybooks. Students will continue to be familiarized with aspects of contemporary life and culture in the Arab world. Oral drills and speaking activities will be done in the classroom, and the class will be conducted primarily in Arabic.
Offering: Host
Grading: Amp Graded
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-LANG
Prereq: ARAB101 AND ARAB102

ARAB202 Intermediate Arabic II

This course is a second-year, upper intermediate course in modern standard Arabic (MSA) that will continue to focus on the four basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. In this level, students will be able to speak Arabic comfortably enough to communicate with a native speaker on a variety of topics. Students should be able to write simple texts on everyday themes and read uncomplicated authentic texts on familiar or concrete topics, as well as newspaper articles and storybooks. Culture will continue to be integrated in the classroom.The class will be conducted primarily in Arabic.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-LANG
Prereq: ARAB101 AND (ARAB102 OR ARAB201)

ARAB301 Advanced Arabic I

This first semester of third-year Arabic will continue to emphasize the four skills in language learning: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. In addition to the Kalila Wa Dimna fables, students will also read children's stories, literature, and media articles from the Arab world.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-LANG
Prereq: None

ARAB302 Advanced Arabic II

second semester of 3rd year of instruction
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-LANG
Prereq: None

ARAB311 Introduction to Colloquial Levantine Arabic I

This course offers students an introduction to the spoken Arabic of the Levant (Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinian territories). One of the difficulties facing nonnative speakers trying to master Arabic is that very few Arabs can carry on a conversation in modern standard Arabic, so students must be familiar with a colloquial dialect as well as the standard literary language to communicate effectively in Arabic. Although Levantine Arabic is not as widely spoken as is the Egyptian dialect, it provides a useful entry for English speakers into colloquial Arabic, as it is about halfway between the Egyptian dialect and that spoken in Iraq and offers a useful bridge to mastering either dialect. The text for this course uses the Arabic alphabet. Students need to have a thorough knowledge of the Arabic alphabet and writing conventions to take this course. As much of the vocabulary used by the speakers of the Levantine dialect is derived from standard Arabic, this course will help build students' knowledge of basic Arabic vocabulary.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-LANG
Prereq: ARAB201

ARAB401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ARAB402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CENTER FOR GLOBAL STUDIES 

CGST121 Contemporary Social Issues, Leadership, and Scholarship

The overarching purpose for this course is for you to reflect on how your identity (who you say you are) motivates the actions you take now, which, in turn, shape your long-term goals and commitments. This course is particularly applicable to future national and international fellowship applicants, as almost every scholarship foundation asks similar questions (in one form or another): Who are you? What are you proposing to do? In what way are you the most qualified candidate? Why is this work important?

This course will incorporate best practices for writing personal statements and include theories and best practice for this specific writing style as well as a wide array of perspectives to supplement self-reflection, personal development, and skill building.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.25
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CGST
Prereq: None

CGST131B Writing About Places: Africa

This course is one in a series called "writing about places" that explore the long tradition of writing about travel and places and changing attitudes toward crossing cultural borders. We will examine historical and cultural interactions/confrontations as portrayed by both insiders and outsiders, residents and visitors, colonizers and colonized--and from a variety of perspectives: fiction, literary journalism, travel accounts, and histories. Writing assignments will include critical and analytical essays as well as encouraging students to examine their own experiences with places and cultural encounters.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL131B
Prereq: None

CGST132 Writing Medicine and the Doctor-Writer

In this course students read a range of works across a variety of literary traditions, mainly by writers who were also medical practitioners (including Chekhov, Bulgakov, Lu Xun, William Carlos Williams, and Che Guevara), but also nondoctors who write compellingly about medically related subjects (Camus in THE PLAGUE, Tracy Kidder on Paul Farmer, and Anne Fadiman on cultural clashes).
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL132
Prereq: None

CGST136 Writing for Fellowships

National fellowships are prestigious, competitive awards that enable the recipient to pursue graduate study, a research project, or travel abroad. While fellowship winners experience great personal growth and gain credentials that aid future success, preparing the application itself helps students clarify their goals and learn how to present themselves to an unfamiliar audience, such as future employers. In this course students will learn about various fellowship opportunities, identify steps toward building a strong candidacy, and create a portfolio of compelling application materials. To inspire creative thinking, we will read short writings in various genres; authors may include Octavia Butler, Jose Antonio Vargas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, N.K. Jemisin, Ursula Le Guin, and Ocean Vuong. We will then craft personal statements and other fellowship materials, taking them through a rigorous writing process with multiple revisions. By completing the course students will grow as writers and gain skills that can also be used in writing grants and seeking a job.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.25
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

CGST201 Crossing Identities & Borders: Processing Study Abroad

This course is designed to give students who have studied abroad through the medium of a language other than English the opportunity to process their experience by reflecting on its meaning in terms of their own personal and intellectual trajectory. Students will meet as a group once a week to discuss a reading of common interest. The second weekly meeting or workshop will be held in break-out sessions in the target language, during which time students will discuss the capstone project that this course will allow them to develop: a written essay, a digital narrative, an art installation, or a performance. The workshops are designed so that students may support each other in the pursuit of their personal goals regarding a project that reflects the broadest and deepest meaning of an immersive linguistic and intercultural experience abroad. Assessment is based on the following criteria: industry and initiative; the ability to work independently; willingness to contribute actively to a collective, project-based learning experience; and the final project. Readings will address topics such as identity, culture and mobility. Students will work to develop a collective bibliography with classmates as well as a specific bibliography that accords with their personal interests and objectives.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CGST
Identical With: RL&L201
Prereq: None

CGST202 Preparing to Study Abroad: Culture and Language

This course is designed to facilitate students' preparations to study abroad during the following term. Through exploration of intercultural and language learning theories, intercultural communication strategies, and theories about culture, students will build a foundation for their learning and achieving their individual goals during the semester abroad. The course is open to those who are studying abroad in English as well as those who are studying a language. The course is graded at the end of the term, but ungraded check-ins during the study abroad experience are required for the credit to be awarded.
Offering: Host
Grading: Amp Graded
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CGST
Prereq: None

CGST203 Returning from Study Abroad: Integrating Your Experience

This course will facilitate returning students' integration of the study abroad experience into their academic and personal lives. Through guided activities, readings, and weekly writing assignments, students will reflect on the many facets of the study abroad experience and how they relate to identity, academic interests, and future plans, including fellowship applications and career opportunities abroad.
Offering: Host
Grading: Amp Graded
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CGST
Prereq: CGST202

CGST208 ¿Convivencia o conflicto?: Las tres culturas de la España medieval a través del arte (CLAC)

For eight centuries, Muslims, Jews, and Christians lived side by side as neighbors on the Iberian Peninsula in a carefully negotiated state of coexistence known as "convivencia." While much of the written record is full of enmity, religious polemic, and mutual suspicion, the artistic record tells another version, of lives lived in close proximity giving rise to shared cultural practices, artistic tastes, and long interludes of mutual wellbeing. This Spanish-language section complements the ARHA 310 curriculum, by exploring the resonance between medieval experiences of identity, pluralism, appropriation, and exchange and our own uneasy attempts at building a multiethnic, multicultural society. This class will be conducted in Spanish. ARHA 208 is open to intermediate and advanced Spanish learners (SPAN 113 and above), bilingual students, and heritage speakers. Enrollment in ARHA 310 is optional but encouraged.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: None
Identical With: ARHA208
Prereq: None

CGST210 Language and Thought: Introduction to Linguistics

What makes human language unique? This course is an introduction to the study of human language and its underlying properties. Much of our linguistic competence lies below the level of conscious awareness, and linguists seek to uncover the subconscious principles and parameters that govern our knowledge of language. This course first explores the core theoretical areas of linguistics: phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure), syntax (sentence structure), and semantics (meaning). Then, we will explore such topics as the workings of language use, language variation, and first- and second-language acquisition.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CGST
Prereq: None

CGST227 Writing Short Fiction in Spanish

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of writing short fiction in Spanish. It will enhance their command of Spanish and their skills as effective writers through the examination and discussion of many aspects of the craft of fiction writing, which will inform students' own writing and development of their personal style. We will examine essential features of fiction (methods of constructing narrative tension, climax, ambiguity, character, different kinds of autobiographies and descriptions, dialogues, and monologues), as well as various fictional styles through our discussion of the writing of our peers and a study of the texts of a number of contemporary Latin American and Latino writers working in a genre that has been crucial to the region's intellectual production.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: SPAN227
Prereq: SPAN221

CGST230 Between Marx and Coca-Cola: European Cinema of the 1960s and 1970s

In the 1960s and early 1970s, a growing sense of alienation and social unrest spread across Europe, making their marks in both society and cinema. Borrowing the words of New Wave director Jean-Luc Godard, these years led to the emergence of "the children of Marx and Coca-Cola." This course, taught in English, will introduce students to a multi-faceted portrait of Europe in the 1960s and 70s through avant-garde and popular cinema from France, Italy, Spain, Germany, and Eastern Europe. We will focus on films that depict global capitalism, gender relations, and government control. Some of the themes we will discuss include the critique of consumerism and materialism, the changing role of women in society, life under socialism and dictatorship, and youth counterculture. Last but not least, students will learn how New Wave directors challenged traditional approaches to narrative cinema.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CGST
Identical With: RL&L230
Prereq: None

CGST231 Love and Suffering in Ancient Rome (CLAC)

In this CLAC course students with some background in ancient Latin will read selections of the extant sources on love and suffering in Roman myth, history, and thought. The sources that we will cover will be drawn from diverse genres and periods: historiography, epic poetry, lyric poetry, and comedy. This diversity will offer a unique opportunity to students to identify and analyze the intersections of age, class, status, gender, and ethnicity and the way they shaped Roman ideology on "love." We will be looking at how cultural practice shapes language, how ideology shapes law, and how literature challenged cultural norms of love and marriage, all the while unpacking and interrogating the Roman belief that love had no place in the citizen life dedicated to serving the state: love produces suffering. In turn, we will reflect on the ideological shift in the last 150 years that has come to dominate "western" beliefs on love and marriage, that is, "all you need is love," over family, friends, and society, despite the obstacles: suffering produces love.

The selections of readings will be drawn primarily from what the students read in translation in the parent course. The final selection will be based on the level of the students. This CLAC is conceived as appropriate for students on the intermediate and advanced level of ancient Latin.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: LAT230
Prereq: LAT102

CGST250 Body, Soul, and Afterlife Journeys in Ancient Greece (CLAC)

The connection between body and soul and their journey in the afterlife were at the center of how the ancient Greeks thought not only of mortality but also of the good life itself. This CLAC course is connected to the Classical Civilization course titled "Death and Afterlife in Egypt and Greece" that will be taught in the fall by Kate Birney. The parent course explores the archaeology of death and burial in Egypt and Greece. It examines how the funerary practices and the very notions of death, the soul, the body, and the afterlife operated in these societies by drawing upon diverse evidence--archaeological, art historical, and mythological.

In this CLAC course students with some background in ancient Greek will read selections of the surviving evidence on death and the afterlife. Sources will be drawn from diverse genres and periods: historiography, Homeric poetry, Platonic philosophy, and religious tablets. This diversity will offer a unique opportunity to identify different registers and to explore how language itself reflects and in turn shapes the ideas and practices for which it is used. We will thus be looking at: how different media and performances are used to express loss, hope, and heroism in the face of death; how social class, gender, and political ideology are reflected in these media and how they influence ideas about death and the afterlife; and, last, how we are to create adequate methodologies as "readers" of such diverse evidence.

The selections of readings will be drawn primarily from what the students read in translation in the parent course. The final selection will be based on the level of the students. This CLAC is conceived as appropriate for students on the intermediate and advanced level of ancient Greek.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: GRK250
Prereq: GRK102

CGST251 Classical Chinese Philosophy: Chinese Lab (CLAC)

This 0.5 credit course is conducted in Chinese and designed to supplement the standard English-language Classical Chinese Philosophy (PHIL205) course. Students must have taken PHIL205 in the past or be enrolled in it simultaneously. The course will have two main foci: introducing students to modern and contemporary Chinese-language debates about Chinese philosophy and exploring in greater depth the meaning of key passages from the classical works students are reading in translation in PHIL205.

Both advanced learners of Chinese (fourth-year level or above) and native speakers are welcome. Familiarity with classical Chinese is desirable but not required. Assignments will include presentations in Chinese and some written work in English; evaluation will be tailored to each student's language background. If you are unsure whether your language background is sufficient for the course, please contact the instructor.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CEAS
Identical With: CHIN351, PHIL251
Prereq: None

CGST281 Global Economy: Germany and the World in an Age of Extremes, 1870-1957 (CLAC)

This Center for Global Studies discussion course explores the experience of globalization in the German-speaking world from the war of German unification in 1870 to the emergence of the European Community in 1957. It will analyze German imperialism and overseas investment before 1914; the deglobalization of the German economy in the First World War; the problem of reparations and other economic challenges faced by the Weimar Republic; and the impact of global protectionism and the Great Depression, the economic forces allowing the rise of Hitler, the economics of war, and the Nazi "New Order." We will explore the reasons for the ultimate failure of the German war effort and the country's catastrophic destruction and defeat in 1945, as well as Germany's postwar division and occupation as well as the gradual reconstruction and reintegration of the West German economy into a European and global division of labor beginning with the Bizone Agreement and GATT (1947), the Marshall Plan (1948), and the London German External Debt Agreement (1953), culminating in the Treaty of Rome (1957) creating the European Economic Community. The course will be using select German-language historical primary sources to explore this topic, supported by short secondary source narratives in both German and English pitched to intermediate to advanced German speakers/readers. Unlike the parent History lecture class (HIST 280: The Origins of Global Capitalism, 1800-present), this is a discussion course aimed at expanding vocabulary and practicing fluent discussions in the fields of history, politics, and economics.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CGST
Identical With: HIST281, GRST350
Prereq: GRST213

CGST290 Nietzsche als Versucher (CLAC)

The term "Versucher" combines three meanings: (i) a writer of essays, (ii) a maker of experiments and hypotheses, and (iii) a tempter who seductively tests convictions and provokes latent desires. Friedrich Nietzsche draws on all these senses when he proposes "Versucher" as "the not-undangerous name [he] dares to bestow" on the "philosophers of the future"--a coming generation of free spirits who will (finally) be capable of appreciating and continuing his intellectual legacy (Beyond Good and Evil, §42).

This course will interrogate Nietzsche's conception of a philosophical Versucher and examine how this concept might apply to Nietzsche himself: as an experimenter with literary style and genre (including the essay form) and as a polarizing cult figure who has attracted the fascination of generations of teenagers and the most diverse (often diametrically opposed) ideological movements. How is it that Nietzsche inspires such passionate attachment in such radically different readers? What is it about his philosophical style and literary form that cultivates a feeling of intimacy and fierce allegiance while also admitting such aggressively divergent interpretations? To explore these questions, we will read and discuss excerpts from Nietzsche's writings and correspondence alongside texts by his friends and interlocutors--such as Richard Wagner, Paul Rée, and Nietzsche's unrequited paramour, Lou Andreas-Salomé. We will also look at prominent cases of his cultural reception--notably by the Nazi party (due to the influence of Nietzsche's sister, who was a party member) and simultaneously by opponents of totalitarianism such as Robert Musil, Karl Löwith, and Walter Kaufmann.

This course is part of the Fries Center for Global Studies' Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum (CLAC) initiative. It is taught in German and associated with COL290/PHIL252 "Nietzsche - Science, Psychology, Genealogy," though students can take either course independent of the other. No background in philosophy or literature is required for this course, but advanced-intermediate (B2+) reading and spoken German is a must.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: None
Identical With: GRST330, COL287, PHIL253
Prereq: None

CGST291 "Sexuality" in the Making: Gender, Law, and the Use of Pleasure in Ancient Greek Culture (CLAC)

The parent course (CCIV 281/FGSS 281) examines the construction of gender roles in ancient Greece and approaches gender as an organizing principle of private and public life in ancient Greek society by using literary, scientific, historical, and philosophical sources as well as material evidence. Issues addressed include: the creation of woman, conceptions of the male and female body, the legal status of men and women; what constitutes acceptable sexual practices and for whom (e.g., heterosexual relationships, homoeroticism, prostitution etc.); ideas regarding desire, masculinity and femininity, and their cultivation in social, political, and ritual contexts such as rituals of initiation, marriage, drinking parties (symposia), the law court, and the theater.

The textual sources used in the course cover a spectrum of genres: medical texts, Homer, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, law-court speeches, and philosophy among others. In the CLAC connected to this course students with some background in ancient Greek will read selections from these genres and will be able to compare different discourses and registers in the original. In the past, even through brief lexical examples--e.g., pointing at the use of ta Aphrodisia (the things/matters related to Aphrodite) in a culture that has no one term/concept for our notion of "sexuality"--students were intrigued by how different terms and discursive media in the original may offer access to perspectives, visions, and values that differ from and can, in turn, inform our own. The CLAC will create an opportunity precisely for this kind of access and a better informed and nuanced conversation.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: GRK291
Prereq: GRK102

CGST303 Ukraine and Its Environment

International perspectives on environmental issues are critical in order to address the challenges facing the world. Developing an international perspective requires more than learning from printed literature--it requires in-country experience and the desire to be able to view issues through different cultural lenses. This course will provide such experience by learning about the diversity of Ukrainian environments, people, and cultures both in the classroom at Wesleyan and by traveling to Ukraine during Spring Break. During our time in Ukraine we will receive lectures in English from noted scholars, politicians, professors and scientists on topics such as environmental law, global environmental security, urban environment, environmental policy in developing states, and sustainable development for the developing world. We will travel and learn from scientists at Chernobyl about the regeneration of forest ecosystems, learn from agronomists about agriculture on the steppes, and learn from politicians and scholars about Ukrainian environmental policy and their views of U.S. policies. We will also enter into round table discussions with university students to exchange ideas about potential international solutions and approaches to environmental problems. These are just some of the experiences that are planned for our visit. Ukraine, as a pivotal democracy of the former Soviet Bloc, is an amazing place to witness how a nation wrestles with dramatic changes in policy. At the same time Ukraine is culturally diverse, which presents interesting challenges to formulating fair and cohesive policies.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-ENVS
Identical With: ENVS303
Prereq: ENVS197 OR E&ES199

CGST352 The Communist Experience in the Soviet Union (CLAC)

Like the parent course, HIST353: The Communist Experience in the 20th Century, this CLAC course will engage with the problem of experience through a series of themes: subjectivity; engaging in the political process of building socialism; aesthetics; travel and tourism; East and West; race and ethnicity; production and consumption; time and space; political engagement and disengagement; science and technology; and emotions. We will work with sources from oral histories, diaries, film, television, and the press. The final project would involve a close reading and paper on a theme covered in class using both primary and preapproved secondary sources in Russian. The student language background appropriate for this class is (preferably advanced) intermediate to native.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST352, REES352
Prereq: None

CGST412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CGST413 From Black and White to Colors: Israeli Cinema (CLAC)

This Hebrew course will be linked to a new film course, taught in English and offered in spring 2019. The film course is entitled CJST 249: From Black and White to Colors: Israeli Cinema, a Melting Pot Fragmented. This course is targeted towards heritage Hebrew speakers and students with very advanced knowledge of the Hebrew language. Students will view the same films as the parent class with special attention to the Hebrew language. We will analyze, discuss, and write on each of the films. In addition, students will be required to attend all the screenings in the Ring Family Wesleyan University Israeli Film Festival and to meet with native guest speakers. The focus of the course will be to map the cultural and social changes in Israeli society reflected in the transformation in format and themes of Israeli films. This course may be repeated for credit.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CJST
Identical With: CJST413, HEBR413
Prereq: None

CGST492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

Hindi-Urdu Language

HIUR101 Elementary Hindi-Urdu I

An introduction to the modern standard form of the most widely spoken languages in South Asia, this Hindi-Urdu language course offers comprehensive instruction in Hindi and Urdu together from the beginner's level. Hindi, written in the Devanagari script is the official language of the Republic of India. Urdu, written in a modified form of the Perso-Arabic script called Nastaliq, is the official language of Pakistan. In their most basic spoken form, Hindi and Urdu are mutually intelligible, particularly in urban centers in north India.

Students are introduced to both writing systems: the Devanagari script of Hindi and the Nastaliq script of Urdu. The goal of this course is to provide students with a solid foundation in Hindi-Urdu script, grammar, and vocabulary, as well as the cultural awareness and practical experience necessary for basic, yet accurate and appropriate, communication in spoken and written Hindi-Urdu.

Through scaffolding techniques students will reach their potential zone of proximal development (ZPD), which is Novice-Mid, from their current ZPD, which is Novice-Low. Students will learn to confidently navigate a range of common social and "survival" situations in Hindi-Urdu by using simple sentences, short phrases, or formulaic sequences.

Upon completing this course, students will have mastered the basic constructions of Hindi-Urdu grammar and a large body of vocabulary and cultural knowledge necessary for many real-world interactions with Hindi-Urdu speakers.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CGST
Prereq: None

HIUR102 Elementary Hindi-Urdu II

This course is a continuation of Elementary Hindi-Urdu I. It offers a balanced treatment of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing skills. Through scaffolding techniques students will reach to their potential zone of proximal development (ZPD), which is Novice-High, from their current ZPD, which is Novice-Mid.

At the end of the course, students will be able to communicate short messages on highly predictable, everyday topics that affect them directly. They will be able to produce lists and notes, primarily by writing words and phrases. They can provide limited formulaic information on simple forms and documents. These writers can reproduce practiced material to convey the most simple messages. In addition, they can transcribe familiar words or phrases, copy letters of the alphabet or syllables of a syllabary, or reproduce basic characters with some accuracy.

They can understand key words, true aural cognates, and formulaic expressions that are highly contextualized and highly predictable, such as those found in introductions and basic courtesies. They will be able understand words and phrases from simple questions, statements, and high-frequency commands.

Upon completing this course, students will have mastered the core constructions of Hindi-Urdu grammar and a large body of vocabulary and cultural knowledge necessary for many real-world interactions with Hindi-Urdu speakers.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CGST
Prereq: None

HIUR201 Intermediate Hindi-Urdu I

This course is a continuation of Elementary Hindi-Urdu, which emphasizes written expression and texts in both Perso-Arabic and Devanagari script systems.The goal of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to build upon their knowledge of the Hindi-Urdu language and bring them up to the intermediate low/mid-level in all four skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

At the end of this students will be able to successfully handle a limited number of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. Students will be able to produce some of the concrete exchanges and predictable topics necessary for survival in the target-language culture. These topics relate to basic personal information; for example, self and family, some daily activities and personal preferences, and some immediate needs, such as ordering food and making simple purchases. Students will also be able to ask a few appropriate questions; creating and writing statements and formulating questions based on familiar material.

As listeners, students will be able to understand simple, sentence-length speech, one utterance at a time, in a variety of basic personal and social contexts. They will develop accurate comprehension with highly familiar and predictable topics. Intermediate-mid listeners may get some meaning from oral texts typically understood by advanced-level listeners.

As readers, students are able to understand short, noncomplex texts that convey basic information and deal with basic personal and social topics to which the reader brings personal interest or knowledge, although some misunderstandings may occur. Readers at this level may get some meaning from short connected texts featuring description and narration, dealing with familiar topics.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CGST
Prereq: None

HIUR202 Intermediate Hindi-Urdu II

This course prepares students to achieve intermediate low-to-high level speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing skills. With a strong emphasis on achieving proficiency in spoken Hindi-Urdu, students are encouraged to speak Hindi-Urdu as much as possible, both in and outside of the classroom. Enrolled students are encouraged to form study groups that meet regularly outside of class to practice conversation in Hindi-Urdu.

Students will work with a variety of web-based materials to learn songs; watch short film clips and advertisements; and read letters, dialogues, song lyrics, poems, and short stories in Hindi-Urdu. This course will introduce students to many aspects of Hindi-Urdu-speaking cultures through authentic language use, and students will also have the opportunity to participate in the Hindi-Urdu language learning community on campus.

Standard text, course materials prepared by the instructor, and authentic materials available on the internet will be used with equal emphasis on spoken and written Hindi-Urdu. The structure and conversations will be prepared in a variety of authentic contexts of Hindi-Urdu. Students are also offered extensive exposure to spoken language emphasizing speaking and listening at normal speed with near-native pronunciation and intonation. By the end of this course, the students will be at the intermediate-high level of the ACTFL proficiency scale. At this level student are expected to converse comfortably in colloquial Hindi-Urdu on a wide variety of familiar subjects. The students are also expected to be familiar with all forms of Hindi-Urdu grammar and be able to easily use and understand common grammatical forms.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CGST
Prereq: None