Sociology (SOC)

SOC151 Introductory Sociology

This course is an introduction to the systematic study of the social sources and social consequences of human behavior, with emphasis on culture, social structure, socialization, institutions, group membership, social conformity, and social deviance.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: None

SOC202 Sociological Analysis

This course is an introduction to the major components of sociological analysis: the language of sociological inquiry, research techniques and methodology, types of explanation, and the relationship between theory and research.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC212 Sociology and Social Theory

Through close reading, discussion, and active interpretation, this course will critically examine the basic writings of classical and contemporary social theorists who have influenced the practice of sociology.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC231 Sociology of Crime and Punishment

This course provides an introduction to the sociological study of crime and punishment. Crime is rarely far from news headlines or the public imagination. Every day, reports of drug dealing, muggings, and homicide fuel anxiety and debate about the problems of law and order. Here, we consider such debates in the context of both a vision for a just society and the everyday workings of the criminal justice system. The course is divided into three sections. We begin with an introduction to the historical meanings and measures of crime in society and then situate the modern U.S. within this history. In part two, we become familiar with the major ways that social scientists think about criminality and crime prevention. In part three, we turn to considerations of punishment. We ask how punishment is conceptualized in the U.S. and other nations, whether the American system of mass imprisonment is effective, and how we might envision improvements and alternatives.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC234 Media and Society

This course offers an introduction to the study of media, with a focus on critical social perspectives and controversies. A variety of media formats will be considered, with particular attention to print and visual images. The course takes up questions of representation, participation, consumerism, pleasure, and power that have dominated sociological and cultural studies approaches to media since the Frankfurt School. Topics will include advertising and branding, pornography, photojournalism, alternative media, social control, stereotypes, and objectification. Students will engage historical and theoretical texts and will be asked to participate in media processes, including production, interpretation, and critique.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC240 Comparative Race and Ethnicity

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of race and ethnicity in comparative and historical perspective. This is not a course about the experiences of particular races or ethnic groups in any particular part of the world. Rather, this course explores how ideas about racial difference take hold in different parts of the world in different ways and with very different consequences. Through comparisons of Western and non-Western societies, we will investigate how race and ethnicity operate as markers of social exclusion in distinctive ways.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Identical With: AMST244
Prereq: SOC151

SOC241 Mental Illness and Society

Psychiatric disorders are commonly viewed through a purely biomedical and/or a psychological framework. In this course, we will apply a sociological imagination to the topic and interrogate the ways in which mental illness, often seen as a supremely private "personal trouble," is also a public issue. We will read the works of classic and contemporary scholars, but we will also use memoirs and films to sensitize us to the experience of mental illness itself. We will explore mental illness as a social construction, stigma, and labeling theory and explore issues of gender, race, class, and sexual orientation in mental illness.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: None

SOC244 Feminist and Queer Theories of Social Reproduction

This course will introduce students to the study of social reproduction and power with an emphasis on feminist, queer, and transnational approaches to inquiry and action. We will begin by exploring key methodologies and theoretical framings for understanding contemporary "American" cultural, social, and political formations both within and beyond the territorial U.S., focusing on the effectiveness of discursive and historical modes of critical analysis. The subsequent sections of the course will turn to three case studies of the historical routes and transnational implications of U.S.-based political discourses around (1) population control and reproductive justice, (2) abolition and the prison-industrial complex, and (3) debt and higher education. By engaging with each area of inquiry through theoretical, historical, and grounded activist texts, we will think through the possibilities for utilizing academic work in concert with movement-based engaged scholarship to address the uneven distribution of life chances and the potential of imagining the world otherwise.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Identical With: FGSS244
Prereq: SOC151

SOC246 Social Movements

How, when, and why do social movements emerge? What motivates individuals to participate? What transforms problems into grievances and grievances to action? How should movements be organized, and what tactics should they use? What factors explain movement success and failure (and how should success and failure be defined)? What is a social movement, anyway? This course seeks to introduce some of the major ways scholars have approached such questions and, at the same time, to give a sense of both the high drama and the everyday details of social movement activism, using historical and sociological case studies. Course readings concentrate on U.S. movements, including racial justice, class, gender, and sexuality-based activism.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Identical With: AMST246, FGSS256
Prereq: SOC151

SOC247 Drugs, Culture, and Society

This course addresses a variety of issues ranging from the social variation in and construction of drug experiences; the nature of scientific knowledge regarding drug use and the brain; the global trade in drugs and its relationship to histories of colonialism and contemporary forms of Western hegemony; notions of health, harm, and rehabilitation; and the various strategies that contemporary states rely upon in addressing issues pertaining to drug use (particularly criminal justice measures and interventions focused on harm reduction). The course places particular emphasis on the ways drug use is framed in relation to questions of freedom, justice, and the self, ultimately forming a part of a disciplinary apparatus that impacts everyone, whether we directly use drugs or not.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC256 Sex Work and Sex Trafficking: Empowerment, Exploitation, and the Politics of Sex

This course explores the history, politics, and social meaning of sex work. Focusing particularly but not exclusively upon prostitution, we will pay careful attention to the diverse range of social experiences that form sex work, as well as the way in which prostitution is used as a governing metaphor within sexual relations more generally. Some questions the course will consider: How has sex work changed over time, and what do these changes tell us about both the nature of sex work and about the broader society? In what ways is sex work similar to or different from other forms of service labor or other types of intimate relationship? How do questions of race, class, sexuality, and gender alter the meaning and experience of sex work? What sorts of desires and expectations do clients bring to interactions with sex workers, and in what ways have these shifted over time? Recent controversies concerning sex trafficking and underage prostitution will also be addressed, as will the effects of various regulatory schemes that have been developed around the world.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Identical With: FGSS255
Prereq: SOC151

SOC257 Applied Data Analysis

In this project-based course, you will have the opportunity to answer questions that you feel passionately about through independent research based on existing data. You will develop skills in generating testable hypotheses, conducting a literature review, preparing data for analysis, conducting descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, and presenting research findings. The course offers one-on-one support, ample opportunities to work with other students, and training in the skills required to complete a project of your own design. These skills will prepare you to work in many different research labs across the University that collect empirical data. It is also an opportunity to fulfill an important requirement in several different majors.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-QAC
Identical With: QAC201, GOVT201, PSYC280, NS&B280
Prereq: None

SOC259 Cultural Studies of Health

Nothing is more fundamental to the human condition than our most basic right--the right to healthy life. Tragically, this right is inequitably distributed across human bodies and populations, especially along axes of race, gender, class, age, and nationality. In fact, persons residing in the U.S. do not have a right to healthy life. Issues of health and illness are, quite literally, matters of life and death that are shaped by broader political and economic institutions in human societies. In neoliberal nation states like the U.S., the guardian of the right to live a healthy life is a highly bureaucratic and technological form of corporate medicine. Medicine comprises a network of social institutions and technoscientific practices that people have created and use to diagnose and heal our bodily and psychic ills. While the practice of medicine has produced dramatic improvements in life expectancy and quality of life for billions of people, most people on the planet do not have access to basic medical care. Who thrives, who gets sick, who dies, and why constitute core questions for social justice.

This course investigates the complex embroidery of biosocial and cultural processes that shape the unequal experiences and meanings of health. Cultural studies of health document the role of medicine as a great instrument of power that both generates and alleviates suffering. As more and more areas of social life and parts of bodies are falling under the control of medicine (a process called medicalization), we must ask, What are the dynamics and implications of medicalization for human societies and cultures? Drawing on provocative readings and media from diverse fields in sociology and cultural studies of science, technology, and medicine, this course will investigate these questions and more with an emphasis on the answers to them might contribute to social justice and improve the conditions necessary for human thriving.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SISP
Identical With: SISP262, AMST272
Prereq: None

SOC260 Sound and Screen

This course explores contemporary developments in the study of media, focusing on three primary areas--music, video games, and the Internet--that depart from and sometimes challenge earlier frameworks rooted in visual and narrative forms. In the first unit of the course, we will examine the relation of music to identity formation, as well as revisit media scholars' longstanding interest in questions of meaning in light of music's particular characteristics. In the second unit of the course, we will investigate the social dimensions of video game play, focusing on the often-overlooked seriousness of play and on the unique properties of games as rule-bound systems. In the third unit, we will review and "unpack" some of the social, psychological, economic, and bodily transformations thought to be instigated by Internet use. Overall, the course aims to revisit sociologists' and media scholars' preoccupation with power, inequality, freedom, autonomy, and agency in light of the contemporary prevalence and particular characteristics of sonic and interactive media.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC269 Bad Sex

In a 2003 op-ed in support of same-sex marriage, conservative New York Times columnist David Brooks writes, "Anybody who has several sexual partners in a year is committing spiritual suicide. He or she is ripping the veil from all that is private and delicate in oneself, and pulverizing it in an assembly line of selfish sensations." Brooks is far from alone in this critique of promiscuity. What is it about "casual encounters" and hookup culture that so disturbs? Why is sex a magnet for anxieties about selfishness and irresponsibility? Why do we think of anonymity and intimacy in sex as mutually exclusive? What do we make of desires that are politically troubling? On what basis are particular forms of sex and sexuality vilified or valued? Is love the antidote to sexual hedonism, or hedonism in disguise? This course will consider widespread cultural anxieties about sex, sexuality, desire, and pleasure from sociological and psychoanalytic perspectives.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: None

SOC270 Urban Societies

This course is a study of the social construction of the city focused primarily on the U.S. context. It examines various themes related to the development of modern cities beginning with the consolidation of capitalism during the industrial revolution. The class will consider the distinct experience of urban life as opposed to other modes of existence, or what Louis Wirth calls "Urbanism as a Way of Life." In addition, students will look at forms of stratification such as race and class inequality and their relationship to spatial issues such as suburbanization and revitalization. Also considered are contemporary issues such as globalization, the revival or renewal process of many American cities, environmental issues, as well as the effect of new media on how we conceptualize the city. All of this will be done by focusing on the relationship between individual experiences and the effect of the urban environment on issues of identity construction and interpersonal relations. In order to develop critical thinking and engagement around these urban issues, the course emphasizes weekly writings and class participation in development towards a final paper.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC284 Memory and Violence

This course offers historical, theoretical, and empirical perspectives to the study of personal and collective violence and memory. We will examine the intersections of biography, history, and memory in reference to traumatic events, ranging from personal abuse to mass atrocity. The course focuses on issues around memory--from memorialization and truth commissions to memoir and PTSD--in the aftermath of various types of violence. The central questions about the nature and politics of memory following traumatic events will entail conversations about the construction of personal and collective identities and the complexities of justice and healing.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC293 Pleasure and Power: The Sociology of Sexuality

This course seeks to denaturalize some of what are often the most taken-for-granted aspects of daily life: our bodies and genders, our erotic desires, and our sexual identities. To this end, this course will provide a critical-historical overview of dominant Euro-American understandings of sexuality and their embodied legacies.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Identical With: FGSS293
Prereq: SOC151

SOC299 The Future Perfect

Sociology is typically preoccupied with the present and, to a lesser extent, the past, favoring empirical methods that aim to reveal a variety of truths: for example, the logics underlying social structures and systems, the causes of social inequality, and the mechanisms by which inequality is reproduced. Where does this leave the future? Despite the persistence of patterns of social life, the future remains always and ultimately undetermined. We cannot know it; we can only imagine, speculate, and fantasize. The future, it seems, belongs to the world of fiction: to novels, films, television shows, and music that offer visions of what it might hold. These visions are sometimes suffused with hope for a changed world and sometimes with anxiety at the prospect of change. What can we learn about the present from images of the future? Might they offer an antidote to suspicions that we are headed toward a future of increased inequality and scarcity and looming environmental catastrophe? What traps might we find ourselves in when we treat the future as a distinct category of time? This course pairs social theory with works of fiction in addressing these questions.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151 AND SOC212

SOC302 Paternalism and Social Power

This course will consider the construction of caring and helping in the structuring of social relations. What does helping entail? How does power operate in the velvet glove? What, if anything, lies beyond paternalism? How does social change occur? Competing perspectives on paternalism from within social and political theory will be considered as vehicles for tracing power dynamics in a survey of U.S. social formations related to family, gender, sexuality, race, labor, class, medicine, criminal justice, religion, environmentalism, and international relations.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: None

SOC307 Authenticity and Its Others

This course will examine scholarly and popular conceptions of authenticity and inauthenticity. How do notions of authenticity function within contemporary culture? What are the various inauthentic others to which authenticity is juxtaposed?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC308 Baby Got Back: Embodiment, Gender, and Sexuality in Black Music

This multimedia course uses a sociocultural approach to explore how black bodies continue to be sized, classed, sexed, and gendered through black musical expression. We will examine black music as a cultural object, both embedded in and responsible for steering national cultures, to argue that black music is indeed a lens through which to examine the struggles, contradictions, and triumphs of black peoples in the U.S. and abroad. Connecting theoretical frameworks of race, embodiment, socioeconomic status, gender, and sexuality with: (1) visual cultures of black bodies in motion (stemming from minstrelsy and chitlin' circuits to musicals and music videos) and (2) a variety of songs written, produced, and/or performed by black musicians (that include but are not limited to: the blues, jazz, rock and roll, rhythm & blues, soul, afrobeat, hip hop, dancehall, pop, soca, hip life, and reggaeton), this class will seek to interrogate how black music creates, replicates, regulates, packages, and distributes identity through a paradigm of production and consumption. We will discuss topics such as commodification, resistance, and representation while listening to artists such as Nina Simone, Sir Mix-A-Lot, Las Crudas, former 2 Live Crew member Luke, Biggie Smalls, Mr. Killa, De La Soul, Lil' Kim, Outkast, Jill Scott, Ayisoba, Big Freedia, Alison Hinds, Nicki Minaj, and Fela Kuti to attempt to understand exactly what type of power (and magic) that music possesses.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC309 America's Lure: The Politics of the Transnational US University

Over the course of the last decade the number of international students traveling to the United States has more than doubled. As of 2016, over a million students travel annually to U.S. campuses. In popular culture, governmental rhetoric, and statements from university administrators, this movement has been ascribed to the "lure" of American institutions of higher education and the knowledge, prestige, and futures they are thought to provide access to while simultaneously providing evidence of the successful internationalization of the U.S. university. Students will engage queer, feminist, postcolonial, indigenous, and critical race studies as we historicize and theorize this phenomenon while grappling with the transnational dynamics of the U.S. university from its founding as a central institution of settler colonialism in the 17th century through to the current moment of the so-called global, neoliberal university.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Identical With: AMST210
Prereq: None

SOC311 Abolitionist University Studies

This course explores historical materialist theorizations of the practices and future possibilities of the U.S. university as a tool of social reproduction and space of potentially revolutionary thought. In so doing, the readings, assignments, and discussion will be inspired by Stefano Harney and Fred Moten's provocation to reinterpret abolitionism as "not so much the abolition of prisons but the abolition of a society that could have prisons, that could have slavery, that could have the wage, and therefore not abolition as the elimination of anything but abolition as the founding of a new society." Students will consider how conventional renderings of the university in higher education studies, critical university studies, and the popular cultural imaginary are predicated upon an often romanticized and fundamentally limited geographic and historical understanding of the work of colleges and universities. In response, the course cultivates a more capacious conceptualization of the historical and contemporary function of the university as a social form. In taking up abolitionism as both a method and critical analytic, the course will challenge students to imagine the revolutionary possibilities of an abolition university that aligns itself with movements beyond the institution, while reflecting on the particular importance and challenge of enacting such a vision in our current political moment.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM311, AMST270, FGSS311
Prereq: None

SOC313 Time, Masks, Mirrors: Aging in America

Longevity is almost universally wished for, but its actual accomplishment may also invite fear, even dread, depending on the context in which it occurs. We will study the socio-cultural meanings of aging in the US as they are informed by history (collective and personal), cultural background, social scripts, caregiving relationships, institutional support/constraint, and current conceptualizations of the life course and the "aging" mind and body that often rely heavily on categorization and vocabulary associated with biomedicine. In addition, we will explore the idea of age in relation to sustainability and disposability as it is applied to dwellings, objects, the natural environment, and even persons. Enrolled students will be introduced to qualitative methods and analysis of qualitative data through conducting a series of interviews with an elder living in the local community that focus on the relationship between place and well-being over the life course, culminating in a record that can be shared with others.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: None

SOC315 The Health of Communities

Our focus will be on understanding the role of social factors (e.g., income, work environment, social cohesion, food, transportation systems) in determining the health risks of individuals; considering the efficacy, appropriateness, and ethical ramifications of various public health interventions; and learning about the contemporary community health center model of care in response to the needs of vulnerable populations. We explore the concept and history of social medicine, the importance of vocabulary and the complexity of any categorization of persons in discussions of health and illness, ethical issues related to the generation and utilization of community-based research, the role of place and the importance of administrative and cultural boundaries in the variability of health risk, and the idea of just health care. Enrolled students serve as research assistants to preceptors at the Community Health Center (CHC) of Middletown.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.25
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Identical With: SISP315
Prereq: None

SOC316 Community Research Seminar

Small teams of students will carry out research projects submitted by local community groups and agencies. These may involve social science, natural science, or arts and humanities themes. The first two weeks of the course will be spent studying the theory and practice of community research. Working with the community groups themselves, the teams will then design and implement the research projects.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Identical With: ENVS316
Prereq: None

SOC320 Life and Death: Relations of Biopower and Necropower

This seminar is an advanced examination of how science and technology shape the politics of life and death. We will consider how science and technology have become handmaidens to human (and, in some cases, not human) life and death, impacting the social, legal, and ethical frameworks we use to define what constitutes the embodied, relational, and conceptual space between "alive" and "dead." Using theories of biopower and necropower as our guides, we will cover a diverse set of themes including sexual reproduction, birth, population, toxicity, decay, genocide, mortality, and the afterlife as they intersect with modern institutions of power. We will ask, How can we better understand the ways in which social institutions and actors deploy sciences and technologies to foster health or manufacture death?
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SISP
Identical With: SISP320
Prereq: None

SOC322 The Sociology of Nina Simone

An artist, activist, and visionary, Nina Simone possessed both a talent and political platform that continues to permeate discussions inside and outside the walls of academia. Born Eunice Kathleen Waymon, Simone was trained as a classical pianist that would eventually travel the world to perform music that encompassed the struggles of black life. This course acknowledges that her music, with pieces such as "Mississippi Goddam" and "To Be Young, Gifted and Black" undoubtedly made social, cultural, and political contributions to American society. However, much of Simone's personal life, including her battles with racism, sexism, and mental illness, as well as her relationships with her contemporaries, like Lorraine Hansberry and Miriam Makeba, is often eclipsed by and not considered alongside with her body of work. This course will examine Nina Simone as a whole person, wrought with contradictions, that poured her life experiences into her music, often at the expense of her own success. This class will: sociologically examine the emergence of such a person by interrogating the social environments that impacted her views on social justice; deploy black feminist and womanist analytical frameworks to deeply understand how white supremacist capitalist patriarchy may have taken a toll on Simone's career, but ignited her passion to speak truth to power; and utilize cultural and sociological paradigms of framing, stratification, and symbolic interaction to fully understand the sociology of Nina Simone.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC326 Race, Fantasy and Fetish

What role do fantasy and fetish play in the making and unmaking of race? How might fantasy and fetish disrupt and reinforce power differentials in surprising or unexpected ways? From comic book heroes to `race play¿, this course explores how bodies, relationships, and space itself are fetishized in the racial imagination. It moves beyond the basic observation that race is socially constructed to consider how fantasy, desire, and fetish render such constructions volatile and spectacular, yet also banal and predictable.

We will discuss the historical and social context of race as both imagined and imaginary in relation to western fantasies of the self and object others. This course draws on texts from race, queer, and postcolonial theory, along with popular material, including fantasy fiction and film, to highlight the fantastical underpinnings of the everyday realities of racial difference.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: SOC151 AND SOC240

SOC399G Advanced Research Seminar: Introduction to Critical University Studies

The university is in crisis, or so we are often told. With college and university budgets rapidly shrinking, tuition and student debt are increasing exponentially, especially for women and students of color. And yet, we're here. Students, instructors, and staff continue to look to the university as a productive space for thinking and working. As an academic field dedicated to a collective engagement with the ways power constitutes bodies, knowledge, and ways of being in the world, sociology is a key venue for contending with these processes. This course will introduce students to the emerging field of critical university studies through a feminist, queer, and anti-racist frame. What, we will ask, does it look like to think in and about the university at this historical moment? What does it mean to consider the university's history in relationship to power and the nation-state? What are the gender, sexual, class, and racial politics of knowledge production? And how can we most productively take up the university itself as an object of scholarly inquiry?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC399H Advanced Research Seminar: Hot Mamas: Black Women, Sexuality, and Body Size

Black women, no matter where they were born or currently live in the world, deploy survival strategies that propel them past perceived deviances and into discursive spaces of dynamic personhood. This is especially true for fat black women and how they navigate their respective identities in the areas of social, physical, and mental health; socioeconomic status; and beauty culture. In this class, we will interrogate these areas alongside blackness, womanhood, and sexuality to fully consider the implications of body size as a substantial category of intersectional analysis. By bringing medical and sociological studies into conversations with political and feminist theory, while also engaging with literary pieces and popular culture, this interdisciplinary course aims to equip all of us with a deeper understanding of sexuality and body size and their significance in the lives of black women. We will journey our way through this course using the works of black feminists such as Patricia Hill Collins, theorists such as Michel Foucault, sociologists such as Samantha Kwan, political scientists such as Cathy Cohen, lawyers such as Dorothy Roberts and Paul Campos, and writers such as Lucille Clifton and Alice Walker. In addition, we will bring our lived experiences and proximity to popular culture (magazines, music, films, and online resources such as personal blogs) to stake out our own truths and fill out any gaps that we believe are present in the literature. The class will mix lecture, class discussion, group presentations, and small-group work to advance mastery of the material.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC399I Advanced Research Seminar: Assembling the Self

This advanced research seminar is open to sociology majors in their senior year or in the second semester of their junior year and fulfills the capstone requirement for the major. The course is divided in two halves. In the first half, we will read a variety of autoethnographic texts, in which the authors use personal experience as a foundation for sociological reflection and insight. We will spend time thinking about the political and methodological benefits and limitations of autoethnography, surveying a range of approaches to incorporating one's experience into scholarship, and attending to the ways that autoethnographic texts respond to existing research and theory. In the second half of the class, students will develop a substantial and original autoethnographic essay, with class sessions focused on workshopping and presenting writing in progress.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC399J Adv. Res. Sem: The Hair Class

Hair does things. It covers and exposes us. We pluck, conceal, wax, curl, and otherwise manage it. Its presence and absence serve as sites of critical engagement, personal and cultural expression, and political strife. This course will explore the social significance of hair, wherever and on whomever it grows (or fails to grow). We will discuss daily practices, politics, histories, and legends about the manipulation of human and animal hair. We will draw on social theory, visual and social analyses, and cultural commentary to understand hair follicles as both incredibly ordinary and fantastically bizarre. This is an advanced discussion-based research seminar that is writing-intensive.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151 AND SOC212

SOC399K Advanced Research Seminar: Law & Society

In this course we will explore law from a sociological perspective, in relation to the historical, political, and cultural contexts within which it exists.

- We will tackle the question, what is law?

- We will talk about the relationship between law and justice.

- We will discuss social phenomena as legal constructions. Who is a person? What constitutes a religion? What is gender? What is commerce? What is free speech? These questions find myriad answers in different bodies of thought, are understood and acted upon in a variety of ways by different social groups, and gain different levels of political salience in different societies and at different times. As matters concerning the organization of public life, they are also, and inevitably, framed as "legal problems" and make their way to courts. We will examine how courts construct social phenomena through the lens of several historical cases.

- We will talk about law and American government--the historical evolution of the relationship between the branches of government, and the changing role and politicization of the Supreme Court.

- We will learn about courtroom exchanges, and how race, gender, and class play out in a typical American courthouse.

- We will explore law as a professional field, and discuss the educational and professional formations of its major actors.

This course will involve writing a research paper.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: SOC151

SOC399L Advanced Research Seminar: The Social Body

This advanced research seminar is open to sociology majors in their senior year or in the second semester of their junior year and fulfills the capstone requirement for the major. The course is divided in two halves. In the first half, we will survey topics, perspectives, and approaches within the sociology of the body--a disciplinary subfield that examines the human body as a site where the social materializes and is rendered legible--as well as considering more generally the craft of academic scholarship. Substantive topics will include ADHD, anorexia, pain/pleasure and disability, and racial/ethnic cosmetic surgery. This overview will serve as a foundation for the second half of the course, in which students will develop a substantial and original research essay, with class sessions focused on workshopping and presenting writing in progress.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: None

SOC401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

SOC402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

SOC403 Department/Program Project or Essay

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

SOC404 Department/Program Project or Essay

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

SOC405 Sociology Thesis Seminar

The purpose of the seminar is to help senior sociology majors develop their senior thesis projects by introducing them to the conceptual challenges and practical problems of sociological research. The seminar meetings will be devoted primarily to helping students advance their own research projects.
Offering: Host
Grading: Amp Graded
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: (SOC151 AND SOC212 AND SOC202)

SOC406 Sociology Thesis Seminar

The purpose of the seminar is to help senior sociology majors develop their senior thesis projects by introducing them to the conceptual challenges and practical problems of sociological research. The seminar meetings will be devoted primarily to helping students advance their own research projects.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SOC
Prereq: (SOC151 AND SOC202 AND SOC212)

SOC407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

SOC408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

SOC409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

SOC410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

SOC411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

SOC412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

SOC419 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

SOC420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

SOC420A Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U

SOC465 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

SOC466 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

SOC467 Independent Study, Undergraduate

Credit may be earned for an independent study during a summer or authorized leave of absence provided that (1) plans have been approved in advance, and (2) all specified requirements have been satisfied.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

SOC468 Independent Study, Undergraduate

Credit may be earned for an independent study during a summer or authorized leave of absence provided that (1) plans have been approved in advance, and (2) all specified requirements have been satisfied.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

SOC469 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

SOC491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

SOC492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT