2021-2022 Edition

Academic Catalog

Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC105 Foundations of Contemporary Psychology

This course will include an introductory-level presentation of ideas and research findings in the major areas of psychology. It will serve as both preparation for upper-level courses in psychology and as a valuable contribution to students' liberal arts education. This course will help students discover what psychology is and what psychologists do. Not only will students learn the basic content of psychology, but the course should help them to think critically about such everyday issues as, In what ways are we like other humans, and how do we differ? What do babies perceive and think? Why do we dream? Content areas include history of psychology, methods of psychological research, biological basis of human behavior, motivation and emotions, learning and memory, sensation and perception, cognitive and social development, personality, intelligence, and psychopathology.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC111 Myth, Magic, and Movies

We will examine how the mythic is made and what purposes myth and magic serve in modern culture. Guided by classic psychoanalytic ideas, we will seek to understand both the conscious and unconscious power of myths. The seven volumes in J. K. Rowling's HARRY POTTER series will be the core texts for the course, and we will explore how these texts were transformed by the eight Potter movies.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC112F Psychoanalysis Then and Now: From Freud to Psychosocial Studies (FYS)

Psychoanalysis appears to be little more than an anachronism within the context of modern Psychology, and yet it nonetheless is leading a surprising afterlife--at once defunct as an institutional player and yet at the vanguard of cultural theory and clinical psychology practice. This course traces the trajectory of Psychoanalysis from its origin in Freud's theory of unconscious mental processes and his talking cure to its current manifestations in the field of Psychosocial Studies. We consider how psychoanalysis is an inherently critical practice with the capacity to uniquely situate an individual in relation to social forces that have influenced their personal development, without reducing a person to their social context and/or family history. The course begins with exploration of foundational psychoanalytic concepts (the unconscious, transference, resistance, the drives) and moves to consider the dimensions of social-unconscious processes in groups, institutions, and nations. We also explore how psychoanalysis can inform the psychosocial study of subjectivity, ideology, the intergenerational transmission of trauma, and current sociopolitical issues.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC113F What is "Typical?" Diversity in Human Development (FYS)

Much of psychological research aims to describe & understand human behavior by studying how typical people think or act in typical circumstances. However, quite a lot can be learned by looking beyond the average and examining the variability of human behaviors, experiences, and abilities. This First Year Seminar will explore the ways that atypical development, neurodivergent minds, and non-normative populations can broaden our understanding of human development. Students will develop academic writing skills while critically engaging with psychological research.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC114F Race in Everyday Space: The Psychological Impacts of Racism (FYS)

"We are all products of a racialized society, and it affects everything we bring to our interactions" (Oluo, 2018, p. 15). This seminar uses psychological theory and research as well as interdisciplinary scholarship (e.g., ethnic studies, history, sociology) to critically unpack this statement. Through the semester we examine the nature and experience of racially marginalized communities in the United States, and engage in critical analysis of the ways in which systems of power affect the everyday lives of racially marginalized communities. As a First Year Seminar, this course will emphasize the continued development of written and verbal communication skills.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC115F Your Brain on College: Applying Neuroscience to College Life (FYS)

This course introduces first-year students to reading, writing, and discussing research in neuroscience. We will cover topics related to how the brain perceives and changes in response to experiences that are common in college or university, including building friendships, learning new information, time management, and coping with stress. Students will be encouraged to apply research to their own experiences through several short writing reflections. Students will also develop an APA-style literature review over the course of the semester.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC138F Masculinities (FYS)

This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of masculinities, focusing on the difficulty of disentangling the (social-) scientific questions of what men are (and how they come to be that way) from the interpretive question of what masculinity means. We will survey a range of perspectives from evolutionary theory, cognitive psychology, psychoanalysis, social psychology, anthropology, feminist studies, and queer theory that describe and attempt to account for masculinities. In order to understand how these scholarly accounts might fit together to form a more comprehensive interpretive framework, we will also be engaging in critical analysis of examples from contemporary television and film that will help us to understand the role that representation plays in our cultural constructions of masculinity.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-COL
Identical With: COL138F
Prereq: None

PSYC200 Statistics: An Activity-Based Approach

This course will introduce the concepts and methods used in the analysis of quantitative data in the behavioral and life sciences. The approach will emphasize activity-based learning. Lectures will be used for the initial presentation and wrap-up of topics, but most class time will be devoted to activities in which students perform analyses. The topics covered will include descriptive statistics, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and regression.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC201 Psychological Statistics

This course provides a general introduction to the use of statistics in everyday life and in psychological research. Special emphasis will be placed upon the development of critical thinking skills for evaluating the validity of statistically-based claims found in the media and in published research. In addition, the course will focus on the practical application of statistics and the logical connection between various analytic techniques. Both descriptive and inferential statistics will be discussed, and students will learn to clean and analyze data using Microsoft Excel and specialized statistical software (e.g., SPSS and/or R).
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105 OR PSYC101

PSYC202 Qualitative Research Methods in Psychology

The goal of the course is to introduce students to basic research strategies for investigating human thought and behavior, with a focus on qualitative methods. The course provides detailed introduction to different qualitative methods, including interview, observation, case study, content analysis, archival, life history, and narrative techniques. Attention is given to the framing of research questions, design of studies, the ethics of psychological research with humans, and assumptions about human nature. The course is problem- and project-based, providing hands-on research experience.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC204 Methods of Interpretation

Projects incorporating issues of race, gender, and class will be the focus of this methods course. Feminist, phenomenological, experiential, textual, and ecological methods of interpreting gender, race, and class in multimedia formats will be explored.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC261

PSYC205 Research Methods in Psychopathology

How do psychological researchers study unusual and distressing human experiences? This combined laboratory and lecture/discussion course provides an introduction to methods used in the study of clinical and subclinical phenomena. With an emphasis on methodological pluralism in the 'psy' disciplines, the course covers both quantitative and qualitative approaches, exploring the intersections between diverse modes of inquiry. Throughout the semester, students conduct a team research project on a psychological topic of the group's choosing, proceeding through each stage of the research process. Along the way, we consider the historical context of psychological science, as well as contemporary debates about the nature of psychopathology. We also think critically about the relationship between research methods and the topic(s) under investigation, asking questions such as: Why do psychologists use the methods that they use? How is research in psychology different from research in the other sciences and humanities?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC206 Research Methods in Cognitive Development and Education

This course introduces students to translational research in psychology--research that draws on psychological science to inform practice. The first third of the course will cover basic research methods, fulfilling the requirement for the major and preparing students to critically read, interpret, and engage in research. Then, we will investigate a series of case studies in which people have attempted to take basic research in developmental science and apply it to education settings. Example research-based interventions we might choose to study include mindfulness, growth mindset, early numeracy, reading instruction, teacher development, and anti-bias education. We will ask questions like: Which aspects of the research did the interventions account for, and which aspects were set aside? What are the factors that facilitate or block the use of research in practice? How are research-based interventions evaluated, and how do the outcomes of those evaluations affect our interpretations of the original research findings? What tradeoffs are made when putting research findings into the real world? How do seemingly small details about how interventions are designed and implemented affect the research-practice interface? Through our discussions, we will cover some core topics located at the bridge between research and practice such as practitioner expertise, science communication, participatory action research, educational design, and implementation science.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC207 Research Methods in Developmental Psychology

The goal of this course is to introduce students to basic research strategies and methods, with a focus on those pertinent to developmental psychology. Course materials will focus on conceptual, design, and analytic issues. This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and understanding to conduct and evaluate research. In the service of these goals, students will participate in lectures, readings, discussions, and hands-on projects.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC208 Research Methods on Emotion

This course will focus on methods and techniques to study emotions in their social context, including emotional narratives, interviews, experiments with emotional stimuli (e.g., mood induction), surveys, and daily diaries. We will investigate which methods and techniques are best suited to study various positive and negative emotions. The course will give special attention to ethical issues in emotion research.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC200 OR QAC201 OR ECON300

PSYC209 Research Methods in Ecological-Community Psychology

The focus of this course is to introduce the student to the historical and conceptual foundations of ecological and community psychology. Special emphasis will be placed on research ethics and framing research questions that address social problems. Students will learn about study design and mixed-method approaches that will provide a foundation to engage in research and practice.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC210 Research Methods in Cognition

This course will examine the experimental method as a means of gaining knowledge about human cognition. Students in this course will learn about general research methods in cognitive psychology related to experimental design, understanding and interpreting research, and ethical issues involved in research with human subjects. Classic research paradigms in cognitive psychology will be explored through the use of interactive demonstrations and in-class experiments.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B210
Prereq: (PSYC105 AND PSYC200) OR (PSYC105 AND ECON300) OR (PSYC105 AND QAC201)

PSYC211 Research Methods in Clinical Psychology

The goal of this course is to introduce students to basic research strategies and methods of psychological science, with a focus on those most relevant to clinical psychology.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: (PSYC105 AND PSYC200) OR (PSYC105 AND [QAC201 or GOVT201 or PSYC280 or NS&B280]) OR (PSYC105 AND ECON300)

PSYC213 Research Methods in Social Psychology

The course examines research methods and techniques used in social psychology, including observation, correlation, and experimentation. Students will learn about study design, research ethics, and how to collect and analyze data, as well as effective ways to report results. All students are expected to undertake a research project.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC214 Research Methods in Sleep Research

Have you ever read an empirical research article and wondered where the authors got the idea for their research study? Have you ever thought about how researchers decide on which participants to select and what questions to ask of their study participants? How can we assess the value of a theoretical idea based on empirical evidence? And why might there be conflicting findings when researchers test the same phenomenon?

This course is designed to help students explore these and other questions related to research methods in psychology, with a focus on sleep research. This is an interactive lecture and lab-based course. Through a series of hands-on lab assignments, students will acquire the necessary skill set to be able to critique, analyze, and design psychological research. Students will explore both qualitative and quantitative methodological designs used in psychological research (e.g., experiments, interviews, and surveys). Additionally, students will gain skills in conducting basic statistical analyses (e.g., correlation, t-test, ANOVA). The course will culminate with a final project in which students will design an original research study.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC215 Research Methods: Behavioral Methods in Animal Research

This is a research methods course that provides an understanding of the different approaches to animal research, particularly those using rodent models. It provides students with an understanding of the different techniques employed by researchers and the questions they address. This course provides students with HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE WITH ANIMAL RESEARCH USING RODENT MODELS. Students will learn how to handle and inject rats and will also get a sense of how to design a behavioral experiment, including the use of control groups and counterbalancing. The course will follow a lecture/discussion/lab format where students will learn about different forms of conditioning (operant/classical) and how these apply to various behavioral tasks such as operant responding, autoshaping, decision-making, locomotion testing, etc. (see readings for more examples). One class each week will take place in the lab to provide students with hands-on experience with rats and the testing apparatuses. Students will be assigned a rat for the semester that they will use to collect and analyze data during lab classes. This will be combined with regular class discussion of research articles dealing with each topic, including some of the earlier reports and more recent applications. The focus of the course will be on trying to prepare students to design and carry out behavioral/animal research in a laboratory setting.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B215
Prereq: PSYC105 OR [NS&B213 or BIOL213 or PSYC240]

PSYC216 Research Methods in Diversity Science

This course introduces students to the research methods important to conducting scientific inquiry into topics related to inequality, oppression, and disparities in life outcomes across a broad range of experiences of marginalization (e.g., gender, race, sexuality, and the experiences at the intersections of these domains). In the process of introducing research methods pertinent to diversity science, we also discuss foundational and contemporary research in diversity science.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105 AND (PSYC200 OR PSYC201 OR QAC201 OR ECON300)

PSYC220 Cognitive Psychology

Cognitive psychology, a major branch in the field of psychology, is the scientific study of human adult mental processes. The goal of this course is to provide a broad introduction to the issues, methods, and phenomena that characterize the field. These will be brought to life with selected examples of influential empirical studies and, occasionally, practical applications. In seeking constraints on theories of how the mind works, we will draw primarily on studies of adult human behavior (e.g., reaction time, task accuracy), individuals with localized brain damage (e.g., visual agnosia), and measures of brain activity (e.g., as inferred using fMRI techniques). Computer models and nonhuman animal studies will also be considered. Broad topics will include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, reasoning, and decision making. The course is lecture-based but will incorporate discussions, demonstrations, video, and group activities.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B220
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC222 Sensation and Perception

This course explores our perceptual systems and how they create and shape our experience of the world around us. We will consider the neurophysiology of perceptual systems as well as psychological approaches to the study of perception, covering all of the human senses with a special emphasis on vision. Class demonstrations will introduce students to interesting perceptual phenomena.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B222
Prereq: PSYC105 OR [NS&B213 or BIOL213 or PSYC240]

PSYC225 Cognitive Neuroscience

This course provides an introduction to cognitive neuroscience--the study of how the brain enables the mind. We will begin with an overview of the neural substrates of cognition and the tools for understanding the structure and function of the human brain. Then we will cover neural processes that support sensory perception and attention, memory, motor control, language, executive control, and emotional and social functioning. We will also discuss mechanisms of brain evolution, development, and repair, and their implications for various diseases and disorders.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-NSB
Identical With: NS&B225
Prereq: PSYC105 OR [NS&B213 or BIOL213 or PSYC240]

PSYC226 Psychological Theories of Learning and Motivation

The goals of this course are to help students develop practical, evidence-based skills for effective classroom learning, understand and appreciate research on the neuroscience of learning and motivation across species, and apply theories of learning and motivation to understanding human behavior. Course objectives for achieving these goals include: implementing evidence-based practices; dispelling myths about learning; explaining mechanisms of memory consolidation and factors that modulate it; distinguishing between and identifying components of operant and classical conditioning; and explaining how each theory of motivation can be used to understand why people behave in certain ways.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B238
Prereq: PSYC105 OR NS&B213

PSYC227 Motivation and Reward

This course will focus on motivation and reward, providing students with a background in and understanding of the various theories and approaches to studying the topic of motivation, including an introduction to some of the history and the current advances in the field. The course uses animal and human research to try to unravel the brain areas and neurotransmitter systems involved in different forms of reward, including food, sex, and drugs, and examine cases of disordered motivation such as drug addiction, obesity, and disordered gambling.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-NSB
Identical With: NS&B227
Prereq: PSYC105 OR [NS&B213 or BIOL213 or PSYC240]

PSYC228 Clinical Neuropsychology

This introductory course will examine the relationship between brain functioning and cognition, behavior, and emotion through the study of human brain disorders. The course will begin with a brief overview of basic human regional neuroanatomy, followed by an exploration of neuropsychological assessment and intervention (its history, rationale, goals, and procedures). These topics will provide a foundation for the discussion of more specific topics in neuropsychology (e.g., traumatic brain injury, dementia, psychiatric disorders, cerebrovascular disorders, seizure disorders, learning disabilities, autism) and the role that neuropsychologists play in the evaluation and treatment of individuals with these disorders.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B228
Prereq: PSYC105 OR [NS&B213 or BIOL213 or PSYC240]

PSYC230 Developmental Psychology

This course is an introduction to human behavior and psychological development focusing on infancy and childhood. We will examine theory and research about physical, social, emotional, language, brain and cognitive development, with emphasis on cognitive development.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC230Z Developmental Psychology

Please note: readings and assignments will be due during winter break, prior to arriving on campus for Winter Session. Please visit the Winter Session website for the full syllabus -- http://www.wesleyan.edu/wintersession.

In this two-week, full-credit course, students will learn how children develop across different domains -- physical, cognitive, language, social-emotional, identity, personality. We will emphasize the primary research literature in developmental science and expose students to the fundamental methods and theories used to study how children develop. In the process, we will learn to appreciate the beauty and detail of human development, as well as the ingenuity of research in the field over the last several decades.

Please note that the course is broken up into two chunks with a week-long break in the middle. Students will have a writing assignment to work on during the break.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC239 Functional Anatomy of the Human Brain

A mass of tissue the consistency of firm jello and weighing about 2.5 pounds in the adult human, the brain is an organ that controls nearly every function of the body. It also enables the highest cognitive functions of humans such as learning and memory, thinking, consciousness, and aesthetic appreciation. Its malfunction results in a variety of diseases, including senility, mood disorders, and motor dysfunctions. This course will examine in some detail the complex organization of the brain and how it performs some of its basic functions. The course will be of special interest to premed students; NS&B, biology, and psychology majors; and anyone simply interested in how the brain works.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-BIOL
Identical With: NS&B239, BIOL239
Prereq: [NS&B213 or BIOL213 or PSYC240]

PSYC240 Behavioral Neurobiology

This course will introduce the concepts and contemporary research in the field of neuroscience and behavior. The course is intended for prospective neuroscience and behavior majors (for whom it is required) and for biology and psychology majors who wish a broad introduction to neuroscience. The initial few weeks will be devoted to fundamental concepts of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. Subsequent classes will deal in-depth with fundamental problems of nervous system function and the neural basis of behavior, including neurotransmitter systems; organization of the visual system and visual perception; the control of movement; neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders; the neuroendocrine system; control of autonomic behaviors such as feeding, sleep, and temperature regulation; the stress response; and language, learning, and memory. Experimental results from a variety of species, including humans, will be considered.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-NSB
Identical With: NS&B213, BIOL213
Prereq: None

PSYC245 Psychological Measurement

This course will discuss various approaches to the measurement of psychological constructs such as intelligence and personality. Topics covered will include ability tests (e.g., IQ tests), achievement tests (e.g., classroom assessments), and diagnostic clinical assessments (e.g., the draw-a-person test). Strengths and weaknesses associated with various methods of measurement (e.g., self-report vs. performance measures) will also be discussed. Special attention will be given to the criteria used to critically evaluate the psychometric quality of measurement instruments. Students will learn the steps necessary to develop psychometrically sound, practically useful, and legally defensible tests.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC246 Behavior Change, Clinical Interventions and Health Promotion

This class will review the current science and historical context of mental and physical health behavior change approaches across three levels of intervention: the self, the individual, and society. Major topics will include fundamental behavioral principles, basic elements of empirically supported individual treatments (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapies, interpersonal therapy), and the design and evaluation of population-level health interventions. Lectures, readings, and clinical examples will illustrate both the theory and step-by-step practice of evidence-based approaches to behavior change across levels. Assignments may include a self-monitoring exercise, in-class role plays, a group project, an exam, and brief writing assignments. This course is designed to introduce students to a broad range of contemporary approaches to psychological and behavioral treatments; however, it will not provide the skills needed to implement psychological interventions.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC248 Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood

This course takes a global, cultural perspective to the study of human development during adolescence (ages 10--18 years) and emerging adulthood (ages 18--25 years). Students will gain a deeper understanding of key aspects of psychosocial functioning during these two developmental age periods. The course approaches adolescence and emerging adulthood as periods of both opportunity and vulnerability. Topics include cognitive development, love and sexuality, media, peer relationships, and risk and resilience. Class activities and assignments provide opportunities for students to actively engage with the material presented and discussed in class. Students also will have the opportunity to participate in a cross-cultural experience, culminating in a class documentary on a selected topic related to adolescent and emerging adulthood development.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC249 Psychology of Sexual and Gender Diversity

There is a wide range of variability in sexuality and gender. This course reviews psychological research on the experiences of people with various sexualities, gender identities, and gender expressions, as well as how people come to develop beliefs about sexuality and gender.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC250 Personality

What does personality mean? Can you measure it? Who studies it and why? This course is designed to give a deeper understanding of these questions that psychologists interested in personality study, how they study these in a scientific manner, and how they use this knowledge to help others.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC251 Psychopathology

This course provides an overview of psychopathology, the study of "abnormal" behavior or mental disorders. From various theoretical perspectives, the ways that abnormality is defined will be considered. You will learn what we know and don't know about the phenomenology, diagnosis, and causes of mental disorders. Major domains of psychopathology, the symptoms and behaviors associated with common mental disorders, and the mechanisms hypothesized to be involved with them will be covered. The ways that different paradigms steer the development and implementation of treatments will be examined. This course is not designed to help resolve personal experiences with mental illness. This class will challenge widely accepted ideas about mental illness. You will learn to think critically about how mental illness is understood by society, mental health professionals, and clinical researchers.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC253 Educational Psychology

This course will focus on three major topics and how they relate to current educational policy debates. The first topic will be an examination of the fundamental purpose of school. We will discuss theoretical and empirical perspectives on why schools exist and ways in which school purpose varies by school type (e.g., public, private, charter) and location (e.g., by state and country). The second topic to be covered relates to the implementation of school mission. In this context, we will reflect on how theories of child development, student motivation, classroom management, and pedagogy inform instructional practice. Finally, the third major topic that will be covered is how to determine whether schools are achieving their stated goals. We will examine the appropriate (and inappropriate) uses of assessment for understanding whether students are learning, whether teachers are effective, and whether a school has a positive or negative climate.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: EDST253
Prereq: None

PSYC259 Discovering the Person

This course surveys major developments in psychology and psychiatry from 1860 to 1980. Through readings and lectures, the course introduces the major schools, theories, and systems in the American "psy" sciences. We examine the kinds of persons who were "discovered," the techniques of discovery, the extensions of psychological ideas to institutions and policy formulations, and the consequences of these discoveries for public as well as private life. We examine psychological phenomena that were located, catalogued, and explained by these sciences, including irrationality, sexuality, cognitive powers, personality, emotional processes, neurotic behaviors, intelligence, addictive tendencies, and the will. Attention is also given to the scientific grounds for investigating persons, the empirical evidence sought in the century-long process of discovering and naming psychological kinds, and the modes of producing this knowledge (aggregate methods, case study, and theories). Readings include primary source documents, histories of the disciplines, and philosophical analyses.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: AMST259, SISP259
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC260 Social Psychology

What leads us to become attracted to one person rather than another? How does prejudice develop, and how can it be reduced? Can psychological research help protect the environment and, if so, how? This course offers an overview of classic and contemporary social psychology, covering topics such as group behavior, friendship, stereotyping, conformity, obedience, and conflict resolution.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC261 Cultural Psychology

Through essays, novels, videos, and film, we will explore the intersection of culture, ideology, and psychology. We will examine how gender, ethnicity, and class are interwoven in the social fabric and individual identity. Employing feminist, psychoanalytic, and deconstructive interpretive methods, we will try to decipher the many ways we inscribe ourselves in culture.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC265 Culture in Psychology: An Introduction to Theory and Research

Culture is central to the study of mind and behavior. This course will provide students with an introduction to theory and research on culture in psychology. We will discuss what culture is, the methods that psychologists use to study culture, and how much of our behavior is universal or culture-specific. We will explore how culture influences how we think, feel, and behave.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC266 Psychology of Communities: Identity, Activism, and Social Engagement

This course serves as an introduction to community psychology. Students will read about, research, and discuss major topics in the field, including the ecological framework, diversity paradigms, social change, and empowerment.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC267 Global Mental Health

During the past half-century, mental health professionals have increasingly explored the international reach and cross-cultural relevance of their work. Practitioners have traveled from country to country in order to work with local populations, including those experiencing traumatic circumstances such as war and natural disasters. Professional organizations such as the American Psychological Association have developed guidelines and recommendations for multicultural competence. Researchers have investigated the cross-cultural epidemiology and expression of mental health challenges; for example, according to the World Health Organization, one in four people across the globe will experience a mental disorder at some point in their lives.

What does it mean to establish the global prevalence of mental disorders? Is psychological distress, including the distress that results from traumatic exposure, experienced and interpreted in the same way in all cultural contexts? While some scholars have argued that mental disorders are a global epidemic requiring a uniform, universal response, others have suggested that the exportation of psychological discourse and approaches from Western countries has eclipsed local expressions of distress and indigenous healing traditions. This course will explore these questions and controversies using the tools and frameworks of multicultural psychology. We will place particular emphasis on the social, cultural, structural, and environmental determinants of mental health. We will address mental health disparities between high- and low-income countries, as well as the meanings of psychiatric explanatory models in advantaged and disadvantaged communities. Populations of focus will include migrants, refugees, internally displaced persons, and the urban homeless. Throughout the course, we will explore the growing research in the field of indigenous psychology, which promotes local knowledge, as well as the structural competency movement, which emphasizes the socio-institutional origins of health disparities.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC271 Life-Span Development

This course summarizes classic and current theory and research on human development, highlighting the life-span perspective on development and the interacting contributions of biology and environment. Commonalities and differences among ethnic groups and cultures are considered, as are the broader social contexts within which individuals develop. Implications for educational practices and social policy are also discussed.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC277 Psychology and the Law

This course will offer an introduction to the range of topics that are of concern both to psychologists and to members of the legal profession. We will investigate how psychologists may enter the legal arena as social scientists, consultants, and expert witnesses, as well as how the theory, data, and methods of the social sciences can enhance and contribute to our understanding of the judicial system. We will focus on what social psychology can offer the legal system in terms of its research and expertise with an examination of the state of the social science research on topics such as juries and decision making, eyewitness testimony, mental illness, the nature of voluntary confession, competency/insanity, child testimony, repressed memory, and sentencing guidelines. In addition, this course will look at the new and exciting ways legal scholars and psychologists/social scientists are now collaborating on research that looks at topics such as the role of education in prison, cultural definitions of responsibility, media accounts and social representations of crime and criminals, death penalty mitigation, and gender/race discrimination within the criminal justice system. This course will introduce students to this field, especially to the growing body of applied and theoretical work and resources available for study and review. Students will be encouraged to explore the connections between issues of social science and the law, translating legal issues into social scientific research questions that can then be examined more closely in the literature.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: AFAM287
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC280 Applied Data Analysis

In this project-based course, you will have the opportunity to answer questions that you feel passionately about through independent research based on existing data. You will develop skills in generating testable hypotheses, conducting a literature review, preparing data for analysis, conducting descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, and presenting research findings. The course offers one-on-one support, ample opportunities to work with other students, and training in the skills required to complete a project of your own design. These skills will prepare you to work in many different research labs across the University that collect empirical data. It is also an opportunity to fulfill an important requirement in several different majors.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-QAC, SBS-QAC
Identical With: QAC201, GOVT201, NS&B280
Prereq: None

PSYC280Z Applied Data Analysis

In this project-based course, you will have the opportunity to answer questions that you feel passionately about through independent research based on existing data. You will develop skills in generating testable hypotheses, conducting a literature review, preparing data for analysis, conducting descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, and presenting research findings. The course offers one-on-one support, ample opportunities to work with other students, and training in the skills required to complete a project of your own design. These skills will prepare you to work in many different research labs across the University that collect empirical data. It is also an opportunity to fulfill an important requirement in several different majors.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-QAC, SBS-QAC
Identical With: QAC201Z, GOVT201Z, NS&B280Z
Prereq: None

PSYC288Z Zero to Infinity: The Psychology of Numbers

What are the origins of mathematical thinking, and why do some people become experts while others get nervous calculating a tip? Before children are ever taught formal mathematics in a classroom, they are confronted with situations where they must use their intuitive understanding of numbers, geometry, and space to successfully navigate their environments. Yet, individual differences in math achievement emerge early in development and often persist throughout children's education. In this course we read and discuss both foundational and cutting-edge articles from cognitive science, education, and psychology to understand how mathematical thinking develops. We will also tackle questions such as: How do culture and varying social contexts affect numerical understanding? What do we know about gender differences in math achievement? How do stereotypes, prejudice, and math anxiety affect math performance? This class will involve a blend of synchronous class-time meetings and asynchronous work.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Identical With: EDST250Z
Prereq: None

PSYC291 Language and Thought

This course provides a close examination on the relationship between language and thought, a central question in cognitive science and a very active area of research and theory in recent years. Students will be exposed to theoretical and empirical work evaluating several prominent hypotheses about language and thought, including the hypothesis that the language you speak influences or even determines the thoughts you can think. The case studies to be evaluated will include object kinds, number, spatial relations, time, gender, theory of mind, and causality.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC295Z The Science of Happiness

(This course is being offered as a blend of synchronous class meetings and asynchronous work involving small group discussions.) Positive psychology is the study of human happiness. The field has compiled an enormous research base offering evidence of the fundamental components of well-being and flourishing. While former work used a narrow, Western definition of happiness, the discipline later broadened its focus to include traditionally Eastern concepts such as social harmony and compassion. More recently, the field has been redefined through second-wave and third-wave positive psychologies, both of which seek to break free from the binary concepts of "positive" and "negative" in favor of a dialectic approach, while utilizing concepts of flourishing through suffering found in indigenous psychology, and including models for systemic change found in social work, sociology, and economics.

This course will trace the history and development of positive psychology from its inception to the current state of the field, using a positive psychology text supplemented by journal articles. Core concepts will be discussed and critiqued. It will require students to keep "happiness journals" and complete out-of-class activities for personal reflection upon and practice of individual experiences of happiness. Additional course requirements include shorter and longer reflection papers, in-class discussion, and a final project.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC311 Children's Learning from Media

Children are surrounded by media that aim to teach them, from television shows that introduce Spanish, to books that promote kindness, to apps that explain the biological world. How do children learn from the wide range of educational media they encounter? In what ways do media set the stage for children's expectations about the world? And does our modern, digital era suggest a shift in children's education? In this course, we will explore theoretical questions and empirical research to better understand how children learn from media and how different forms of media affect cognition and behavior. We will focus primarily on infancy and early childhood as periods of tremendous growth and increasing exposure to media, but will also discuss media use during middle childhood and adolescence. We will consider topics that have been well-studied and important questions that remain unanswered in the field. We will also turn a critical eye to the historical lack of representation (i.e., race, gender, disability, sexual orientation, family structure, etc.) in children's media and discuss necessary changes. Throughout the course, we will engage critically with empirical research, develop ideas for testing unanswered questions, and practice communicating about research to the public.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC312 Family Transitions Across the Life Span

This seminar aims to provide an overview of normative and non-normative family transitions from adolescence through adulthood. Grounded in a life-course perspective, this course examines theories and recent findings related to family transitions. Topics include "modern" dating, relationship formation and dissolution, staying single, parenthood and remaining "child-free," family structure changes such as marriage, divorce, remarriage, and widowhood, as well as grandparenting, empty nesting (and refilling), and the "sandwich generation." From this course, students will learn developmental theories related to transitions across the life course, and be able to critically analyze recent research on family transitions.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC316 Schizophrenia and Its Treatment: Neuroscientific, Historical, and Phenomenological Perspectives

The goal of this seminar will be to critically investigate the concept of schizophrenia as a unitary disease construct, from historical, neuroscientific, and phenomenological approaches, and the implications of these views for our understanding of treatment of the disorder. How are we to make sense of a psychiatric disorder that has changed so substantially in definition over time, with wide interindividual difference in symptom expression and functional outcome, a wide array of competing theories regarding etiology and biological mechanisms, and correspondingly diverse treatment interventions? We will engage these questions through three separate units that will evaluate the disorder from three different levels of analysis: (1) readings in the history of psychiatry and the perspective they cast on schizophrenia as a unitary disease concept; (2) an analysis of contemporary work in neuroimaging and experimental cognition in the disease and the current status of creating a coherent account of neurocognitive mechanisms of the disease, as well as a neurocognitive approach to novel interventions; and (3) new work on understanding the experience of the disease from first-person accounts and the systematic analysis of these accounts as a window to understanding heterogeneity in the disease and novel approaches for therapy.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B316
Prereq: None

PSYC316Z Schizophrenia and its Treatment

Please note: readings and assignments will be due during winter break, prior to arriving on campus for Winter Session. Please visit the Winter Session website for the full syllabus - http://www.wesleyan.edu/wintersession.

The goal of the seminar will be to critically investigate the concept of schizophrenia as a unitary disease construct, from historical, neuroscientific, and phenomenological approaches, and the implications of these views for our understanding of treatment in the disorder. How are we to make sense of a psychiatric disorder that has changed so substantially in definition over time, with wide interindividual difference in symptom expression and functional outcome, a wide array of competing theories regarding etiology and biological mechanisms, and correspondingly diverse treatment interventions? We will engage these questions through three separate units that will evaluate the disorder from three different levels of analysis: (1) readings in the history of psychiatry and the perspective they cast on schizophrenia as a unitary disease concept; (2) an analysis of contemporary work in neuroimaging and experimental cognition in the disease and the current status of creating a coherent account of neurocognitive mechanisms of the disease, as well as a neurocognitive approach to novel interventions; (3) new work on understanding the experience of the disease from first-person accounts and the systematic analysis of these accounts as a window to understanding heterogeneity in the disease and novel approaches for therapy.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B316Z
Prereq: None

PSYC317 Seminar in Adoption & Culture

This seminar uses psychology theory and research, as well as interdisciplinary scholarship from across the social sciences and humanities, to critically examine the psychological experience of being adopted. We will examine the nature and experiences of adoption, including international, domestic, transracial, and same-race adoptions. We will draw on critical scholarship that highlights systems of power and questions the established "truths" of adoption (e.g., adoption as saving an orphan). Further, we will examine the ways in which belonging to a minoritized culture, race, or ethnicity impacts the ways in which individuals experience adoption. Example topics include adjustment, birth family, identity, migration, and well-being.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC318 Culture and Subjectivity

The critical psychologist Thomas Teo states, "society, culture, and history provide forms (molds) of subjectivity, whereby (developing) individuals have the agency to sometimes choose, expand or change forms, and in rare circumstances, they may even be able to transcend these forms. Under normal circumstances, however, humans adapt, (ful)fill, and actively 'suture' into these forms, allowing for variations and new actualizations." This course is oriented towards exploring contemporary forms of subjectivity in the 21st century, considering in particular the combination of social media and neoliberal capitalism in the shaping of mentalities and behaviors, as well as possible avenues to critically and creatively contest these predominant cultural forms.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC322 Psychology of Decision Making

We make decisions all the time. The vast majority of decisions have little consequence, though some are monumental and can deeply affect our lives. The broad goal of this course is to explore the science of judgment and decision making from a cognitive psychological perspective. This means that we will consider how the study of mental processes can inform us about how an individual person's judgments and decisions are made, characteristic patterns and biases of decision making, factors that influence decision making, and whether decision making can be improved. Themes include: What does it mean to be rational, and are humans rational decision makers? How do basic cognitive systems and their interplay underlie more complex decision behavior? What role do affect and emotion play in decision making? How can we move productively between neurobiology, cognition, and social application in thinking about the cognitive psychology of decision making? Do individuals and societies need help in improving decision making, and if so, what kind of help? Overarching goals are to understand the major questions and frameworks that have guided decision research from this perspective, to explore recent empirical studies with an eye toward how they challenge or extend past views, and to generate new research ideas, connections to other disciplines, and practical applications. Foundations of Contemporary Psychology (PSYC 105) and Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 220) are strongly recommended as prerequisites, as this is an upper-level course (that relies on student contributions) in the Psychology Department.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC324 Culture and Denial

Intensive research on cultural illusion using interpretive methods will be done. Books and movies about women escaping patriarchy will be our primary focus.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC261

PSYC325 Healthy Places: Practice, Policy, and Population Health

The built environment influences many aspects of health and well-being: psychological stressors (crime, noise, and violence), what people eat, the water they drink, the air they breathe, where (or if) they work, the housing that shelters them, where they go for health care, what social networks are available for support, and how political power is distributed and public resources allocated. How cities, suburbs, and rural areas are managed; local policy; and planning and design decisions can all help determine whether the places we live will be threats to public health and, perhaps more important, to an aging society. The focus of this course connects the fields of planning, psychology, and public health to explore contemporary challenges (and innovations) in the 21st-century built environment. Students will explore the multiple forces that impact population health, how to analyze these determinants, and what roles planning and public health agencies, as well as other institutions such as local governments, civil society, the private sector, and communities themselves, can play in research and action aimed at improving physical and mental health.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: ENVS325
Prereq: None

PSYC327 Psychology of Conflict Resolution

This course will focus on the psychological causes and consequences of interpersonal, intergroup, and international conflict. Topics discussed will include such issues as the role of power, status, trust, and social identity. Students will learn about various theories related to the causes of conflict, as well as practical techniques for navigating conflict, including negotiation, mediation, and facilitation. Educational programs that teach conflict-resolution skills will also be examined.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC328 Current Research in Early Childhood

Early childhood is widely seen as a time when the environment exerts particularly strong influences on individuals, with large effects on children's risk or resilience for healthy developmental outcomes. Research in this area provides a way to consider and evaluate claims about this developmental period. What knowledge does society need about this period to promote healthy development for all children? Where do children learn social skills? Why do children play with some toys but not others? How does timing affect the impact of early interventions? What foundational skills help all children learn to read? By what mechanisms does economic poverty affect development?

This advanced seminar will explore current research in early childhood. We will focus on the period from birth to five years, drawing on empirical work in developmental psychology, cognitive science, and education to discuss major topics and debates. These include cognitive and academic foundations for later schooling; emotional development and social skills; social identity and sense of self; self-regulation and executive functions; play; adverse factors in development; risk, resilience, and vulnerability; culture, socioeconomic status, and poverty; developmental neuroscience; early childhood education; and public policy. Guest visits by experts in some of the areas will complement our readings and discussions.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC329 Neural Costs of War

This course focuses on stress reactions that result because of exposure to war, combat, and related atrocities. You will learn about the diagnosis of PTSD, including its development and history. There is a strong emphasis on the neural and cognitive mechanisms for stress-related psychopathology and the overlap of psychological and neural systems with the damaging effects of traumatic brain injury. While interactions of these mechanisms with social and cultural processes are considered, the primary emphasis is on the neural and cognitive mechanisms. To be fully prepared for this course, students should have a solid grounding in neuroscience and behavior, as well as basic psychopathology.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B329
Prereq: None

PSYC332 Seminar in Cognitive Neuroscience

This seminar is an in-depth analysis of the ways that scientists study the neural basis of cognition in humans. Topics to be covered include the representation of visual categories, the neural influence of attention, episodic memory, theories of spatial cognition, and decision-making. Through reading and discussion of primary research articles, we will evaluate the methods and theoretical debates in each domain, while recognizing and integrating common themes that link across the field. Students will also learn how to work with simple computer models and simulations (using Python), in order to gain a strong foundation in the computational principles that underlie recent advances in the field of cognitive neuroscience.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC338 Masculinities

This course examines masculinities and the psychology of men using theories and research findings. We survey a range of perspectives on men and masculinity, drawing from evolutionary theory, cognitive psychology, psychoanalysis, social psychology, and queer theory. We will ask how the psychological attributes associated with men relate to private life and public spaces, and whether our enactments and conceptions of masculinity have changed over time. Exploration of these questions will be informed by both psychological research and close analysis of media representations; the course thus emphasizes methods for examining representations of masculinity in science and the media.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: FGSS338, SISP338
Prereq: PSYC105 OR [FGSS209 or ENGL208]

PSYC341 Psychology of Human Memory

This seminar course is designed to provide students with an in-depth exploration of the psychological science of human memory. We will examine current issues and theories in human memory research and the methods by which human memory is explored. Both classic and contemporary research findings from the disciplines of cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and neuropsychology will be brought together to paint a picture of the current understanding of human memory. Topics to be covered include different memory systems and frameworks (e.g., working memory, semantic memory, episodic memory), remembering and forgetting (e.g., phenomenal experience of remembering, various mechanisms of forgetting), reality/source monitoring (e.g., memory attributions, true and false memories), the influence of emotional and social factors on memory (e.g., social remembering), and memory in clinical populations.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B341
Prereq: None

PSYC343 Sleep and Psychosocial Functioning in Youth

Have you ever wondered whether it's worthwhile to pull an all-nighter in hopes of improving your grades on an exam the next day? Have you ever noticed that you snack more when you're having trouble sleeping? And why is it that some individuals seem to have the most energy late at night, while others are most alert early in the morning? This course is designed to orient students to the fascinating world of sleep and psychosocial functioning. We will briefly explore the architecture of sleep and analyze theoretical explanations for the functions of sleep. The bulk of the course will focus on examining predictors and consequences of ("normal") sleep in relation to various aspects of psychosocial functioning, including mental health, interpersonal relationships, technology use, cognitive functioning, and chronotype. We will examine these associations specifically within the context of late childhood, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. As part of this course, you will have the opportunity to track your own sleep via an objective sleep monitor and keep a sleep diary for part of the course.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC347 Science of Suicide Risk & Prevention

This course will explore the science of suicide research, prevention, and intervention. Topics will include terminology, epidemiology, historical and contemporary theories of suicide, ethical and methodological challenges to suicide research, risk and protective factors, empirically supported approaches to prevention and intervention, suicide in the media and popular culture, and emerging issues and controversies in the field of suicidology. In many ways, the field of suicide research is young and knowledge is rapidly changing. Special attention will be paid to novel methodological advances in clinical psychological science. The course will use books, empirical articles, class discussion, critical thinking, exams, and writing assignments to accomplish its learning objectives. This course is not designed to resolve personal experiences with suicidal thoughts, suicide loss, or mental illness nor will it address assessing suicide risk among friends or family members.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC348 Origins of Knowledge

In this course we will discuss in depth a selection of current topics in cognitive development, centering on questions concerning the origins of knowledge. (What kinds of knowledge do we possess even very early in life? How does that knowledge change over time?) We will examine these questions within specific subject areas such as object perception, space perception, number understanding, and understanding of other minds, surveying evidence from different stages of human individual development as well as evidence from nonhuman species.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B348
Prereq: None

PSYC349 Introduction to Madness Studies

What does it mean to be "mad"? Are all mad people mentally ill? In recent years, just as clinical psychologists and psychiatrists have honed their technico-scientific infrastructures for studying and classifying psychopathology, a nascent academic discipline called "madness studies" has emerged. Madness studies aims to interrogate and diversify discourse about unusual, extreme, and distressing mental states, as well as to reclaim languages about madness that are viewed as inappropriate and stigmatizing. This course explores the recent history of madness studies as an academic discipline, charting its relationship to historical shifts in mental health research and practice, as well as to related interdisciplinary arenas such as disability studies, liberation psychology, and the philosophy of psychiatry. We examine the rise of consumer, survivor, and ex-patient (C/S/X) movements, exploring differences among those who identify as having mad pride and mental illness. With particular focus on first-person accounts of lived experience, readings cover issues of epistemic and social justice in mental health discourse. Throughout the course, students attend to pluralistic ways of understanding and studying madness, including biopsychiatric, psychosocial, spiritual, and indigenous approaches.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC352 Applied Social Psychology

In this course you will learn about how social psychology theory is used in "real world" applications. Topics include application of social psychology to social problems, application to practical problems in groups and organizations, and how to design and evaluate a social psychological intervention.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC353 Neurobiology of Neurological Disorders

This course aims to provide a foundation in the underlying mechanisms of neurological and psychiatric disorders. We will explore through lectures and readings of primary literature a number of important neurological and psychiatric diseases, including including schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, sleep disorders, anxiety disorders, and Parkinson's disease. This course focuses on the fundamental molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie neurological disorders and is designed to engage students who wish to study basic aspects of brain function.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-NSB
Identical With: NS&B353, BIOL353
Prereq: [NS&B213 or BIOL213 or PSYC240]

PSYC355 Psychology of Reading

The study of the psychology of reading encompasses many aspects of human cognition: from sensation and perception to comprehension and reasoning. This class will provide an overview of research in the psychology of reading. Topics such as word recognition, eye movements during reading, comprehension, learning to read, methods of teaching reading, the brain and reading, reading in different languages, and reading impairments in children and adults will be covered.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC356 Neurodevelopmental Disorders

This course aims to provide a foundation in the underlying mechanisms of neurodevelopmental disorders. We will explore through lectures and readings of primary literature a number of important neurological and psychiatric diseases, including genetic disorders such as Down syndrome, Fragile X, and Williams syndrome; spectrum disorders such as autism and fetal alcohol syndrome; ADHD, Tourettes, cerebral palsy, and some motor disorders including developmental coordination disorder, stereotypic movement disorder, sensory ingration disorder, and neonatal hypoxia. This course focuses on the fundamental molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie neurological disorders and is designed to engage students who wish to study basic cellular aspects of brain function.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-NSB
Identical With: NS&B356, BIOL356
Prereq: [NS&B213 or BIOL213 or PSYC240]

PSYC359 Making the Psychological: Discovering, Manufacturing, Circulating

Psychology aims to explain human experiences and thoughts, including unconscious ones. Using scientific methods, psychology produces valid representations of human nature, names them, and circulates that knowledge for both its truth value and usefulness to society and individuals. Despite much success in these aims, the validity of much of psychology's knowledge is in being challenged - as evidenced in recent concerns about the reproducibility of experiments. We will examine the epistemic grounds of psychology's truth claims and consider alternative models that understand the truth claims to be enactments, constructions, or ideologies that rehearse cultural beliefs. Case studies of science-based knowledge eventually found to be inaccurate or exaggerated (priming research; the power pose) are used to examine how some truth claims are generated and challenged, and cases of robust research are used to explore how some truth claims acquire credibility inside and outside the laboratory. We ask, too, how these claims travel to be taken up as new ways for individuals to experience the self and social world, and examine the public's and our own aspirations to expand consciousness and act otherwise. Students will develop case studies of psychological knowledge, its validation, circulation, and effects in the world.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM359, SISP360
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC361 The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination

This seminar offers a social psychological analysis of different forms of prejudice and discrimination, including racism, sexism, anti-Semitism, heterosexism, and less recognized forms of bias, such as the exploitation and control of indigenous peoples, animals, and the natural environment.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: AFAM361
Prereq: PSYC260

PSYC363 The Dramaturgical Approach to Psychology

The objective of this course is to explore the use of the language of theater in the illumination of psychological questions. Material for the course will be about half drama, half readings from social psychology. Among the issues to be explored are politics as theater, audience effects, role-playing as a teaching and therapeutic technique, the actor's identity problems, and general theory of the mask.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC365 Seminar on Emotion

This seminar aims to provide an intensive introduction to what emotions are and how they influence our relations with other people. The seminar will cover general theory on emotion as well as theory on specific emotions (e.g., anger, shame, envy, humiliation). As emotions are multicomponential processes, we will examine how the social context shapes different components of the emotion process (e.g., phenomenological experience, regulation, and expression of emotion). Moreover, we will explore how emotions operate at the individual, interpersonal, intergroup, and cultural levels of analysis.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC200 OR QAC201 OR ECON300

PSYC370 Advanced Psychology Seminar for Thesis Writers

This is an advanced seminar course for students completing a thesis (Senior Honors or BA/MA) in a psychology lab or related research discipline. The course will allow students an opportunity to develop skills that are relevant for thesis writers. A specific focus of the course will be on developing research presentation skills. This course will also provide students an opportunity to practice how to effectively discuss their thesis topic with a broader audience.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: PSYC570
Prereq: None

PSYC376 Advanced Research in Adolescent Racial Identity and Resistance

Students in this advanced research course will contribute to ongoing research studies in the area of adolescent ethnic-racial identity and sociopolitical development. Students will be introduced to community- and school-based research methods with marginalized youth and families. Students will contribute to different aspects of the research such as literature reviews, collecting and analyzing qualitative and/or quantitative data, data management, and manuscript preparation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC378 Advanced Research in Cognitive Neuroscience

This advanced research course provides in-depth training in the experimental methods of cognitive neuroscience, focused on human memory. Students will work individually and in groups on semester-long projects, which will include literature reviews, experimental design, data collection, analysis, journal-formatted writing of results, and oral presentations.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B378
Prereq: None

PSYC379 Advanced Research in Conceptual Development

Students in this course work on new and ongoing research projects in the Cognitive Development Laboratory. Students will be individually matched to a research project and participate in all aspects of research including background literature review and designing, running, and analyzing experiments.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC382 Advanced Research in Decision Making

This course is designed to allow students to conduct supervised research in the area of the cognitive psychology of reasoning and decision making. Working as a team with the instructor and other members of the research group, students will undertake a semester-long experimental research project on a topic in reasoning and decision making.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B382
Prereq: None

PSYC383 Advanced Research in Learning and Memory

This advanced research course is designed to allow students to conduct supervised research in the area of human learning and memory. Students will become familiar with both classic and contemporary studies in memory and undertake a semester-long experimental research project that seeks to answer a current question in the field of memory research either individually or as a group. Students will get to work on all aspects of the research project, including reviews of the background literature; generation of research ideas; the design, conduct, and analysis of a study; and a write-up of research findings in a journal-article format.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B383
Prereq: None

PSYC384 Advanced Research in Cognitive Development

This course is designed to allow advanced students to conduct a supervised group research project in cognitive development. Working with the instructor, students will conduct an experiment that seeks to answer a current question in the field of cognitive development.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC386 Advanced Research in Sleep

This advanced research course is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of how to critique and analyze psychological research. Specifically, we will focus on research within the field of sleep and psychosocial functioning. This seminar course takes an intensive lab-based approach. Students will have access to a comprehensive dataset that includes assessments of stress, anxiety, depression, physical activity, interpersonal relationship quality, personality, procrastination, and chronotype. Based on this data, students will be expected to commit to a semester-long project, which involves analyzing data and reporting findings on a self-selected topic. Upon completion of this course, students will have a strong working knowledge of the field of sleep and psychosocial functioning. This course also provides opportunities for students to develop analytical, writing, critical thinking, and presentation skills. Students also will gain data analytic skills using the Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS) program.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: (PSYC105 AND PSYC200)

PSYC387 Advanced Research in Community Psychology

This course is an advanced research special-topics seminar that will provide individualized training in research, managing data, and various statistical methods.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC388 Advanced Research in Measurement

In this advanced seminar on psychological measurement, students will receive individualized mentoring from the instructor on each aspect of the course, including conducting an in-depth literature review on a topic, developing a new measurement instrument, gathering and analyzing pilot data using a variety of advanced statistical methods (e.g., factor analysis, Rasch measurement, item response theory), and writing a professional paper reporting on the results and future directions.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC105

PSYC390 Experimental Investigations into Reading

Experienced readers can easily recognize thousands of words. The mental dictionaries of these readers are efficiently organized to allow rapid and seemingly effortless word recognition. There are still many unanswered questions about the processes involved in visual word recognition. In this class, students will work together with the instructor to design and carry out an experimental investigation relating to reading and word recognition. The semester will provide students with a chance to integrate all aspects of the experimental process: idea formation, experimental design, data collection and analysis, interpretation, write-up, and presentation.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B390
Prereq: None

PSYC391 Advanced Research in Cultural Phenomenology

This seminar is designed for seniors doing theses in cultural psychology to share their ideas and for juniors who are thinking about a thesis to explore various research directions.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC261

PSYC392 Behavioral Methods in Affective Neuroscience

This research methods course teaches experimental design and methods in experimental psychopathology using tools to conduct behavioral research in cognitive-affective neuroscience. Course material includes studies from the contemporary psychopathology research literature, with a focus on cognition-emotion interactions. Methods taught will vary by semester and individual research projects and will include statistical procedures (e.g., repeated measures ANOVA), tools for conducting research and analyzing data (e.g., computer programming for stimuli presentation and data processing), and neuroimaging techniques (e.g., event-related potential). There is high expectation that those enrolled in this course will take initiative to extend their learning to areas for which they have specific interests related to the course objectives. Students are also expected to work independently.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B392
Prereq: None

PSYC393 Advanced Research in Cognition and Neuropsychiatric Illness

Students in this advanced undergraduate research course will work in teams on novel and ongoing research studies focused on understanding neurocognitive dysfunction and its treatment in neuropsychiatric illness. Students will be matched to a research project and will participate in different aspects of this research including background literature review, acquiring elementary skills in neurocognitive and symptom assessment, and collecting and/or analyzing extant data using SPSS. Students may also be involved in learning cognitive training procedures.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B393
Prereq: None

PSYC396 Advanced Research on Culture and Emotion

This course offers an in-depth examination of how culture (e.g., cultural values, norms) influences the emergence, experience, expression, and social consequences of emotions. Students will work in a team on a semester-long research project on culture and emotion (e.g., envy, humiliation, shame, happiness). The course includes advanced theoretical and empirical literature. The readings and research projects will give special attention to how gender intersects with culture in emotional experience and expression. Students will also learn how to adapt methods (e.g., narrative approaches, diary studies, field experiments) and techniques (e.g., adjustment of research measures to specific cultural communities, translation) to study emotions in their cultural context.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: PSYC265 OR PSYC208 OR PSYC365 OR PSYC200 OR QAC201 OR ECON300

PSYC397 Advanced Research in Clinical Psychology

This advanced research course provides students the opportunity to conduct supervised research in clinical psychology, specifically in the area of suicide and self-injurious behaviors. Depending on the semester and student interests, tasks may include study design, data collection, clinical interviewing, data management, data analysis, and manuscript preparation. Weekly lab meetings will focus on current topics in clinical research and will include student presentations. All students will complete a research paper in journal article format. It is expected that those enrolled in this course will work independently and take initiative to extend their learning in the areas most consistent with their interests.

Note: This course is not designed to resolve personal experiences with suicidal thoughts, suicide loss, or mental illness, nor will it address assessing suicide risk among friends or family members.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Prereq: None

PSYC399 Advanced Research in Gambling, Drugs, and Junk Food

This advanced laboratory course provides in-depth training in the experimental methods of behavioral neuroscience of motivation and reward and provides students with hands-on experience with animal research using rodent models. The capstone of the course gives students the opportunity to carry out an independent group animal research project in the lab, which may require a slightly heavier time commitment for the duration of the experiment (typically around two weeks). Students will learn how to handle rats in a behavioral neuroscience research setting and how to design and carry out an experiment to measure reward and motivation using diverse apparatuses such as operant (Skinner) boxes or conditioned place preference chambers. Research typically focuses on rodent models of gambling, diet-induced obesity, and drug addiction. The course also focuses on strengthening students' scientific writing and oral presentation skills.

In addition, the course contains a service learning component in which students will work to develop a brief presentation/talk on a topic related to gambling, eating disorders, or drug addiction. Students will practice their talk in class with the aim of presenting it to local middle and high school students, in order to provide more information and education about these topics and the state of current research surrounding them.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.25
Gen Ed Area: NSM-PSYC
Identical With: NS&B399
Prereq: None

PSYC401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

PSYC408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

PSYC409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC419 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

PSYC420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

PSYC420A Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U

PSYC421 Undergraduate Research, Science

Individual research projects for undergraduate students supervised by faculty members.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC422 Undergraduate Research, Science

Individual research projects for undergraduate students supervised by faculty members.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC423 Advanced Research Seminar, Undergraduate

Advanced research tutorial; project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC424 Advanced Research Seminar, Undergraduate

Advanced research tutorial; project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC465 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC466 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC467 Independent Study, Undergraduate

Credit may be earned for an independent study during a summer or authorized leave of absence provided that (1) plans have been approved in advance, and (2) all specified requirements have been satisfied.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC468 Independent Study, Undergraduate

Credit may be earned for an independent study during a summer or authorized leave of absence provided that (1) plans have been approved in advance, and (2) all specified requirements have been satisfied.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC470 Independent Study, Undergradua

Credit may be earned for an independent study during a summer or authorized leave of absence provided that (1) plans have been approved in advance, and (2) all specified requirements have been satisfied.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

PSYC491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC496 Research Apprentice, Undergraduate

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

PSYC500 Graduate Pedagogy

The elements of good teaching will be discussed and demonstrated through lectures, practice teaching sessions, and discussions of problems encountered in the actual teaching environment. The staff consists of faculty and experienced graduate students. An integral part of the course is a required one-day workshop BEFORE the first day of formal classes.

Training in pedagogy in the first semester of attendance is required for all incoming Wesleyan MA and PhD students who have not already fulfilled this requirement at Wesleyan. BA/MA students are not required to get training in pedagogy but may choose to do so.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: None
Identical With: E&ES500, CHEM500, BIOL500, ASTR500, MB&B500, MUSC500, PHYS500, MATH500
Prereq: None

PSYC501 Individual Tutorial, Graduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC502 Individual Tutorial, Graduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC503 Selected Topics, Graduate Sciences

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. A seminar primarily concerned with papers taken from current research publications designed for, and required of, graduate students.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC504 Selected Topics, Graduate Sciences

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. A seminar primarily concerned with papers taken from current research publications designed for, and required of, graduate students.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC511 Group Tutorial, Graduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC512 Group Tutorial, Graduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC549 Advanced Research Seminar, Graduate

Advanced research tutorial; project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC550 Advanced Research Seminar, Graduate

Advanced research tutorial; project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC561 Graduate Field Research

Research in the field, normally on thesis project.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

PSYC562 Graduate Field Research

Research in the field, normally on thesis project.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

PSYC570 Advanced Psychology Seminar for Thesis Writers

This is an advanced seminar course for students completing a thesis (Senior Honors or BA/MA) in a psychology lab or related research discipline. The course will allow students an opportunity to develop skills that are relevant for thesis writers. A specific focus of the course will be on developing research presentation skills. This course will also provide students an opportunity to practice how to effectively discuss their thesis topic with a broader audience.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: PSYC370
Prereq: None

PSYC590 Advanced Research, BA/MA

Intensive investigation of special research problems leading to a BA/MA thesis.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT