Italian (ITAL)

ITAL101 Elementary Italian I

This gateway course is the first half of a two-semester elementary sequence and an ampersand (&) course. Our emphasis is on the development of basic oral and written competence, and reading and aural comprehension skills. In this course, you will master the linguistic skills necessary to function in day-to-day circumstances in Italian as you develop the ability to speak and understand Italian in a communicative and meaningful context. The course also challenges you to recognize, explore, and understand cultural differences and similarities between your native culture and Italian culture.

Grammar undergirds everything we do and say in this course; whether or not we are engaged in an explicit grammar exercise, you are always learning grammar that enables you to communicate effectively. Specifically, you will learn to talk about things in your own immediate environment, such as family, friends, daily routine, likes and dislikes, and you will learn how to handle basic social interactions such as meeting people, planning events, eating out, inquiring about other people's lives, and relating information in simple terms. We will explore roughly five units of the textbook; additionally, your linguistic experience will be broadened by reading authentic texts and by viewing, listening to, and discussing cultural artifacts such as films, songs, and commercials. Class is conducted entirely in Italian. Because you will work collaboratively with your classmates and your instructor, your attendance, participation, and preparation are of the utmost importance.
Offering: Host
Grading: Amp Graded
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

ITAL102 Elementary Italian II

This course is the second half of a two-semester elementary sequence. Our emphasis is on the continuing development and strengthening of oral and written competence, and reading and comprehension skills. Specifically, you will master the linguistic skills necessary to describe and narrate simple events in the past and in the future, make comparisons, express possibility, express your point of view, and agree and disagree with the opinions of others. You will also reach a better understanding of culture, society, and everyday life in Italy as you develop the ability to speak and understand Italian in a communicative and meaningful context. The course also challenges you to recognize, explore, and understand cultural differences and similarities between your native culture and Italian culture. By the end of this course, you can expect to be able to function quite ably and with assurance in day-to-day circumstances in Italian. We will explore roughly five units of the textbook; additionally, your linguistic and cultural experience will be broadened by reading authentic texts and by viewing, listening to, and discussing cultural artifacts such as films, songs, and commercials. Grammar undergirds everything we do and say in this course; whether or not we are engaged in an explicit grammar exercise, you are always learning grammar that enables you to communicate effectively. Class is conducted entirely in Italian. Because you will work collaboratively with your classmates and your instructor, your attendance, participation, and preparation are of the utmost importance.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: ITAL101

ITAL103 Intensive Italian

Intensive Italian is a course designed for highly motivated students who wish to learn the basics of Italian language in one semester. The course emphasizes the development of basic oral and written competence, and reading and aural comprehension skills. In this course, you will master the linguistic skills necessary to function in day-to-day circumstances in Italian as you develop the ability to speak and understand Italian in a communicative and meaningful context. The course also challenges you to recognize, explore, and understand cultural differences and similarities between your native culture and Italian culture.

Grammar undergirds everything we do and say in this course; whether or not we are engaged in an explicit grammar exercise, you are always learning grammar that enables you to communicate effectively. We will use the textbook both in class and at home; additionally, your linguistic experience will be broadened by reading authentic texts and by viewing, listening to, and discussing cultural artifacts such as films, songs, and commercials. Class is conducted entirely in Italian. Because you will work collaboratively with your classmates and your instructor, your attendance, participation, and preparation are of the utmost importance.

This course is particularly recommended for students with a background in other romance languages, such as Spanish, French, or Portuguese.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

ITAL111 Intermediate Italian I

This course is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence and an ampersand (&) course. Authentic artifacts such as literary excerpts, films, newspaper articles, songs, and commercials constitute the starting points of this course. These include topics ranging from stereotypes and perceptions of Italy to significant moments in Italian history and politics, family and student life, employment, immigration/emigration, organized crime, and environmental awareness, all of which shed light on the rich diversity and complexities within Italy and offer a variety of opportunities to improve and refine your ability to speak and understand Italian in a communicative and meaningful context. The course also challenges you to recognize, explore, and understand cultural differences and similarities between your native culture and Italian culture.

Grammar undergirds everything we do and say in this course; whether or not we are engaged in an explicit grammar exercise, you are always learning grammar that enables you to communicate effectively. Specifically, you will build on previously learned grammatical structures and acquire more complex ones that will allow you to improve your ability to relate information, narrate stories, make hypotheses, express your opinions, and debate the opinions of others, both in writing and in conversation. Class is conducted entirely in Italian. Because you will work collaboratively with your classmates and your instructor, your attendance, participation, and preparation are of the utmost importance.
Offering: Host
Grading: Amp Graded
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: ITAL102

ITAL112 Intermediate Italian II

This course is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence (ITAL111 & ITAL112). Authentic artifacts such as literary excerpts, films, newspaper articles, songs, and commercials constitute the starting points of this course. These include topics ranging from stereotypes and perceptions of Italy to significant moments in Italian history and politics, family and student life, employment, immigration/emigration, organized crime, and environmental awareness, all of which shed light on the rich diversity and complexities within Italy and offer a variety of opportunities to improve and refine your ability to speak and understand Italian in a communicative and meaningful context. The course also challenges you to recognize, explore, and understand cultural differences and similarities between your native culture and Italian culture.

Grammar undergirds everything we do and say in this course; whether or not we are engaged in an explicit grammar exercise, you are always learning grammar that enables you to communicate effectively. Specifically, you will build on previously learned grammatical structures and acquire more complex ones that will allow you to improve your ability to relate information, narrate stories, make hypotheses, express your opinions, and debate the opinions of others, both in writing and in conversation. Class is conducted entirely in Italian. Because you will work collaboratively with your classmates and your instructor, your attendance, participation, and preparation are of the utmost importance.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: ITAL111

ITAL221 Culture, Society, and History in Italy

This course is designed for students who have completed at least two years of college-level Italian or who have achieved equivalent competency through study in Italy. Our primary objective is to enhance students' speaking abilities and Italian cultural literacy through exposure to a variety of Italian texts and contexts. The course will be organized both thematically and chronologically, taking into consideration a group of three themes that could change from one year to the next. Some groups or themes that might organize the course include the following groupings: l'amore, la morte, e l'altro; la città, la campagna, i sogni; il passato, il presente, e il futuro. We examine these themes in literary texts, paying attention to the different genres, and in opera and film. Students are expected to participate actively in this seminar setting. Class is conducted entirely in Italian.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: ITAL112

ITAL222 Culture, Society, and History in Italy II

This course is the counterpart to ITAL221. Whereas that course addresses specific themes in Italian texts (e.g., of love, death, and the other) from Dante until the end of the 20th century, this course focuses instead on key events in Italian culture and history. Each event narrates a particular moment in Italian history and will be examined from a variety of perspectives and in a variety of genres, including prose fiction, prose nonfiction, poetry, cinema, and history. Combinations of events will change from one academic year to the next, which is why students are allowed to repeat.

Typically, the course will use three to four events as anchors for its teaching units. Some of the possible thematic events that will structure the three or four units making up the course include the return of Marco Polo (1295), the kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara (1858), Marconi invents the radio (1895), the battle of Caporetto (1917), the retreat from the Russian front in World War II, the deportation of the Jews beginning in 1943, introduction of the Fiat 500 (1957), the 1966 flood of the Arno River, the ratification of the divorce law in 1974, the 1977 killing of Francesco Lo Russo by the Bologna police, the 1978 assassination of Aldo Moro by the left-wing terrorist group the Red Brigades, the 1992 Mafia assassinations of Judges Giovanni Falcone and Paolo Borsellino, the Tangentopoli corruption scandals of the 1990s, the election of Denny Mendez as Miss Italia (1997), the economic phenomenon of "Made in Italy" in the 1990s and Berlusconi's terms as prime minister in 1994--1995 and again in the 2000s, and the earthquake in Aquila in 2009.

How does each event resonate through the varied genres, and how do the fictional representations treat the facts of the events and the themes that emerge from them? These are two of the questions we will reflect on as we go along.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: ITAL112

ITAL224 The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Rethinking the Italian Renaissance

In this course we explore the intellectual achievements of the Italian Renaissance. We study the development of new secular values and the quest for the fulfillment of body and soul, glory, and exuberant pleasures. We question notions of beauty, symmetry, proportion, and order. We also unveil often-neglected aspects of Renaissance counter-cultures, such as the aesthetics of ugliness and obscenity and practices of marginalization (e.g., misogyny, homophobia). We inquire into the rediscovery of classical civilizations. We consider how the study of antiquity fundamentally changed the politics, literatures, arts, and philosophies of Italy at the dawn of the modern era. Through a close reading of texts by authors such as Francesco Petrarca, Niccolo Machiavelli, and Michelangelo, we investigate continuities and ruptures between their quest for human identity and ours. This course is conducted in English, and all primary and secondary sources are in English.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: RL&L224, COL224, MDST223
Prereq: None

ITAL226 The Cosmos of Dante's Comedy

This course provides an in-depth introduction to Dante Alighieri's 14th-century masterpiece as a point of entry to the history of Western literature, philosophy, and science. The core of the course consists of an intensive study of Dante's encyclopedic poem in relation to the culture and history of Medieval Europe. Major topics include: representations of the afterlife; the soul's relation to the divine; concepts of modernity and antiquity in the Middle Ages; notions of authorship and authority during the 13th and 14th centuries; vernacular poetics and the medieval genre system; the culture and materiality of manuscripts in the Middle Ages; gender and genre in Dante and the 12th- to 14th-century lyric; intertextuality and imitation; classical and medieval language theory; the role of the classics in the Middle Ages; Dante's concepts of governance; myth and theology in Dante's Christian poetics; and the reception to Dante's work from the 14th-century to present. The course combines a close analysis of Dante's literary strategies with exercises in critical writing and in multimedia translation and adaptation, aimed at prompting critical reflection on the ways in which present cultural practices are built upon the practices of the past. This course is conducted in English; no previous knowledge of Italian is required.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: RL&L226, COL234, RELI218, MDST226
Prereq: None

ITAL227 The Invention of Subjectivity: Erotic Discourse from Dante to Petrarca

In this course, we will investigate the ideology, content, and material forms of love poetry from Dante Alighieri (1265--1321) to Francesco Petrarca (1304--1374). Through a close reading of such texts as Dante's Vita Nova and Petrarca's Rerum vulgarium fragmenta (often referred to as the poetry book par excellence: il canzoniere), we will unveil the literary and fictitious nature of the poetry of love. We will explore the origins of erotic poetry in medieval France and its subsequent interpretation and re-writing in Italian courts and comuni. We will inquire into the cultural constructions of the medieval notion of the lyrical self and how it still has an impact on our own notion of consciousness. We will analyze the dynamics of composition, circulation, and reception in manuscript culture. Our close analysis of the texts as they have been preserved in manuscript form will help us gauge the differences between medieval and contemporary ways of writing, reading, and loving. This course is conducted in Italian.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

ITAL229 Italian Bodies: Race, Gender and National Identity in Modern Italian Literature

The metaphor of the nation as a body--a motherland, a fatherland, a body politic--is a familiar one. Italian literature is rich with images of Italy as a woman to be saved, a mother honored, a father avenged. But what are those bodies made of and how do they behave? What are the shapes and feels of the Italian body? In this course we will test the limits and possibilities of the metaphor, examining texts that offer different bodies and differing notions of what it means to be a body and to be Italian. As we read and discuss these texts we will take into account the times and places in which each narrative is situated, taking note of differences and commonalities, paying special attention to the ways these articulations of identity respond to transformations in the Italian national landscape. This course is conducted in Italian.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

ITAL231 Italian Colonialism and Its Legacies

This course is an introduction to the history and consequences of Italian colonialism. We will study literary and historical texts describing the social and political forces that led to colonization as well as writings by colonized people and their descendants in order to gain a balanced, comprehensive understanding of this often-overlooked moment in Italian history. Students will read futurist, fascist and postcolonial theoretical work and will examine Italian, African and Albanian cultural artifacts representative of the colonial experience. We will also discuss current debates about immigration in Italy and their relationship to this colonial history. Literary texts will include: Dell'Oro's L'abbandono; Cialente's Cortile a Cleopatra; Ali Farah's Madre piccola; Marinetti's Mafarka futurista; and work by prominent Italian scholars of colonialism such as Del Boca and Isnenghi. This course is conducted in Italian.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

ITAL232 Ruin and Redemption: Narrating 20th-Century Italy

When fugitive far-left terrorist Cesare Battisti was extradited to Italy in January 2019 to serve out a life sentence for crimes committed in the late 1970s, he provided fresh evidence for the way that 20th-century events still cast long shadows into contemporary Italy. The events, their narration, and re-narration over time tell the story of unresolved conflicts and overturned verdicts in a context characterized by repression, revisionism, and rehabilitation. In this course we study three historical events of the past century that continue to haunt contemporary Italian society, culture, and politics: Fascism; civil war and resistance; and the political violence of terrorism in the 1970s and 80s. We approach these events by examining the ever-changing narratives about them. For each narrative we focus on specific issues (e.g., for Fascism: the rise of Fascism, racism and anti-Semitism, colonialism, Mussolini's cult of personality, the exaltation of war, Fascist intellectuals, the art of the regime), but we use these as an entry point to articulate contradictions and complexity. We explore these narratives through various media and forms of expression: from films to novels, from landmarks to newspaper articles, from poems to billboards. By exploring how the polarizations of these narratives flow into the 21st century, we unveil the fractures and conflicting agents at the core of contemporary Italy.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: ITAL112

ITAL233 Modern Italy on the Silver Screen: 1960--2015

This course is an introduction to modern Italian culture through the lens of Italian cinema. Beginning in the postwar era, we will look at the radical transformations that have shaped contemporary Italy by examining the aesthetic and narrative trends of the silver screen. Italian cinema holds an important place in global film culture, giving rise to new artistic forms (from neorealism to spaghetti westerns and arthouse slashers) that have dramatically impacted foreign and domestic sensibilities. Among the films screened are Fellini's La dolce vita, Pasolini's Mamma Roma, De Sica's Matrimonio all'italiana, Leone's Il buono, il brutto, il cattivo, Argento's Suspiria, Moretti's Caro diario, Ozpetek's Saturno contro, and Giordana's Quando sei nato non puoi più nasconderti. Each film screening is accompanied by a brief presentation of the socio-historical context in which it was produced, allowing students to situate the artistic projects within broader Italian social and political histories. By the end of the term students will have an understanding of the last half-century of Italian national history and will be familiar with key terms in film theory and analysis. This course is taught in English; films will be screened in Italian with English subtitles.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: RL&L233
Prereq: None

ITAL235 The Invention of Fiction: Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron

In this course we read and discuss Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron (ca. 1353), a collection of 100 short stories traded by an "honest brigade" of 10 Florentine men and women. They tell each other these stories while sheltered in a secluded villa as the plague of 1348 rages in Florence. We study the Decameron as both a product and an interpretation of the world Boccaccio inhabited. We examine the Decameron's tales and narrative frame as a point of entry into the cultural and social environment of medieval Italy. We look at its scurrilous, amusing, and provocative innuendos as traces of erotic, religious, ethnic, and cultural questions. We investigate the sexual exuberance of many of Boccaccio's tales and the tension between "high" and "low" culture. We consider the development of mercantilism and literacy in early-modern Europe and its emerging virtues of wit and self-reliance. We review the dynamics of composition and reception in manuscript culture and the book's adaptation into different media, from illuminations to film. And by impersonating the 10 Florentines, we will reenact their pastime of telling stories and appreciate Boccaccio's remarkably modern sensibility and unsurpassed art of writing fiction. This course is conducted in Italian.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: MDST245, COL255
Prereq: None

ITAL236 Inferno

In this course we read and discuss Dante's Inferno (ca. 1306-1309) and its afterlife. Inferno is the poetic description of Dante's (imagined or actual) journey through Hell. We study how its poetry and narrative embody the notions of love, sorrow, evil, guilt, redemption, and punishment. We examine the poem as both a product and an interpretation of the world it describes and of its radical otherness: its representation of the otherworld, its relationship with religion and faith, its fear of death, its obsession with the Devil. We inquire into Dante's inventiveness and poetic technique, reviewing his magisterial use of realistic and figurative language. We observe how Inferno casts its long shadow on modern culture: in the description of the horror of Nazi concentration camps (Primo Levi's memoir), or in the representation of the inauthentic life in consumerist society (Pier Paolo Pasolini's rewriting of Inferno in contemporary Italy). We investigate the challenges that Dante's text elicits when it migrates to visual and cinematic arts (or to Disney comics), continuously camouflaging and adapting to different media. And we critically reflect on how, after seven hundred years, Inferno has not finished saying what it has to say. The course is conducted in Italian.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: None

ITAL242 Home Movies: Italian Families on Film

What is "the family" in Italy's contemporary social and cultural context? How has it changed over time? How has it responded to the transformations of Italian society since the time of the postwar economic miracle until today? Have its contours changed to adapt to new values? Has it fossilized existing values? Are families limited to flesh-and-blood kinship, or are they constructed along lines of shared values and loyalty? This course seeks some answers to these questions through a sustained exploration of a variety of types of families as they are presented in Italian cinema from roughly 1960 through today. We will take stock of the "traditional" family and the traditional social values connected to it, seeking to understand how filmmakers, through their focus on the family, enter into the debate concerning tradition and change within the social context. In addition to conventional families, we will also examine the elective family that takes shape as the Mafia family. Finally, we will also explore some examples of contemporary families that challenge the traditional paradigm--for example, single-parent and same-sex families. After discussion of critical readings in sociology and anthropology that will help frame our examination throughout the semester, we will concentrate on film texts. This course is conducted in Italian.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: ITAL221 OR ITAL222

ITAL247 Coming Out/Coming of Age: Narratives of Becoming in Italian Culture

By examining narratives of "becoming" in Italian literary and screen texts, we will work to read against a dominant "master" narrative of Italian culture that is cis-male, patriarchal, and "white." The literary and screen texts we will explore in depth include some "classic" narratives of coming of age in the Italian cultural tradition which we will lay alongside Italian cultural "coming out" narratives, some "classic," others less so. What can we learn from such adjacencies? What does one "come out" of with regard to either strand of inquiry? Is adolescence a "closet" out of which one emerges with a sexual identity? Does one come of age as an artist or "come out" as a practitioner of a particular artistic genre (filmmaker, poet, novelist)? How do artistic choices of practice subtend and inform sexual identity? What gets left behind in this "progress" of "becoming"? These are some of the questions we will address in this course, conducted in Italian.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Prereq: ITAL221

ITAL401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ITAL402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ITAL403 Department/Program Project or Essay

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

ITAL407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

ITAL408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

ITAL409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ITAL410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ITAL411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ITAL412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ITAL419 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

ITAL420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

ITAL491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ITAL492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT