2021-2022 Edition

Academic Catalog

Education Studies (EDST)

EDST101 Introduction to Education Studies

This seminar will provide a space for newly declared education studies majors and minors to come together to develop as a cohort through learning about each other's educational backgrounds and scholarly interests. In addition, students will come together as a learning community to learn more about the areas of research and pedagogy being implemented by the Wesleyan faculty in education studies and to build rapport with faculty members. The course content will cover the areas defined in the education studies major--including human development and learning; pedagogy; social, cultural, historical, and philosophical disciplines in education; transformative justice in education; methodologies in the study of education, including qualitative and quantitative; and the connection and tension between academic coursework and practical experiences in educational settings--and will introduce students to additional approaches and subfields.

Course components will include: (1) cohort-building activities to introduce the newly declared majors to each other and their educational backgrounds; (2) collaborative reading and discussion of work taking place at and being studied by Wesleyan faculty in ed studies; (3) creating a space to discuss and read further about talks by visiting speakers, colloquia, or other events in the College of Education Studies; (4) guest teaching by EDST and outside faculty; and (5) a reflection paper on the path they plan to pursue through the major/minor.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Prereq: None

EDST110F Writing about Teaching: An Exploration of American Educational Ideals through Writing and Film (FYS)

This seminar explores conceptions of teaching and learning through examination of fictional, ethnographic, and documentary accounts of teachers and their work. We will examine the portrayal of teaching in literature, creative nonfiction, journalism, and scholarly field research, as well as in film. What do these forms of representation tell us about cultural perceptions of schooling, teaching, and learning in the 20th and 21st century? What can we learn from close analysis of the ways in which authors use words and images to portray teachers and students? Participants in this seminar will have the opportunity to reflect upon their own perceptions of teaching and learning, to ground those perceptions in a philosophy of education, and to explore the ways in which writing well about teaching, from many disciplinary perspectives, can impact the profession and our understanding of the enterprise of teaching and learning. Students will practice a variety of modes of writing (critical and analytical essays; personal essays; creative writing; brief ethnography and Lightfoot's social science "portraiture" method) and analysis of both writing and film, as well as visual thinking strategies and techniques for observing and documenting cultures of learning.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-EDST
Prereq: None

EDST114F Why You Can't Write (FYS)

Institutions of higher education have required first-year students to take writing courses for well over a century. In doing so, they have made it clear that educational and professional success are deeply tied to writing skills. But why is this? This class asks what it means to teach students how to write by probing seemingly stable concepts and practices like language and communication. We will discuss the history of writing studies in higher education before taking up debates over literacy, language standardization, education as imperialism and colonialism, theories of writing instruction, assignment design, and assessment practices. In addition to introducing students to the field of composition, rhetoric, and writing studies, so, too, will this course center the practice of writing. As such, students can expect to write, revise, and comment on classmates' writing regularly. Assignments will include a personal literacy narrative, response papers, weekly journals, and creative projects like assignment and rubric design.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT114F
Prereq: None

EDST140L Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

This course explores theories and teaching methods related to learning English as a second language (ESL). Students will critically examine current and past "best practices" for teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) and the seminal theories they are based on. In addition, we will discuss the various needs of English language learners, including both children and adults, and students coming from a variety of social and cultural backgrounds. Students will be asked to apply what they've learned by creating their own lesson plans and activities, critiquing ESL textbooks, and giving teaching demonstrations. If you choose to work with a student (or tutor in an organization), you may be able to use this class to fulfill a Category 5 requirement in Education Studies.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT140L, ENGL143L
Prereq: None

EDST201 Learning to Write

Writing is central to education in the U.S., but how does someone learn to write? In this course, students will consider this question by reading theories of composition, debating key concepts of writing such as reflection, transfer, and translanguaging, as well as discussing scholarship out of cultural studies, literacy studies, genre studies, technical and professional writing, and public writing. Together we will explore the potential of writing education, carefully considering how we, as educators, can foster just and innovative writing education. As we read about writing instruction, literacy, and assessment, students will be expected to bring scholarship in dialogue with lived experience. To do so, they will engage in a number of praxis-based assignments, including group work to develop assignments, assessment practices, and curricular recommendations. The course will culminate in a final project of each students' design, that tackles the practicalities of teaching writing.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT201
Prereq: None

EDST202 Pedagogy for Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Tutors

This course offers an introduction to pedagogical techniques and theories for teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). The class is ideal for students considering a career in K-12 education, as the number of students whose first language is not English is rising in the U.S. every year. Students enrolled in this course will gain practical experience by committing to volunteering at Middletown public schools while taking this course and are encouraged to continue their service afterward. There is a volunteering commitment of 2 hours/week minimum during the semester.

This course fulfills the Pedagogy and Practicum requirements for the Education Studies major and minor.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT202
Prereq: None

EDST205 English Language Learners and US Language Policy

This course explores how explicit and implicit language policies in institutions of power affect businesses, schools, and the legal system. More specifically, the course investigates how language choices, translations, and the policies regarding both affect ESL programs in K-12 education, bilingual businesses, immigration policies, and the U.S. legal system. We will also discuss the recommendations of scholars for increasing multilingualism in business and education, improving education for English-language learners, and efforts to improve non-native English speakers' ability to navigate the legal system. The course is recommended for non-native speakers of English and anyone considering working with English-language learners such as teachers, tutors, NGO personnel, and legal or business professionals.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT205, AMST227
Prereq: None

EDST210 Educational Gaming Lab: Project-Based, Game-Based Pedagogy Approaches

In the past two decades, crowdfunding and renewed interest in games (board games, role-playing games, digital games, and instructional games) have created an increased and diverse gaming production, which has become the subject of several studies, articles, and projects related to all areas of education, from hard sciences to language learning and the arts. In an effort to explore how a game-informed pedagogy can work in various types of courses and to highlight analog and/or digital gaming approaches that have worked inside and outside the language classroom, this course will explore the basics of (Video) Game-Based Learning (VGBL or GBL) applied to several disciplines, as well as present a selection of classroom projects informed by its principles.

Educational Gaming Lab is designed as a project-based gaming laboratory that will focus on why and how analog and/or digital games can be effective tools for pedagogy; examples will include video games, board games, and role-playing games. Participants will discuss the application of gaming principles to various subjects and types of classrooms; then, they will engage in a final project in which they will either adapt existing games for a specific discipline or create brand new educational games.

The course will be conducted in English, and games will be created in English (or in the relevant target language, if the game is for language learning).
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Identical With: IDEA209
Prereq: None

EDST221 Decolonizing Education

Who determines what is true and worth knowing? How has the construction of knowledge and academic traditions from across the globe been impacted by such phenomena as (post)modernity, (neo)colonialism, and (neo)liberalism? Why do any of the questions above matter to your own personal history, beliefs, and identity? This course will provide a space for students to critically examine the history and development of the discourses that have shaped their educational experiences and their understanding of the purpose of education. The first half of the course will focus on texts and assignments that interrogate how some of our modern epistemological discourses were formed and maintained through the lens of postcolonial studies and critical educational studies.

The second half of the course will center on ways people have worked within these dominant modes of thought to resist hegemonic modern discourses that privilege logical positivism, quantification, objectivism, and Western European histories and ideologies above all else. This course will involve reflection essays on weekly readings, intergroup dialogue, and activities that will encourage students to examine their own connection to the theoretical concepts presented in class. The culminating project/final will be a scholarly personal narrative wherein students will synthesize both what they learned about themselves and the content that was presented during the course.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Prereq: None

EDST221Z Decolonizing Education

Please note: Students should expect some readings and assignments to be due during winter break, prior to beginning Winter Session. Please visit the Winter Session website for the full syllabus -- http://www.wesleyan.edu/wintersession.

Who determines what is true and worth knowing? How has the construction of knowledge and academic traditions from across the globe been impacted by such phenomena as (post)modernity, (neo)colonialism, and (neo)liberalism? Why do any of the questions above matter to your own personal history, beliefs, and identity? This course will provide a space for students to critically examine the history and development of the discourses that have shaped their educational experiences and their understanding of the purpose of education. The first half of the course will focus on texts and assignments that interrogate how some of our modern epistemological discourses were formed and maintained through the lens of postcolonial studies and critical educational studies.

The second half of the course will center on ways people have worked within these dominant modes of thought to resist hegemonic modern discourses that privileges logical positivism, quantification, objectivism, and Western European histories and ideologies above all else. This coursework will involve reflection essays on class lectures and readings due before the class starts on Jan. 4th. The synchronous coursework will include intergroup dialogue and group activities that will encourage students to examine their own connection to the theoretical concepts presented in the lectures and homework assignments. The culminating project/final will be a scholarly personal narrative wherein students will synthesize both what they learned about themselves and the content that was presented during the course.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Prereq: None

EDST223 Second Language Acquisition and Teaching

This course introduces students to the field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA) and addresses the following questions: How do humans learn additional languages after they have acquired their first? Why is there such variability observed in the rates and outcomes of second language learning? Is it possible to attain native(-like) linguistic competence in another language?

We begin with the theories and applications of SLA, and then examine major pedagogical movements in Second Language Teaching in the U.S. Students will develop the ability to critically assess current methods, materials, and techniques for teaching various language skills and will produce their own pedagogical activities to be used in a classroom setting. Students of French and Spanish may also wish to enroll in RL&L 223L, a 0.5 credit service learning course in which students volunteer in the Middletown Public Schools.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: RL&L223
Prereq: None

EDST223L Second Language Acquisition & Pedagogy - Teaching Romance Languages

How do humans learn additional languages after they have acquired their first? Why is there such variability observed in the rates and outcomes of second language learning? Is it possible to attain native(-like) linguistic competence in another language? This course is intended for students who may be considering a career in education. We begin with the theories and applications of SLA, and then examine major pedagogical movements in Second Language Teaching in the U.S. Students will develop the ability to critically assess current methods, materials, and techniques for teaching various language skills and will produce their own pedagogical activities to be used in a classroom setting.

In this service-learning course, students are required to volunteer a minimum of two hours per week in the Middletown Public Schools, assisting French, Italian, and Spanish teachers in their world language classes. Students will write weekly journal entries reflecting on their classroom experience, and will learn to evaluate, adapt, and create pedagogical materials. By the end of the semester, they will have created a portfolio of activities that can be used in a foreign language classroom.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: RL&L223L
Prereq: None

EDST225Z Education and Empire

Wherever the U.S. has sought to gain or maintain control, whether by way of enslavement, forced assimilation, settler colonialism, or military occupation and imperialist rule abroad, education has played an all-too-often-overlooked supporting role. Yet wherever this is true, there are also people who have used education as a means of resistance, rebellion, revolution, and liberation. This course offers an introduction to the transnational history of education in relation to the development of U.S. empire both at home and abroad. By bringing together topics often approached separately--like immigration, pedagogy, settler colonialism, African American history, and the history of the U.S. empire--we will interrogate the ways that education has been mobilized to deploy power: controlling knowledge, categorizing and policing difference, administering unequal paths to citizenship/belonging, forcing assimilation, promoting socioeconomic divides, and asserting discipline and control. Topics to be covered include American Indian education and self-determination, African American education in slavery and freedom, U.S. colonial education in the Philippines/Cuba/Puerto Rico, immigration and forced Americanization schooling, Latinx fights for educational access and autonomy, State Department experiments in educational diplomacy, and knowledge production for national security and the war on terror. Throughout, we will draw links between the past and the present and between the classroom and geopolitics. Together, we will ask what it might mean to "decolonize" or "indigenize" education today and work on developing the ability to imagine otherwise.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Prereq: None

EDST230 Schools in Society

What role have schools played in the evolution of American Society? What role could/should they play, going forward? This course takes a topical approach to these questions. We will explore the relationship between schools, democracy, and social progress; take a close look at race and racism in America's schools; learn how schools work in terms of policy, governance, and funding; and critically analyze the effects of many waves of educational "reform," including the current movement towards school privatization. While the focus is on the American school system, our perspective will be enlarged by comparison between this system and other approaches to education around the globe.

This course fulfills the Foundations, Breadth Category 2, or Elective requirement for the Education Studies major and minor.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Prereq: None

EDST231 Pedagogy & Power

This course explores the social, historical, philosophical, and pedagogical foundations of the field of education studies. Guiding questions include: What are the purposes of education? How does education reproduce inequalities? Conversely, how does education serve as a tool for liberation? As students learn about the experiences of their classmates and develop different analytic frameworks for thinking about educational processes, they will become critical and reflective observers of their own educational backgrounds and of contemporary educational reforms.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Prereq: None

EDST232 Italy at School: Biography of a Nation

Soon after the unification of Italy (1861), the Coppino Law extended primary school to five years, making it free of charge and mandatory for its first three years (1877). Edmondo De Amicis would subsequently depict these reforms in his best-selling novel Cuore (1886), a text that introduced some enduring features of school narratives but also many stereotypes, thus attracting constant criticism and inspiring several parodies of its moralistic underpinnings. Ever since then school narratives have become a key component of Italian culture, creating a genre that has thrived especially in the last three decades, with a number of both fiction and nonfiction books published by teacher-writers who have reflected on their experience.

In this course we will study Italy from the perspective of these texts about school that often originated within school walls themselves. In so doing, we will reconstruct the history of a relatively young country, Italy, through the institution that, like no other, has been given the responsibility of "making Italians." At the same time we will question the image of Italian society that school narratives have, intentionally or not, contributed to portraying. In addition to reading Lucio Mastronardi's Il maestro di Vigevano (1962), we will focus on a wide range of materials, including novels, memoirs, poems, popular songs, films, and works of art that, even in the absence of a unanimously acclaimed "classic" of the genre, have shaped the Italian collective imaginary. Materials will be organized around five poles that have been quintessential to the debate on school in Italy across politics and culture: characters (teachers and students, obviously, but also colleagues, classmates, and families), labor and working conditions (including themes such as precarious work, class conflict, labor rights), gender and identity (questioning traditional gender roles and discussing integration of migrants at school), places and geographies (addressing topics from school design to teaching in prisons, as well as center-periphery integration and north-south divide), and actions (both those of teachers and of students, such as obtaining a certification vs. passing a test, disciplining students vs. questioning teachers' authority, resigning from job vs. cutting classes). The course will be conducted in Italian.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-RLAN
Identical With: ITAL232
Prereq: ITAL112

EDST250Z Zero to Infinity: The Psychology of Numbers

What are the origins of mathematical thinking, and why do some people become experts while others get nervous calculating a tip? Before children are ever taught formal mathematics in a classroom, they are confronted with situations where they must use their intuitive understanding of numbers, geometry, and space to successfully navigate their environments. Yet, individual differences in math achievement emerge early in development and often persist throughout children's education. In this course we read and discuss both foundational and cutting-edge articles from cognitive science, education, and psychology to understand how mathematical thinking develops. We will also tackle questions such as: How do culture and varying social contexts affect numerical understanding? What do we know about gender differences in math achievement? How do stereotypes, prejudice, and math anxiety affect math performance? This class will involve a blend of synchronous class-time meetings and asynchronous work.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Identical With: PSYC288Z
Prereq: None

EDST253 Educational Psychology

This course will focus on three major topics and how they relate to current educational policy debates. The first topic will be an examination of the fundamental purpose of school. We will discuss theoretical and empirical perspectives on why schools exist and ways in which school purpose varies by school type (e.g., public, private, charter) and location (e.g., by state and country). The second topic to be covered relates to the implementation of school mission. In this context, we will reflect on how theories of child development, student motivation, classroom management, and pedagogy inform instructional practice. Finally, the third major topic that will be covered is how to determine whether schools are achieving their stated goals. We will examine the appropriate (and inappropriate) uses of assessment for understanding whether students are learning, whether teachers are effective, and whether a school has a positive or negative climate.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PSYC
Identical With: PSYC253
Prereq: None

EDST301 Senior Seminar in Education Studies

The senior seminar will provide a space for seniors in the education studies major, as a learning community, to reflect on and deepen their knowledge and understanding in core areas of education studies. Students will be expected to bring in relevant material from their other courses; to learn and discuss new material; and to work collaboratively to develop a grounding in the study of education individually and as a group. The course content will cover the areas defined in the education studies major, including human development and learning; pedagogy; social, cultural, historical, and philosophical disciplines in education; transformative justice in education; methodologies in the study of education, including ethnography and quantitative approaches. Discussions will explore the connection and tension between academic coursework and practical experiences in educational settings, and introduce students to additional approaches and subfields.

Course components will include: (1) bridging across different students' distinct experiences in their classes relevant to each content area; (2) collaborative reading and discussion of new work beyond the scope of the existing EDST courses; (3) creating a space to discuss and read further about talks by visiting speakers, colloquia, or other events in the College of Education Studies; (4) guest teaching by EDST and outside faculty; and (5) an independent senior project (for thesis writers, this can serve as a scaffold to make progress on the thesis).
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

EDST310 Practicum in Education Studies

This seminar is intended to help students develop the skills to learn from experience in educational settings, through rigorous reflection, analysis, scholarly inquiry into educational questions, and action/implementation of new ideas. It is designed for students with previous coursework in education, experience in educational settings, or both. Students will be placed in a variety of educational settings in the community and each student will craft an independent study, with ongoing guidance from the professor and from the group, related to their placement. Class sessions will be seminar-style with students sharing and workshopping their studies and their practice. There will be group readings on aspects of education studies including reflective practice, classroom ethnography/teacher research, and observational techniques, but students will also develop individualized reading lists according to the focus of their independent study. In addition to ongoing written work in the form of analytic journals and critical reading synopses, students will complete an individualized final paper or project integrating their research and experience over the semester, and give a final presentation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Prereq: None

EDST311 Community Impact Practicum: Building Capacity to Support Educational Enrichment

In this practicum course, students will build an intellectual and practical framework to guide their volunteer work in educational settings in the local community. What does it mean to "help"? How do we assess the needs of community partners and build the knowledge and skills that will allow us to address those needs? What do we need to know and understand about the people with whom we work? What does research have to say about effective tutoring techniques and practices? How can we design meaningful learning experiences? How can we maximize not only our impact in the community, but also our own growth and learning? Through reflection on experiential learning and the study of scholarship addressing these questions, students will develop knowledge and skills to improve their effectiveness in supporting educational enrichment. Students taking this course must be engaged in at least 90 minutes per week of community service in an educational setting throughout the semester.

Please note: If you are looking for a practicum that is more focused on the K-12 classroom experience, please see EDST310: Practicum in Education Studies. In that practicum seminar, students carry out their own independent study related to their classroom placement.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Identical With: CSPL311
Prereq: None

EDST341 Case Studies in Educational Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship, innovation, and reform are a defining part of the fabric of K-12 education in the US and other places, presenting opportunities and risks. For the first two months of the course, we will be visited each week by one or more experts who have led or studied innovative or entrepreneurial projects in the education sector. Perspectives and cases to be discussed include the founding of schools and businesses, start-up ventures, social entrepreneurship and nonprofit organizations, educational law and policy, and innovation within public schools and districts. Students will learn from conversations with experts in the field about how to define problems in education, how different people have approached solutions to these problems, and lessons learned. The professor and students will work together to draw connections between the various case studies and to articulate larger principles. Our study will culminate in a guided project in which students will develop an educational innovation to solve a specific problem that they have learned about and following some of the principles of design and innovation that they have learned.

The last month of the course will be a mini-class on Education and Law, taught by a distinguished visiting professor Dr. Preston Green. The mini-class will cover some of the ways that innovation and entrepreneurship relate to educational law, how regulations are used and misused in the name of educational innovation, and current and emerging legal issues with charter schools and vouchers. Students will complete a separate culminating assessment for this portion of the course.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

EDST342 Questioning Authority: On the Politics of the Teacher-Student Relationship

What is the authority of the teacher in an era where the legitimacy of institutions and curriculum are under fire? Can hierarchical relationships between teachers and students be beneficial for learning and for political life? What are alternative conceptions of the teacher-student relationship? This course will explore different models of teaching within the history of political thought and beyond. From Socrates to the present, the context and manner of teaching has been just as important to political theorists as the content itself. The course will consider how questions of power, sexuality, risk, wisdom, and friendship inform different pedagogical styles and their implications for preparing citizens for democratic life. Readings include John Locke, Immanuel Kant, Alexis deTocqueville, John Dewey, Hannah Arendt, Mr. Rogers, Jacques Ranciere, Bernard Stiegler, Laura Kipnis, and others.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: GOVT342
Prereq: None

EDST345 Education Technology - Sociological Perspectives & Implications

How do computers, smartphones, the internet, and other educational technologies impact students and teachers? In this course, students will apply the fundamental tools and approaches of educational and social science research to better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of the educational technologies that surround and support students and teachers around the world. As such, students will learn about the history of education and evolution of technology with a focus on teaching, learning, and assessment applications in K12 education.

Through readings, class discussion, assignments, and analyses of real-world teaching and learning data, students will consider educational technology frameworks, research, practice, and policy. Specifically, students will consider how different student, teacher, and system-wide educational technologies: 1) have impacted students, teachers, families, schools, and communities across a broad range of educational outcomes and groups, i.e., gender, class, race/ethnicity.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Prereq: None

EDST350 Sociology of Knowledge

This course provides a survey of the sociology of knowledge, a subfield of sociology that investigates how social structures shape the production of knowledge and how knowledge, in turn, shapes society.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SISP
Identical With: SISP350, SOC350
Prereq: None

EDST355 The Long Struggle: Examining New Perspectives on Education Reform

Black Teachers' ongoing struggle to enact anti-racist practices and policies while navigating segregation and significant resource challenges provide powerful testimony of the peculiar limitations of traditional urban education reform movements.

This course will help students understand the inextricable links between student achievement, opportunity, and community progress by examining African American teachers' experiences in schools. The historical and present-day experiences of Black teachers will be used to anchor the analysis of education reform through the eyes of too often marginalized communities. This course will review historical narrative, examine present-day policy, and allow students to gain first-hand perspectives from "front-line" education and policy leaders.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-EDST
Prereq: None

EDST358 Fugitive Perspectives on Education and Civil Society

In 1946, the African American novelist Ann Petry imagined what a white schoolteacher might think about working with black students in Harlem, New York: "Working in this school was like being in a jungle. It was filled with the smell of the jungle, she thought: tainted food, rank, unwashed bodies." Petry had herself worked in Harlem schools. She also held credentials from well-heeled white schools in Connecticut. Despite her own academic success, she questioned the inherent value of schools that regarded black children as if they were untamed savages.

Challenging prevailing narratives of excellence and achievement, this course examines fugitive perspectives of black, Indigenous, LBGTQ, and poor folks who resisted compulsory schooling and avoided conscription into so-called civilized society. If, as historian Michael B. Katz has argued, US schools "are imperial institutions designed to civilize the natives; they exist to do something to poor children, especially, now, children who are black or brown," then why should any self-respecting black or brown child endure such schooling? What might so-called truants, illiterates, failures, burnouts, dropouts, and delinquents teach us about education and civil society?

The history of education, however, has largely been interpreted from a biased perspective--namely, those who have been successfully schooled. We will therefore search for contrary voices in fragments of oral culture, ranging from slave narratives to folktales and recorded music. Contemporary scholarship will inform our analysis. Interdisciplinary scholars such as James Scott, Eric Hobsbawm, Tera Hunter, Saidiya Hartman, Lisa Brooks, and Audra Simpson will illustrate how to read against the grain and unearth hidden transcripts from classic authors such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Carter G. Woodson, Anna Julia Cooper, and Gertrude Simmons Bonin.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM358, AMST358
Prereq: None

EDST373 Religion, Science, and Empire: Crucible of a Globalized World

The development of modern science--and of modernity itself--not only coincided with the rise of European imperialism, it was abetted by it. Meanwhile, religion was integral to both the roots of European science and Western encounters with others. This class will explore how the intersections of religion, science, and empire have formed a globalized world with examples of European engagement with the Americas, Middle East, and, particularly, India from the age of Columbus through to the space race. We will examine how the disciplines we know today as biology, anthropology, archaeology, folklore, and the history of religions all crystallized in the crucible of imperial encounter and how non-Westerners have embraced, engaged, and resisted these epistemes.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: RELI373, SISP373
Prereq: None

EDST399 Abolitionist University Studies

This course explores historical materialist theorizations of the practices and future possibilities of the U.S. university as a tool of social reproduction and space of potentially revolutionary thought. In so doing, the readings, assignments, and discussion will be inspired by Stefano Harney and Fred Moten's provocation to reinterpret abolitionism as "not so much the abolition of prisons but the abolition of a society that could have prisons, that could have slavery, that could have the wage, and therefore not abolition as the elimination of anything but abolition as the founding of a new society." Students will consider how conventional renderings of the university in higher education studies, critical university studies, and the popular cultural imaginary are predicated upon an often romanticized and fundamentally limited geographic and historical understanding of the work of colleges and universities. In response, the course cultivates a more capacious conceptualization of the historical and contemporary function of the university as a social form. In taking up abolitionism as both a method and critical analytic, the course will challenge students to imagine the revolutionary possibilities of an abolition university that aligns itself with movements beyond the institution, while reflecting on the particular importance and challenge of enacting such a vision in our current political moment.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CHUM
Identical With: SOC399M, FGSS311
Prereq: None

EDST400 Ford Seminar

The Ford Seminar continues the training and professional development of the Writing Workshop staff.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT400
Prereq: None

EDST401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

EDST402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

EDST409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

EDST410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

EDST411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

EDST412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

EDST419 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

EDST465 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

EDST466 Education In The Field

Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

EDST491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U