2020-2021 Edition

Academic Catalog

Center for the Study of Public Life (CSPL)

CSPL115F Diffusion of Innovation (FYS)

Most inventions never make it out of the laboratory. Few reach the public. Why? Innovations and great ideas are not self-evident. Rather, inventors must persuade their fellow citizens that their ideas have merit and are worth adopting. This course will survey the broad field of "Diffusion of Innovations." Through case studies from around the globe and discussions of diffusion theory, students will learn how innovations ranging from vaccines to the world's largest particle accelerator gained acceptance through analog and digital communication. Students will also learn about diffusion failures ranging from water boiling to the DVORAK keyboard. They will then design a strategy for disseminating an existing but underappreciated scientific or technological innovation to United States adopters. The strategy will demonstrate a keen appreciation of scientific merit, diffusion of innovation theory, and the nuances of U.S. culture. This first year seminar course will also familiarize students with the methods used to collect, interpret, analyze, and present evidence in the social sciences, particularly in the field of communication.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL116F Good Books on Bad Wars (FYS)

This course explores war through some of the best books of theory, fiction, and nonfiction. The purpose of war is to achieve a policy that leads to a better peace after the war's end than the peace that existed before the war began. But the nature of war is to serve itself if policy does not guide and constrain war. This course begins with discussion of the best foundational works of theory to build an understanding of the epistemology of war. The students will subsequently read, analyze, and discuss some of the best works of nonfiction and fiction on bad wars when judged by quality of strategy, magnitude of losses, or duration of fighting. The book subjects range from the American Civil War to the post-9/11 wars. The readings and seminar discussions vary from the reasons why the wars began to the conduct and outcomes of the wars. This course lies at the intersection of international relations, history, and conflict studies. It will increase the students' understanding of how policy, strategy, and war interact. A central aim of this seminar is to improve critical thinking and writing.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: GOVT116F
Prereq: None

CSPL127 Introduction to Financial Accounting

In this course, no prior accounting knowledge is required or assumed. Students learn how accountants define assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses and where those items appear in firms' balance sheets and income statements. The purposes and limitations of these two financial statements as well as the statement of cash flows are considered. Students gain an understanding of the accounting choices allowed to firms for reporting to stockholders and creditors and learn how the use of different accounting methods for similar economic events creates challenges for analysts. Instances of questionable financial reporting and strategies that can aid in their discovery are addressed. Later assignments focus on ratio analysis of actual firms' financial statements, including techniques to identify firms in financial trouble.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ECON
Identical With: ECON127
Prereq: ECON101 OR ECON110

CSPL130 Frontiers of Leadership

Frontiers of Leadership will focus on the basic principles of personal and interpersonal leadership that can be used in any life arena. The course will explore variables that affect productivity, effectiveness, and efficiency, and a variety of interpersonal skill sets. Emphasis will be placed on vision, decision-making, time management, career development, team building, conflict, ethics, identity, communication skills, and diversity issues. In addition, we will explore a variety of other topics including developing students' personal leadership styles. Classroom teaching methods will include class discussion, group exercises, videos, oral presentations, written assignments, and a group project. By the end of the course, students will have increased their personal and interpersonal awareness, sharpened their analytical skills, and gained a greater understanding of the complex issues facing today's leaders. This quarter-credit course will take place over eight weeks and will meet on a weekly basis.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.25
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL140F Thinking with Things (FYS)

This course explores the ways in which we think and act in relation to things. At times provocations for thought, at times emotional companions or functional collaborators, things are not only symbolic carriers of the values and meanings that we assign, but are also actors with agency and subjectivity. We critically consider the implications of this and the role of things in a variety of contexts from the historical to the emotional to the sociocultural to the sacred. The course considers how we make, use, and consume things and how, in turn, things make, use, and consume us. Transdisciplinary in its orientation, this course draws insight from anthropology, cultural studies, philosophy, material studies, art, and design. We will examine a number of projects dealing with objects and these will serve as inspirational, theoretical, and methodological models for the projects students will develop over the course of the semester.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL200 Integrative Learning Project 1: Reflecting About the Liberal Arts

The Integrative Learning Project is a .50 credit course that allows students to learn to describe in a coherent and engaging narrative the various academic and non-academic activities, projects, and experiences that have been important for them while in college and to practice doing so for a variety of audiences (e.g. employers, graduate schools, etc.). Participants should be students who are interested in crafting a narrative about their personal and intellectual development, and who want to be able to talk about what skills they have cultivated during their time at Wesleyan and what they still want to learn.

All sophomores, juniors and seniors are welcome in this course. This course requires a willingness to discuss one's strengths, achievements, weaknesses, and failures. Students will not only engage in reflection about their skills and experiences, but will also have the opportunity to design an online portfolio in WordPress, the world's most popular content management software, and test the portfolio with different audiences by employing user experience design (UX) principles and research methodologies. Students can take this course more than once, but only once per academic year.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: None
Identical With: WRCT200, RL&L250, AFAM250
Prereq: None

CSPL201 Foundations of Civic Engagement

The promise of democracy is that citizens can act together to shape the conditions of their collective lives. This class examines that promise, focusing on the ways in which civic engagement can contribute to its realization. We examine civic engagement both as a theoretical perspective on citizen participation and an active practice. What does it mean to have a truly democratic society? What is the role of citizen participation, both within formal political activity and in civil society generally? What role should experts play in democratic politics, and how can expertise be squared with democratic equality? What, if any, responsibility does the University have to promote civic engagement?
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-GOVT
Identical With: GOVT346
Prereq: None

CSPL202 Introduction to Design Thinking: Liberal Arts to Epic Challenges

Human-centered design or design thinking taps the creativity and diversity of a team to develop solutions to complex problems, following careful observation to gain the human perspective of a problem. Increasingly, this methodology is at the center of innovative practices in business, nonprofits, and governments. It can be particularly effective in addressing the human needs that are the focus of social enterprise and policy. Many of the disciplines that comprise the liberal arts education are valued sources of perspective and ideas contributing to solutions.

The most progressive and effective solutions to many problems are those that emerge from closely observing human patterns and then encouraging diverse imaginations to create rapid prototypes of solutions that can be tested and refined. The result is human-centered, rather than high-level policy influences for social change. Although the methodology is called "design thinking," the approach is used in designing experiences, services, and organizations, as well as objects. No design background is required.

The class sessions will consist of (1) the presentation of methods and theories, (2) case studies to be worked on in teams either in the session or between sessions, and (3) discussions with faculty members from other disciplines and designers who have worked on significant engagements for social change. Design thinking can be a purposeful link to the application of other disciplines to real-world problems, including anthropology, and behavioral economics.

An optional field trip is planned to work through a problem in the IBM Design Studio in New York City.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL206 Group Psychology in Politics: Local, State, and National Perspectives

This course is an introduction to the use of group dynamics to understand the deep personal and systems-level issues at play in the body politic. This framework is applicable at the local, state, national, and international levels. Often, if not most of the time, these issues play an outsized role in any public policy initiative, debate, vote, action, deliberation, and discourse--though they are rarely acknowledged. This class will examine group dynamics as it is practiced in the field of organizational development (OD), a branch of organizational psychology used to implement cultural changes across social systems. The application of OD to politics is not widespread, but its tools are useful in understanding the dynamics in political situations and in the understanding of how power is exercised. The course will introduce concepts in open systems theory and will introduce three models to "hold the data" in our case studies: the Burke-Litwin Model, BART, and GRPI.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL210 Money and Social Change: Innovative Paradigms and Strategies

How do people make decisions about using their money for social change? Where will it have the most impact? When do shifts in the rules or the use of capital create systemic change and address structural inequities? This course will explore the role of capital in social change. If we rethink how social change happens--analyzing the nonprofit and public sectors, but also new sector-blending approaches and concepts like collective impact--how does our perspective on capital shift? As a part of this unique course, students will work through an active process of selecting a set of nonprofits in and around Middletown to which, as a class, they will actually grant a total of $10,000.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL211 Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Legal Advocacy for Disabled Veterans

The public rarely understands what it takes to fight for one's legal rights or benefits. Good writers can translate those battles in ways that teach, empower, and (re)build community support for struggling individuals. This course is a study in the translation of legal challenges into civic advocacy.

In this course, you will write about real plaintiffs and legal cases for public audiences. As part of your journey, you will delve into the military and medical files of a disabled veteran applying for a discharge upgrade from the military. Most discharge upgrade applicants suffer from addiction and/or mental health issues, the same issues that cut short the veterans' military careers. Using academic legal writing, news sources, and confidential personnel and medical files, you will describe issues facing veterans in general, and our veteran client specifically. You will write for a nonprofit website, a print newspaper, a podcast, the six o'clock news, and a local online news or social media outlet. Your writings will inform the instructor's writing--as the veteran's pro bono legal counsel--of a discharge upgrade brief.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL215 Human-Centered Design for Social Change

Design thinking is the way the creative mind approaches complex problem solving. Increasingly, it is at the center of innovative practices in business. Yet it can be particularly effective in addressing the human needs that are the focus of social enterprise and policy. This course will introduce a number of ways to understand how to use this method and will apply it to a number of real-world examples as team work in class. Invited designers who have worked in the field in the United States and in other countries will lead several sessions. An individual project will require fieldwork and will constitute the demonstration of mastery.

This course explores the techniques of human-centered design and design thinking for approaching social challenges ranging from election processes to subsistence challenges in impoverished rural populations. The most progressive and effective solutions to many problems are those that emerge from closely observing human patterns and then using creativity to make rapid prototypes of solutions that can be tested and refined. The result is human-centered, rather than high-level policy influences for social change. The class session will consist of (1) the presentation of methods and theories, (2) case studies to be worked on in teams either in the session or between sessions, and (3) discussions with designers who have worked on significant engagements for social change.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL217 Civil Rights Litigation Since 1978: A Practitioner's Perspective

This course will examine major themes in modern civil rights litigation in the United States between 1978 and 2020. The course will review major cases challenging police misconduct, school segregation and housing segregation, including exclusionary land use policies, sexual harassment, and bullying, as well as cases supporting voting and gay rights.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL220 Participatory Design: From Helping to Solidarity

As artists and designers increasingly turn their efforts to altering conditions for the vulnerable and oppressed, stubborn questions arise around the ethics of engagement. Socially engaged projects seek meaningful change, yet often discourage dissent, reify privilege, remain agnostic about outcomes, and do little to alter larger, structural inequalities. Artists and designers can easily exit projects deemed failures and write these off as learning experiences. Moving from one social injustice to the next, crises and suffering become "sites" from which to develop serialized projects. Armed with empathy and expertise, but with little local knowledge, these practitioners struggle to form equitable relationships with partners and collaborators. This course will examine a range of projects initiated by artists and designers and will challenge the idea that helping is beyond reproach. The course asks how artists and designers might better situate themselves as allies through developing practices that foster solidarity, exercise humility, and distribute agency.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL222 Disability Advocacy: Communicating the Legal Challenges of Disabled Plaintiffs to the Public

The public rarely understands what it takes to fight for one's legal rights or benefits. Good writers can translate those battles in ways that teach, empower, and (re)build community support for struggling individuals. This course is a study in the translation of legal challenges into civic advocacy.

In this course, students will write about real plaintiffs and legal cases for public audiences. In the first half of the course, students will read the military and medical files of a disabled veteran applying for a discharge upgrade from the military. Most discharge upgrade applicants suffer from addiction and/or mental health issues, the same issues that cut short the veterans' military careers. Using academic legal writing, news sources, and confidential personnel and medical files, students will describe issues facing veterans in general, and our veteran client, specifically. Students will write for a nonprofit website, a print newspaper, and a podcast, which the class will produce. These writings will inform the instructor's writing--as the veteran's pro bono legal counsel--of our client's discharge upgrade brief.

In the second half of the course, students will digest and synthesize legal pleadings from transgender disability suits (e.g., employment/Title VII, prison abuse). From these case files, students will write short pieces that educate the public about the lives and legal issues of transgender plaintiffs. Students will write for a nonprofit website, the six o'clock news, and a local online news or social media outlet.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL225 Critical Design Fictions

Design fiction involves the deliberate use of diegetic prototypes to suspend disbelief about change. Through practices of estrangement and defamiliarization, and through the use of carefully chosen design methods, this course experiments with the creation of provocative scenarios and imaginative artifacts that can help us envision different ways of inhabiting the world. The choices made by designers are ultimately choices about the kind of world in which we want to live--expressions of our dreams, fantasies, desires, and fears. As an integrated mode of thought and action, design is intrinsically social and deeply political. In conversation with science fiction, queer and feminist theories, indigenous discourses, drag and other performative interventions, this course explores speculative and critical approaches to design as catalysts for imagining alternate presents and possible futures. We examine a number of environmental and social issues related to climate change, incarceration, gender and reproductive rights, surveillance, emerging technologies, and labor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: SISP224
Prereq: None

CSPL230 State and Local Government

This course will cover the history of state and local government in America, the roles and functions of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches in state government, the interaction between federal, state, and local government institutions, state and local taxation and budget policies, the legislative process and how a bill becomes law in a state legislature, participation of the public in state and local government, as well as pertinent issues arising in state and local governments, with a focus on the Connecticut General Assembly.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL235 Activism and Theories of Change

In this course we will explore strategies and theories of change that shape social justice movements, with particular reference to recent movements in the United States. We will discuss the benefits and risks of the many available strategies including direct action, grassroots mobilization, impact litigation, legislative campaigns, electoral campaigns, artistic protest, and public education. When do they strengthen one another, and when do they collide? What ethical or moral questions are raised by various types of protest and communications? The instructor will draw on her own experiences as an activist for women's rights, queer rights, and economic justice. We will also consider the strategies of other recent movements such as Occupy, Black Lives Matter and gun safety activism, and we will allow time to discuss events that may occur in real time over the course of the semester. In recognition of the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage in the U.S., we will discuss the American women's suffrage movement with respect to its tactics, conflicts, failures and successes. This course will be relevant to students interested in public policy, feminism, gender and sexuality studies, and other social sciences, and will provide useful insight for future organizers and activists, lawyers, and public policy makers.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: FGSS236, AFAM235
Prereq: None

CSPL237 Communicate for Good: Public Speaking and Persuasion for Social Mobilization and Change

The world needs more...democracy, justice, equality, civility, love. Diagnosing that need is only the first step in changing society. To achieve social good, you must persuade your fellow citizens that the change is worthwhile and the path to change is worth it. In this public speaking and persuasion seminar, you will learn how to communicate for good. In the first half of the seminar, you will adopt the persona of a public organizer and develop mass media messages and public speeches to promote your public good. In the second half of the seminar, you will assume the mantel of leadership and produce a short speech and video storyboard for the leader of a nonprofit organization closely associated with your public good. In both halves of the course, you will be graded on your speech preparation and implementation (i.e., writing and speech).
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL239 Startup Incubator: The Art and Science of Launching Your Idea

The Startup Incubator is a one-semester, experiential learning program designed to teach and enable student entrepreneurs to develop sustainable business models from their ideas.

The program will bring together an ambitious, committed, and diverse group of individuals from all classes and majors who are passionate about developing successful solutions to challenges; identify as entrepreneurs, disruptors, and thought leaders; and have the tenacity, work ethic, and ability to succeed. All participating students should have a promising business idea and take the course with the intention of launching or running their own venture.

Student Incubator students actively participate in one cohort meeting a week: most are "classes" that take the form of lectures or workshops, and some are "practice days" that provide time to practice theories and methods necessary for success. Students also dedicate at least 10 additional hours per week to assignments, self-directed work, customer discovery, networking, and mentoring sessions.

This course will feel like a combination of a college class and a rigorous startup incubator program. Success is a student using theories learned in class to validate their ideas by developing and accurately testing business assumptions, identifying and researching their target market, and pivoting to develop a sustainable business model.

By enrolling, students make a commitment to themselves, the instructor, and the other members of the class.

Note: This course is offered by the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship (wesleyan.edu/patricelli/) and reSET (resetco.org/about/), a Hartford-based nonprofit whose mission is to advance the social enterprise sector, with support from CTNext (ctnext.com/higher-education/). Classes will be taught by reSET staff, and additional advising and coaching will be available through the Patricelli Center.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL240 Nonprofits and Social Change

This course explores the world of nonprofits and how they help (or don't help) the process of social change. As nonprofits increasingly address issues and concerns that governments have previously addressed, a critical analysis of how and why they carry out their work is central to the Allbritton Center's concern with public life. Each class session will include (1) background on a particular social issue (including global health, inner-city education, clean water, hunger, refugees, and national borders); (2) a case study of a nonprofit addressing that issue; and (3) discussion with leaders of that nonprofit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

CSPL244 From Litigation to Restorative Justice: Conflict Resolution in Practice

Litigation, mediation, reconciliation, and consciousness-raising. These and other techniques can help us solve seemingly intractable conflicts. But how does a litigator, mediator, reconciler, or consciousness-raiser select an appropriate strategy for a given conflict? And once a strategy is selected, how does a conflict resolution specialist lead the parties to resolution? This course will show you the way...

In the first part of this course, we will study and practice traditional dispute resolution techniques. Each student will participate in two-person and multi-party quasi-judicial role-playing exercises and arbitrations. In the second part of the course, we will study and practice mediation, reconciliation, feminist consciousness-raising, and community-building.

We will then draw upon theory and practice readings, and our experiences, to answer questions such as: Should we match dispute resolution strategies to parties' personalities or desired outcomes? Whose conception of fairness and social good should guide our negotiation practices? Are dispute resolution techniques gendered, raced, aged, abled, etc.? We will answer some of these questions with the help of other Wesleyan students at a conflict resolution teach-in led by members of the class.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL245 Ethnography and Design

Exercising humility and developing methods of meaningful engagement are essential to becoming an effective ethnographer and designer. Collaboration with users provides knowledge that allows designers to imagine artifacts, places, and systems that are thoughtfully enhanced or radically new. This course rethinks power dynamics to better understand how to design both for and with other people. With successful completion of this course students will be able to demonstrate competence in developing, refining, and communicating research interests in a committed, reflexive manner. They will gain an understanding of the strategic and tactical value of design and a sense of the practical problems involved in realizing design solutions and responses that are attuned to the needs of both an institution and individual users. Students will gain experience not only in theoretically framing social and political issues as these are expressed through design, but also in understanding the methodological tools needed to translate problems into creative interventions that are user-centered and compassionate.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-SISP
Identical With: SISP245
Prereq: None

CSPL250 An Introduction to Data Journalism

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic principles and tools of data journalism and to provide a wider understanding of the role of basic data analysis in society. To that end, the course will focus on developing a solid familiarity with basic data analysis and visualization software. It will also focus on developing the tools of journalism: retrieving public data, interviewing people and databases, and the basic principles of journalistic writing. By the end of the course, students will be able to analyze data, identify stories within the data, and create a news story complete with data visualizations of publishable quality--a skill transferable to many fields and disciplines. Both online and traditional print platforms will be covered.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-QAC
Identical With: QAC250, WRCT250
Prereq: None

CSPL250D Topics in Journalism: Writing (and Arguing) About Inequality: How to Make Your Case

In this nonfiction seminar, students will explore how to write about social issues by identifying inequity, understanding the logic and rhetoric used to both defend and criticize it, and developing their own skills to effectively communicate their opinion. Modeled after journalistic work, the course will also develop students' abilities to conduct first-person research and observation and then translate them into written form for use in nonfiction. We will also explore questions of authenticity, voice, and dominant narrative, allowing students to examine what it means to write about communities other than their own--and the issues implicit in doing that work. Work from across the political spectrum will be addressed.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT250D
Prereq: None

CSPL250G Topics in Journalism: Literary Journalism

In this course, we will explore the art and craft of magazine-length journalism that strives to do something different than reporting the news--it aspires to achieve the goals of literature. While this kind of writing tends to be timely, as almost all journalism must be when it's first published, at its best, it ought to be worth reading for decades to come. Truman Capote, for example, conceived of IN COLD BLOOD, which he first published as a series of articles in THE NEW YORKER in 1965, as a "non-fiction novel": a work of journalism that employed the techniques and artistry of fiction. We will study the writing of new journalists such as Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, Nora Ephron, and Gay Talese, who pioneered the idea that there is no such thing as unbiased reporting: The writer can't help but bring a point of view to his or her storytelling, so why not admit it? These writers broke with journalistic convention and admitted that there was an "I" behind the typewriter, a mediator between the "true" story and the reader. We will focus on reading and writing two forms in particular, the profile and the essay. While an excellent profile can be a straightforward examination of another person and his or her place in the world, in the hands of a master like Janet Malcolm or George Trow, it can become an eruption of invention. Essays ask a question or argue a point--but how? There are as many ways as there are writers who explore the form, and in this course we will seek to join them.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT250G
Prereq: None

CSPL250H Topics in Journalism: Writing Op-Ed Pieces and Political Essays

This course offers practice in writing op-eds and political essays in short and long forms. This class may be of interest not only to writers but also to students studying political science, history, economics, ethics, sociology, or an interdisciplinary field, such as American studies. The main goal of this class is teaching students how to engage in debate in the public sphere over the major themes and issues of our time. Other than an intense reading schedule and a writing workshop, the other major component will be guest speakers. They include journalist, essayists, and scholars working in their fields but with an authoritative presence in the public sphere.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT250H
Prereq: None

CSPL250J Topics in Journalism: Literary Journalism

In this course, we will explore the art and craft of magazine-length journalism that strives to do something different than reporting the news--it aspires to achieve the goals of literature. While this kind of writing tends to be timely, as almost all journalism must be when it's first published, at its best, it ought to be worth reading for decades to come. Truman Capote, for example, conceived of IN COLD BLOOD, which he first published as a series of articles in THE NEW YORKER in 1965, as a "non-fiction novel": a work of journalism that employed the techniques and artistry of fiction. We will study the writing of new journalists such as Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, Nora Ephron, and Gay Talese, who pioneered the idea that there is no such thing as unbiased reporting: The writer can't help but bring a point of view to his or her storytelling, so why not admit it? These writers broke with journalistic convention and admitted that there was an "I" behind the typewriter, a mediator between the "true" story and the reader. We will focus on reading and writing two forms in particular, the profile and the essay. While an excellent profile can be a straightforward examination of another person and his or her place in the world, in the hands of a master like Janet Malcolm or George Trow, it can become an eruption of invention. Essays ask a question or argue a point--but how? There are as many ways as there are writers who explore the form, and in this course we will seek to join them. The course will be taught by Steve Almond, the 2016--17 Koeppel Journalism Fellow. He has been an investigative journalist in Miami and El Paso and is an award-winning writer of nonfiction and fiction. He is the author of eight books, including several New York Times bestsellers, and is currently teaching narrative journalism at the Nieman Foundation at Harvard.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT250J
Prereq: None

CSPL250K Topics in Journalism: Writing, Wit, and the Natural World

This course will engage students as readers and writers of essays, opinion pieces, and long-form articles about the natural world. We live in the shadow of climate change and the sixth great extinction event. So when is outrage effective, and when does wit or irony allow a writer to find a more persuasive voice? What's the role of objectivity in a world where everybody seems to be shouting? We will consider the work of such writers as Gerald Durell, David Quammen, Elizabeth Kolbert, and Peter Matthiessen. Students will also write regularly and collaborate together in class to critique and improve one another's work.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT250K
Prereq: None

CSPL250M Topics in Journalism: Storytelling and Social Change

How did a TV show help reduce the rate of teen pregnancy to the lowest point in recorded history? Why did a new narrative approach to gay marriage enable the movement to go from losing 31 state referendums to suddenly winning? Storytelling, across mediums and social platforms, has the power to change behavior and shift the cultural narrative. This class will explore the nature of "effective" stories, across a wide variety of issues, that engage audiences and often prompt action. We will discuss how this process works and ways to develop social impact campaigns. Students will have the chance to question some of the leading creators/practitioners who will join as guest speakers.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT250M
Prereq: None

CSPL250N Writing Reality: Journalism in an Era of Polarization and "Fake News"

How should the news media cover Donald Trump? How did the Internet, the 24-hour news cycle, and rising polarization help change the nature of journalism itself, but also lead to an era of "Fake News" accusations in which Americans exposed to different sources of information come away with completely different sets of facts? This class will explore our new digital and highly partisan media landscape, grounded in a close study of current events. We will study the impact and consequences of today's media -- both how to consume it, and how to write for it.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT250N
Prereq: None

CSPL250P "It's a Mess": An Academic and Practical Look at Digital Media in the Late 2010s

Hot mess. Dumpster fire. Steaming turd pile. Commentators, journalists, and the public have all used these terms to describe the state of American digital media in 2018. While the profession of journalism is more noble in this era than in previous decades, the world of media creation and consumption is far more complicated than ever before. For young people hoping to get their start in the world of digital media in the late 2010s, catching a break is even harder.

The purpose of this class is twofold: It will introduce students to the larger issues spanning digital media--from a lack of diversity and inclusion to problems with monetization and "Fake News"--while also giving them the chance to walk through what it's actually like to pitch, write, and edit for an internet publication. Students will have the opportunity to write for a class blog using strategies that the digital media world uses today, and they'll spend time giving and receiving feedback on writing.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: WRCT250P
Prereq: None

CSPL250R First Person Singular

This course will examine the techniques and skills of first person reportage, where the writer is present and part of the story. We will find and hone your own voices and points of view. We will examine the myth of objectivity; issues of fairness, accuracy, and moral relativity; the perils of cultural appropriation; the savior complex; and exoticism.

The course will include several short essays and one longer final project. It will draw on readings from The London Review of Books, The New York Times magazine, National Geographic magazine, Granta, Paris Review, The New Yorker, and the following authors: Lyn Freed, Rian Malan, Jonny Steinberg, Doris Lessing, Ryszard Kapuscinski, W.G. Sebold, Bruce Chatwin, VS Naipaul, Justice Malala, George Orwell, Zawe Ashton, Julian Sayararer, Cathy Renzenbrink, Sisonke Msimang, Thomas Paige McBee, Ahmet Altan, and Peter Godwin.

This course is offered by 2019 Koeppel Journalism Fellow, Peter Godwin. He is the author of five nonfiction books and is an award-winning journalist, war correspondent, and documentary filmmaker. Godwin's bio can be found here: https://petergodwin.com/about/
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Identical With: WRCT250R
Prereq: None

CSPL257 System Mapping for Social and Environmental Impact

In recent years, growing interest in social entrepreneurship has pushed students to "solve" complex social and environmental problems with new ventures of their own design. Unfortunately, this approach often overlooks a critical foundation of social change: understanding the root causes of problems and the contexts that surround them before seeking solutions.

In this six-week, half-credit class, students will study a problem and the systems that surround it. By the end of the course, students will create a "systems map" that documents the economic, political, and cultural factors behind their problem, as well as the current "solutions landscape."
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: AFAM257, ENVS208
Prereq: None

CSPL262 Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship

In this project-based, cohort-style class, students will learn strategies for understanding social and environmental problems, and they will design interventions to create impact. Each student will select a topic to work on individually or as part of a team throughout the semester. Topics will include root cause analysis, ecosystem mapping, theory of change, human-centered design, business models, leadership and teamwork, impact metrics, storytelling, and more. Some students will develop entrepreneurial projects and ventures while others will find pathways to impact as activists, community organizers, coalition builders, artists, researchers, and more.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL263 Refugees in World Politics

The primary objective of this course is to provide students with i) an introductory overview of the political, economic, social, and security determinants of refugee flows; and ii) the political and social responses of receiving governments and societies to them. Using both historical and contemporary case studies, this course will highlight security concerns engendered by internal displacement and transnational migration. These include armed conflict, smuggling, trafficking, and terrorism. This course will also highlight the concepts of citizenship in receiving states, and the roles played by the international institutions in influencing state policies towards refugees.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: GOVT323
Prereq: None

CSPL264 Patricelli Center Fellowship I

The Patricelli Center Fellowship is a one-year, project-based, cohort-style learning experience. Fellows are a self-selected, committed, and diverse cohort of individuals or teams from all classes and majors who are passionate about innovation, creativity, and problem-solving; identify as entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs, changemakers, activists, disruptors, designers, inventors, and/or thought leaders; and have tenacity, empathy, interdisciplinary thinking, strong work ethic, and the ability to work independently. Some Fellows will launch or run their own project or venture, while others will not.

Patricelli Center Fellows actively participate in two cohort meetings per week: some are "classes" that take the form of lectures or workshops, and some are "labs" that serve as working or discussion sessions. Fellows also dedicate 10+ additional hours per week to assignments, self-directed work, portfolio-building, and engaging other members of the Wesleyan community.

This course will feel like a combination of a Wesleyan class, a C-level position on a startup team, and an extra-curricular leadership activity. By enrolling, Fellows make a commitment to themselves, the instructor, and the other members of their cohort.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL265 Patricelli Center Fellowship II

The Patricelli Center Fellowship is a one-year, project-based, cohort-style learning experience. Fellows are a self-selected, committed, and diverse cohort of individuals or teams from all classes and majors who are passionate about innovation, creativity, and problem-solving; identify as entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs, changemakers, activists, disruptors, designers, inventors, and/or thought leaders; and have tenacity, empathy, interdisciplinary thinking, strong work ethic, and the ability to work independently. Some Fellows will launch or run their own project or venture, while others will not.

Patricelli Center Fellows actively participate in two cohort meetings per week: some are "classes" that take the form of lectures or workshops, and some are "labs" that serve as working or discussion sessions. Fellows also dedicate 10+ additional hours per week to assignments, self-directed work, portfolio-building, and engaging other members of the Wesleyan community.

This course will feel like a combination of a Wesleyan class, a C-level position on a startup team, and an extra-curricular leadership activity. By enrolling, Fellows make a commitment to themselves, the instructor, and the other members of their cohort.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: CSPL264

CSPL266 Youth, Power, and Social Change

While young people have been at the helm of movements for social and racial justice throughout history, the 1990s saw the rise of youth organizing as an intentional strategy for transforming youth, communities, and the broader social and political structures and institutions that shape their lives. This course will examine the evolution of youth organizing and the ways in which it has disrupted the dominant narratives and traditional methods of youth learning and engagement at play in schools and youth service organizations. The course will explore the politics of power and identity in youth work, and the role and impact of current youth-led social change movements - from #blacklivesmatter to the work of Dreamers - in today's political climate. Please note that this course will require students to reflect on and contextualize readings and class discussion with their own lived experience and is therefore especially relevant for students that are engaged in community service, organizing and/or youth work.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL267 Project-Based Learning Lab

In this course, students will bring ideas to life through project-based learning, translating theory to practice and developing a more sophisticated understanding of subjects they are studying in their other courses.

Students will enroll in the Project-Based Learning Lab with a problem they want to address or an idea they want to build. Throughout the semester, we will build a toolbox for studying problems and designing solutions. Themes will include systems thinking, root cause analysis, ethical community research, human-centered design, lean prototyping, and data-driven evaluation. There will be an emphasis on humility, teamwork, oral communication, responsible partnership, and lean experimentation. Most students will complete the semester having launched a basic MVP (minimum viable product) and a road map for continuing to pursue their idea after the conclusion of the semester.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL269 Race, Incarceration, and Citizenship: The New Haven Model

This course will explore the elements of local responses to contemporary criminal justice issues, drawing on current research projects in New Haven, Connecticut. The course will explore a variety of promising practices, which emphasize community engagement and individual citizenship over incarceration and punishment. Topics will include evidence-based practices to reduce criminal recidivism, mental health issues in the criminal justice system, treatment engagement, and the creation of valued roles in the community. Students will have the opportunity to participate in federal research studies.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AFAM
Identical With: AFAM269, ANTH269
Prereq: None

CSPL277 Community Impact: Building Capacity to Support Educational Enrichment and Socioemotional Development

In this half-credit course, students will build an intellectual and practical framework to guide their work in volunteer settings in the local community. What does it mean to "help?" How do we assess the needs of community partners and build the knowledge and skills that will allow us to address those needs? What do we need to know and understand about the people with whom we work? What does research have to say about effective tutoring techniques and practices? How can we design meaningful learning experiences? How can we maximize not only our impact in the community, but our own growth and learning?

Note: students taking this course must be engaged in at least 80 minutes per week of community service in an educational setting throughout the semester and must complete this questionnaire ( https://forms.gle/ay9xaXGn1wbxriHJ7) before enrolling
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL280 Nonprofit Boards: Theory and Practice I

Nonprofit Boards: Theory and Practice supports students in their learning about the nonprofit sector (its role in society, the challenges it confronts, and the primary roles and responsibilities of nonprofit boards) via class meetings/discussions, a residency with a local nonprofit, and student support of a project assigned by a partnering organization.
Offering: Host
Grading: BMS
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL281 Nonprofit Boards: Theory and Practice II

Nonprofit Boards: Theory and Practice supports students in their learning about the nonprofit sector (its role in society, the challenges it confronts, and the primary roles and responsibilities of nonprofit boards) via class meetings/discussions, a residency with a local nonprofit, and student support of a project assigned by a partnering organization.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL300 Integrative Learning Project 2: Senior Capstone

The Integrative Learning Project is a .50 credit course that allows students to learn to describe in a coherent and engaging narrative the various academic and non-academic activities, projects, and experiences that have been important for them while in college and to practice doing so for a variety of audiences (e.g. employers, graduate schools, etc.). Participants should be students who are interested in crafting a narrative about their personal and intellectual development, and who want to be able to talk about what skills they have cultivated during their time at Wesleyan and what they still want to learn.

This course is intended for seniors who wish to document and reflect about their work in a single "capstone" experience. This course requires a willingness to discuss one's strengths, achievements, weaknesses, and failures. Students will not only engage in reflection about their skills and experiences, but will also have the opportunity to design an online portfolio in WordPress, the world┬┐s most popular content management software, and test the portfolio with different audiences by employing user experience design (UX) principles and research methodologies. Students can only take this course once.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: None
Identical With: WRCT300, RL&L350, AFAM320
Prereq: None

CSPL302 Senior Seminar for Civic Engagement Certificate

In this partial-credit seminar, the candidates for the Civic Engagement Certificate will acquaint each other with their particular interests in and commitments to civic engagement. Under close faculty supervision, the participants will organize the course as a collaborative undertaking. Meeting biweekly, they will revisit the readings from the Foundations of Civic Engagement (CSPL201) course, discussing them in light of their subsequent course work and practical experiences in engagement. At the end of the semester, each student will make a formal presentation to the group, the faculty sponsors of the certificate, and invited guests.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.25
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: CSPL201

CSPL307 Religious Subjects to Ethnic Minorities: Armenians in Turkey Between Empire and Republic

After World War I, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points articulated a new vision for an international order based not on imperial ambition but on the self-determination of nations. Though empire persisted as a viable political form through the Second World War, the interwar years saw the breakup of some of the world's oldest dynastic empires into the much newer nation-state: the Austro-Hungarian Hapsburg Empire, the Ottoman Empire, and Imperial Russia all gave way to new political entities. At the same time, a transformation in the idea of political belonging occurred: citizenship now dominated the older concept of imperial subjects, and an idea of a national minority protected by an international regime of minority rights emerged. These ideas profoundly reshaped national and international politics.

This course focuses on the Armenians of Turkey across the transition from the Ottoman Empire to the Republic of Turkey, established in 1923. It uses the Armenians of Turkey as a case study in the emergence of secular nationalism as the dominant political ideal of the 20th century. Students will not only learn the history of the late Ottoman Empire, the Republic of Turkey, and the history of the Armenian minority in the Middle East, but will explore the transition from empire to republic at the end of the 19th century through the twin lenses of secularism and nationalism. Drawing on Ottoman and Turkish history, Armenian history, political science, and anthropology, the course introduces debates about nationalism, secularism, minority rights, and political belonging through the emphasis on Armenians in Turkey.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL315 Policy and War through Film

This course explores how America's policies and wars interact with culture and identity. It combines films and readings to gain a deeper understanding of film as an artifact of culture, war, and identity. The course begins with a discussion of key foundational works to frame a common understanding about strategy, war, and American strategic culture. It then combines film viewings and critical scholarship to discover how the interpretations of America's wars through film shape American citizens' perceptions of war and their military. The films, readings, and seminar discussions will help students develop a better understanding of the differences between the realities and the perceptions of policy and war. This course lies at the intersection of international relations, history, and conflict studies. Participation in this course will increase the students' understanding of how U.S. policy, war, culture, and identity interact. It will also sharpen critical thinking and writing.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: GOVT315
Prereq: None

CSPL316 Human Rights Advocacy: Critical Assessment and Practical Engagement in Global Social Justice

The core animating principles and practices of human rights are under threat. Will the global human rights movement be able to respond effectively? How could or should the movement advance the cause of global social justice most effectively? This seminar seeks to answer these questions by assessing global rights defense and social justice practice and by engaging in structured, self-critical human rights advocacy.

Among the issues considered in this seminar will be the following: What are the origins of the human rights movement? Has the movement been dominated by ideas from the West and elite organizations from the Global North? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What is the role of documentation, legal advocacy, and social media in human rights advocacy? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in rights promotion and defense?

Students will be required to write several short reflection papers. The final project will be an exercise in developing a human rights advocacy project or supervised engagement in actual human rights advocacy in conjunction with the University Network for Human Rights (humanrightsnetwork.org).
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: GOVT396
Prereq: None

CSPL317 Social and Political Perspectives on Digital Media

This course examines the intersection between social media, politics, and society, analyzing platforms like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram to understand their role in our lives, in our political discourse and in shaping our culture. We examine the positives of social media including social activism, the democratization of news, and heightened capacities for community, communication, and connectivity. We also delve into the darker side of these platforms, exploring the proliferation of fake news, hate speech, terrorist networks, and gendered issues including trolling and cyber harassment. This is an interdisciplinary course and in it we will draw upon a broad range of social theories including science and technology studies, communication theory, linguistics, cultural studies, and media studies to understand the complex role of digital media in contemporary society.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL317Z Social and Political Perspectives on Digital Media

This course examines the intersection between social media, politics, and society, analyzing platforms like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram to understand their role in our lives, in our political discourse and in shaping our culture. We examine the positives of social media including social activism, the democratization of news, and heightened capacities for community, communication, and connectivity. We also delve into the darker side of these platforms, exploring the proliferation of fake news, hate speech, terrorist networks, and gendered issues including trolling and cyber harassment. This is an interdisciplinary course and in it we will draw upon a broad range of social theories including science and technology studies, communication theory, linguistics, cultural studies, and media studies to understand the complex role of digital media in contemporary society.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL318 Global Populism and the US Election. Are we witnessing a populism uprising?

In this course, we will unpack the factors pushing communities worldwide toward these political ideologies as well as the impact it has on global politics and international relations. We'll take a deep dive into the 2020 campaign cycle in the age of digital campaigning and online voting and analyze how Donald Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders are shaping our political discourse and how they fit into the global trend of populism. We'll study the defeat of democratic movements like the Arab Spring and the rise of authoritarian regimes in the region. Additionally, we'll break down how the failure of democratic movements in the MENA region led to the refugee crisis, which in turn inspired right-wing radicalization within Europe and the United States. This course provides an overview of the political landscape of the populism movements in the U.S. and around the world, focusing on the collapse of democratic movements and the rise of populist leaders like Donald Trump, Boris Johnson, Narendra Modi, Jair Bolsonaro, and Marine Le Pen, among others. We'll begin with a brief overview of the history of populism and the theory behind it, before breaking down modern applications.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL319 The Voice(s) of Expertise: How Podcasting Is Changing the Way We Listen and Learn

In this course, students will examine the changing nature of audio news and storytelling, and the extent to which traditional understanding of the voice of expertise is being disrupted by the rise of podcasting and other on-demand audio forms. The evolving digital media landscape has brought about an historic shift in the delivery of news and information. The shift has been celebrated--"the media has been democratized"--and reviled--"the media is too fractured and people are living in information bubbles." The shift is, at the very least, unsettling, in particular for journalists who find themselves working in an environment where the old rules and training seem outdated. But it also presents significant opportunities, especially in audio and broadcast journalism. The rise of podcasting, in particular, may challenge norms on how journalists explore and explain complex issues, and on who we hear as voices of expertise. This course will be a combination of media criticism, a study of best practices in journalism, and design thinking. As students examine the impact of new media on news and journalism, they will also develop their own ideas for on-demand audio (including podcast design) throughout the semester, both on their own and in collaboration with other students.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: WRCT250V
Prereq: None

CSPL320 Collaborative Cluster Initiative Research Seminar I

This course will supplement the seminars providing historical and cultural background of the prison system in the United States. The emphasis will be on the practical application of topics engaged in the other seminars and contemporary concerns related to the prison system in the United States. We will follow current debates at both the national and state level, including legislation, media, and university initiatives. Students will also visit local sites. Speakers will visit the class to share their experiences and expertise. Students will conduct individual research projects and present them in workshop fashion.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL321 Collaborative Cluster Initiative Research Seminar II

Students participating in the Collaborative Cluster Initiative will take this course in the spring semester. They will continue with projects started in the fall semester. This is a continuation of CSPL320.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL323 Human Rights: Contemporary Challenges

This course will examine various pressing challenges to human rights in the US and around the world, based around a series of talks by visitors who are practitioners in the field. Topics covered range from refugees and war crimes to housing and educational access.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: GOVT283
Prereq: None

CSPL328 Advanced Human Rights Advocacy

This course will enable students to engage in critical assessment of human rights advocacy while participating directly in projects through the University Network for Human Rights. Students in Professor Cavallaro's Fall CSPL 316 course are encouraged to apply, as are other students interested in gaining practical experience in human rights. The course will involve seminar discussions and readings that assess the strengths, weaknesses, and challenges facing the human rights movement domestically and internationally. In addition, students will be responsible for project-based work guided by Professor Cavallaro and the team of supervisors at the University Network for Human Rights.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL330 Policy and Strategy in War and Peace

This course explores how the relations, relationships, and discourse between senior national civilian and military leaders influence the development and execution of policy and strategy in war and peace. In theory, the purpose of war is to achieve a political end that sees a better peace. In practice, the nature of war is to serve itself if it is not influenced and constrained by continuous discourse and analysis associated with good civil-military relations between senior leaders. This course begins with discussion of the key foundational works to build a common understanding. It then explores how civil-military interaction influenced strategy in war and peace for each decade from the Vietnam War to the present. The readings and seminar discussions also examine how the outcomes of wars influenced civil-military relations and the subsequent peace or wars. This course lies at the intersection of international relations, history, and conflict studies. Students will gain greater understanding of how U.S. policy makers, strategy, and war interact, while honing their critical thinking and writing skills.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Identical With: GOVT330
Prereq: None

CSPL332 Just Cities: Architectures of Public Encounter

What is "the public," and how has it been conceived, relative to notions of the urban--to the web of ideas, forms, and fantasies constituting "the city"? Can art and architecture play a role in defining the public, or does the public's political and social construction place it outside the scope of specifically aesthetic concerns? This course addresses these and other related questions, positioning art and architecture in their broader cultural and historical contexts. It explores a range of socially charged, experiential, and participatory aesthetic and political practices, characterized by their distinctly public character and decidedly architectural and urban settings. At its core, it is concerned with issues of social justice as they relate to the material spaces of the modern city, and the manner in which those spaces are identified, codified, and made operative in the service of aesthetic, social, and political experience.

This course will be taught by M. Surry Schlabs, Yale School of Architecture.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: ARHA257
Prereq: None

CSPL333 Music Movements in a Capitalist Democracy

This course will focus on music movements that have used the presentation, expression, and production of music and music events to facilitate sociopolitico transitions. The vital context of these movements is the United States in particular, where the speed and power of commerce, as well as the concentration of capital, present unique opportunities for progressive values and goals in music.

We will look at huge events such as the Newport festivals, Woodstock, Michigan Womyn's Music Festival, Lillith Fair, and Bonaroo, and examine how these movements have both evolved and spread their tendrils into the world (if they have). We will also spend some time on smaller, grassroots venues and music series in Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, and New York and see how blues, folk, punk, and "Americana" venues have affected and interacted with their communities. We will look at how music scenes evolved and grew and sometimes became institutions, like the Chicago Old Town School of Music.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL337 Practicing Democracy

Organizing can make a difference in addressing major public challenges that require civic action, especially by those whose voices will lead, by identifying, recruiting, and developing more leadership; building community around that leadership; and building power from the resources of that community. In this course, each student accepts responsibility for organizing constituents to achieve an outcome by the end of the semester. As reflective practitioners, students learn from critical analysis of their leadership of this campaign. We focus on five key practices: turning values into motivated action through narrative; building relationships committed to common purpose; structuring leadership collaboratively; strategizing to turn resources into the power to achieve outcomes; and turning commitments into measurable action enabling learning, accountability, and adaption.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL341A Topics in Education, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship: Transformative Practices in School Reforms

This seminar provides students the opportunity to explore critical topics within the school reform movement; be introduced to perspectives from a diverse group of stakeholders (e.g., CEOs, administrators, lawyers, parents, students, authors, scholars); work closely with the professor to further investigate one of the course topics in-depth, and present/disseminate their own conclusions and recommendations to an external audience.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL341B Topics in Education, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship: Social Entreprenurship in Education

This seminar focuses upon educational innovation and entrepreneurship as a form of social entrepreneurship, some of society's greatest challenges in education. Students will survey critical issues in contemporary education and explore innovative and entrepreneurial efforts to address these issues. Learners will explore how diverse education startups, non-profit organizations, and non-governmental organizations, individuals and grassroots groups, K-12 schools, universities, foundations, professional associations and others are responding to these issues in innovative ways. As the course progresses, students will explore the roles of foundations, corporations, and government policies and regulations upon educational innovation and entrepreneurship. As part of this course, learners will work individually or in groups to research solutions to a pressing contemporary educational challenge and propose or pitch a means of addressing that challenge through social entrepreneurship.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL341C Entrepreneurship in Education: Past, Present, and Future

Entrepreneurship plays an increasingly important role in the American public education system. This course examines the historic roots of entrepreneurship in education, looking at both the business side of entrepreneurism and the more recent emergence of social entrepreneurship. Furthermore, the course examines the current debates in the United States about the engagement of business with education, addressing such concerns as the proper role of risk, profit motives, privatization, and neoliberalism. The New Orleans public school system will serve as a case study for investigation in this discussion. Students will better understand the entrepreneurial personality, the sources of innovation, and the promise and pitfalls of entrepreneurism in public K-12 schooling.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL341D Topics in Education, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship: A Law and Policy Perspective

Entrepreneurial ideas in education invariably raise rich questions of policy and law. Innovations in the public schools, such as charter schools, the use of student test scores (e.g., value added modeling) to evaluate teachers, and alternative pathways to the profession (e.g., Teach for America) engender deep debate and discussion in policy and legal circles. This course will explore (from both a law and policy lens) the various education reform ideas that have been instituted or debated and characterized as innovative or entrepreneurial. The course material will be framed in a way to be accessible to those with a general interest in the area of education but without a background in law and policy per se. The course will draw heavily from guest lecturers and entrepreneurs working in the field.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CSPL
Prereq: None

CSPL341E Topics in Education: Introduction to Educational Law, Policy, and Educational Reform

This seminar examines how constitutions, statutes, and court cases impact the rights of students and faculty in K-12 education. It also examines how parents and students have used the law to advocate for equal educational opportunity. Finally, this seminar discusses the legal dimension of education reform measures, such as charter schools and school vouchers.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL341G Case Studies in Educational Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship, innovation, and reform are a defining part of the fabric of K-12 education in the US and other places, presenting opportunities and risks. Each week we will be visited by one or more experts who have led or studied innovative or entrepreneurial projects in the education sector. Perspectives and cases to be discussed include the founding of schools and businesses, start-up ventures, social entrepreneurship and nonprofit organizations, educational law and policy, and innovation within public schools and districts. Students will learn from conversations with experts in the field about how to define problems in education, how different people have approached solutions to these problems, and lessons learned. The professor and students will work together to draw connections between the various case studies and to articulate larger principles.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: EDST341G
Prereq: None

CSPL357Z Saving the Republic: Lessons from Plato for our Time

In this service-learning course, students will use video to launch discussions of election 2020 issues in class and throughout the Middletown community. Our jumping-off point is Plato's "Republic." More than 2,000 years ago, Plato addressed the pressing issues of the day: the rise of the oligarchy, dwindling of public deliberation, increasing political factionalism, and erosion of credible information. Some argue that the lessons of his Socratic exchanges, captured in "Republic," are valuable to this day. In this course, students will immerse themselves in 403 B.C.E., a crucial moment in Athenian democracy. Following a close reading of "Republic," we will recreate the Athenian state online. Each member of the class will assume a particular place in Athenian society and in the factions of the day using highly-developed roles from the Reacting to the Past curriculum. As members of a gathered assembly, students will debate divisive issues such as citizenship, elections, re-militarization, and the political process. Then, students will develop, rehearse, and record videos about the "Republic" for the Russell Library in Middletown. Students will be assessed in six ways: 1. Content quizzes on "The Republic," 2. Written preparation for debates/assemblies, 3. Oral presentations in debates/assemblies, 4. Contribution to the class videos, 5. A short paper analyzing "The Republic"'s relevance for the United States, particularly the 2020 election, and 6. Short reflections on our partnership with the Russell Library. No previous experience in videography or theater are necessary. Students will be encouraged to use their own skills in music, art, and drama as they devise ways to use the arts as catalysts for individual and social transformation. This course will be taught remotely/online in a mostly asynchronous format.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: GOVT357Z
Prereq: None

CSPL366 A History of Incarceration in the United States

This course examines the history of incarceration in the United States from the 18th century to the late 20th century. It begins with history of indentured servitude in the colonial era and then considers the intensification of the enslavement of blacks in the 19th century as well as the expansion of prisons in the 20th century. The course seeks to engage how systems of confinement accompanied the development of a political system based on the languages of liberty.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST366
Prereq: None

CSPL368 Incarceration and American Literature

This course offers a consideration of the image of imprisonment in American literary and cultural expression and its relation to the history of corrections and criminal justice in the United States and to prominent ideas about democracy, freedom, and citizenship.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL368
Prereq: None

CSPL375 Posse Veterans Introduction to Student Life and Community

Purpose of this seminar is to develop presentation and group discussion skills: to integrate students into Wesleyan student life; and to familiarize students with the range of study programs and community programs at Wesleyan. It will introduce a host of topics and staff to stimulate discourse and improve veteran student knowledge of the full gamut of opportunities, service, and resources available at Wesleyan. It meets one/week for an hour.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.25
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

CSPL390 Connecticut's Industrial Heritage

The aim of this course is to give students a better understanding of the historical industrial merits and legacy of Connecticut while considering the value and challenges of its physical and interpretive remains. While focusing on New Haven, students will be challenged to discover and synthesize Middletown's historically chief industries, industrialists, inventions, workforce, and remaining factory sites. Professor Caplan brings his experience as a Historical Architect, historian, genealogist, author, National Register consultant, and tour operator to provide students with a well-rounded understanding of how history, preservation, architecture, social science, and environmental justice come together in actual projects.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Identical With: HIST389
Prereq: None

CSPL397 Human Rights and the 2020 Elections

This seminar will examine the principal candidates for the presidency (and selected candidates for other major electoral positions) from the perspective of human rights. To begin, we will spend the first several weeks studying basic human rights standards, as well as the challenges to the promotion of international human rights standards in the United States. We will then turn to particular rights and clusters of rights, considering the policies proposed by various candidates and their implications for human rights. After review of the particular right or cluster of rights, students will work in small groups to research and present the proposals of the various candidates to the class. In addition, representatives of the candidates will be invited to engage with the class (as well as in broader fora on campus).
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL399 Understanding the 2020 Presidential Election

In understanding the 2020 Presidential Election, students will learn how to read skeptically the political press and how to write critically about presidential campaign politics. Along the way, the course will touch on electoral history, political and social thought, public policy, media criticism, and much more. Students will read past examples of thought-provoking and influential commentary. They will read current coverage in the legacy press of the 2020 presidential election and come to class prepared to discuss the most important stories and issues of the week. Students will have the opportunity to learn about electoral politics and political writing alongside a veteran journalist. Students who have experience working for political campaigns will have a chance to share their knowledge and help the class incorporate their experience in a larger historical framework. They will have a chance to see their work published in the Editorial Board, the lecturer's daily politics newsletter. Students will attempt to do what political writers do in real-time: explain what's happening from a unique, particular, and informed point of view for the benefit of like-minded citizens seeking to achieve the ideal of self-government. In the end, the hope is that students see that campaign politics is simpler and more complex than it appears, but that neither is obvious without study, focus, and understanding.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL399Z Understanding the 2020 Presidential Election

In understanding the 2020 Presidential Election, students will learn how to read skeptically the political press and how to write critically about presidential campaign politics. Along the way, the course will touch on electoral history, political and social thought, public policy, media criticism, and much more. Students will read past examples of thought-provoking and influential commentary. They will read current coverage in the legacy press of the 2020 presidential election and come to class prepared to discuss the most important stories and issues of the week. Students will have the opportunity to learn about electoral politics and political writing alongside a veteran journalist. Students who have experience working for political campaigns will have a chance to share their knowledge and help the class incorporate their experience in a larger historical framework. They will have a chance to see their work published in the Editorial Board, the lecturer's daily politics newsletter. Students will attempt to do what political writers do in real-time: explain what's happening from a unique, particular, and informed point of view for the benefit of like-minded citizens seeking to achieve the ideal of self-government. In the end, the hope is that students see that campaign politics is simpler and more complex than it appears, but that neither is obvious without study, focus, and understanding.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CSPL402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CSPL405 Ideals into Practice

Through this course, students can earn one quarter credit per year for participating in Ideals into Practice, a program that allows students to make connections between their academic curriculum and the practical experience they gain through campus employment, off-campus internships, community service, and extracurricular activities. By engaging in deep reflection about the skills they are gaining throughout their time at Wesleyan, students will be able to understand and explain to others how their liberal education prepares them for life after college.

Ideals into Practice involves: 1) successful completion of online assignments via Career Decisions: From Insight to Impact on Coursera; 2) participation in a daylong seminar at the start of the spring semester introducing students to an online portfolio platform; 3) completion of reflection pieces uploaded into the student's online portfolio before the end of the spring semester. While a student's online portfolio need not be publicly accessible, students are encouraged to give access to, and discuss the contents with, their faculty and career advisors.

Permission of the instructor is required. For the 2020-21 academic year, course registration is limited to students in the Classes of 2023 or 2024 who were ALSO admitted to Wesleyan 1) as a Posse Scholar; or 2) through QuestBridge; or 3) as a degree-seeking international student on an F-1 or J-1 student visa. If approved, students must also register for the Ideals into Practice program through the Gordon Career Center.
Offering: Host
Grading: BMS
Credits: 0.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL406 Ideals into Practice

Through this course, students can earn one quarter credit per year for participating in Ideals into Practice, a program that allows students to make connections between their academic curriculum and the practical experience they gain through campus employment, off-campus internships, community service, and extracurricular activities. By engaging in deep reflection about the skills they are gaining throughout their time at Wesleyan, students will be able to understand and explain to others how their liberal education prepares them for life after college.

Ideals into Practice involves: 1) successful completion of online assignments via Career Decisions: From Insight to Impact on Coursera; 2) participation in a daylong seminar at the start of the spring semester introducing students to an online portfolio platform; 3) completion of reflection pieces uploaded into the student's online portfolio before the end of the spring semester. While a student's online portfolio need not be publicly accessible, students are encouraged to give access to, and discuss the contents with, their faculty and career advisors.

Permission of the instructor is required. For the 2020-21 academic year, course registration is limited to students in the classes of 2023 or 2024 who were ALSO admitted to Wesleyan 1) as a Posse Scholar; or 2) through QuestBridge; or 3) as a degree-seeking international student on an F-1 or J-1 student visa. If approved, students must also register for the Ideals into Practice program through the Gordon Career Center.
Offering: Host
Grading: BMS
Credits: 0.25
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CSPL412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CSPL419 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

CSPL420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

CSPL480 Engaged Projects

Engaged Projects (EPs) are rigorous, self-designed endeavors in which a student studies a topic of their choice and completes a final project intended for a non-academic audience. Students are encouraged but not required to select a topic that is connected to another class or their major. Final projects can take the form of blogs, videos, a website, or other media; a work of art, an event, a workshop, a presentation, or panel; a policy proposal or analysis; a white paper or op-ed series; a business plan; and/or any other piece(s) thoughtfully designed for the public.

EP students will develop a self-directed research and project plan. They must enlist an EP Sponsor who will serve in an advisory/mentor role; Sponsors can be Wesleyan faculty, staff, alumni, or community partners; family members or friends; or other experts or professionals willing to play this role. Seeking and enlisting an appropriate Sponsor is a component of the EP learning experience.

In addition to conducting their own extensive research and producing a summative project by the end of the semester, students will write a series of reflections to document their progress and their learning.

For more information, visit https://www.wesleyan.edu/patricelli/engaged-projects.html.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Identical With: CGST480
Prereq: None

CSPL491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CSPL492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CSPL494 Internship: Elections

This course may be repeated for credit.

Through this course, students can earn academic credit for an internship, whether paid or unpaid, that involves learning about or participating in the electoral process. This course is part of Wesleyan's E2020 initiative. Students must apply through the instructor; if approved, they will need to register the internship through the Gordon Career Center. The internship must include at least 40 hours of work. In addition to completing the internship satisfactorily, students must comply with the learning requirements and deadlines laid out by the instructor.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.25
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None

CSPL494Z Internship: Elections

This course may be repeated for credit.

Through this course, students can earn academic credit for an internship, whether paid or unpaid, that involves learning about or participating in the electoral process. This course is part of Wesleyan's E2020 initiative. Students must apply through the instructor; if approved, they will need to register the internship through the Gordon Career Center. The internship must include at least 40 hours of work. In addition to completing the internship satisfactorily, students must comply with the learning requirements and deadlines laid out by the instructor.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 0.25
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ALLB
Prereq: None