2021-2022 Edition

Academic Catalog

Center for the Humanities (CHUM)

CHUM202 Deconstructing Democracy

What role does democracy play in the narratives that political philosophers tell themselves about the moment human beings pass from the state of nature into civil society? Why is it that almost all political philosophies have almost nothing good to say about democracy? And how did it happen that democracy has come to be one of the most debated concepts straddling the borderline of the literary and the political, the real and the ideal? Seeking to answer these and other questions, this course will follow the concept of democracy through some canonical and non-canonical texts in or relating to political philosophy. We shall attempt to understand why democracy gives rise to the complications and paradoxes that are definitive of the conceptual space of political society.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: COL205, AMST222
Prereq: None

CHUM202F Deconstructing Democracy (FYS)

What role does democracy play in the narratives that political philosophers tell themselves about the moment human beings pass from the state of nature into civil society? Why is it that almost all political philosophies have almost nothing good to say about democracy? And how did it happen that democracy has come to be one of the most debated concepts straddling the borderline of the literary and the political, the real and the ideal? Seeking to answer these and other questions, this course will follow the concept of democracy through some canonical and non-canonical texts in or relating to political philosophy. We shall attempt to understand why democracy gives rise to the complications and paradoxes that are definitive of the conceptual space of political society.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Prereq: None

CHUM204F Performance and Authenticity between Race and Gender (FYS)

This seminar is a cultural and intellectual history of fraudulence, fiction, and faking it. To deride a person or phenomenon as "all a performance" is to make an accusation of artificiality or inauthenticity. How do colloquial uses of language reflect long-standing cultural suppositions, and how do connotations of performance as fakery or fabrication intersect with the actual work of performers themselves? In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will explore questions of performance, affective labor, subjectivity and self-making (and re-making), both onstage and off. We study performances found equally in everyday life, popular entertainment, and avant-garde art, and center the contributions of Black, feminist, and queer studies.

Topics include illusion, ventriloquism, and sleight of hand, as well as mimetic acting and the manufacture of "emotion," dance technique and the concealment of effort, and musical improvisation and the politics of invention. We consider the potent complexities of drag, camp, and minstrelsy--and historicize their surrounding discourses of fraudulence and authenticity. Looking at a range of (predominantly U.S.-based) practices from the mid-nineteenth century to the late twentieth, this course is not a comprehensive survey, but rather, examines key episodes in the history of modern "performers."

Together, we will grapple with the ways that artifice and theatricality have been historically reviled as qualities inherent to femininity and queerness, respectively; the historically complex entwinement between ideas of race and authenticity; and how hiding, fabulation, exaggeration, and duplicity have been mobilized as strategies of freedom and resistance--from the spectacular escape act of Henry "Box" Brown to the sensational camp and hyperbolic glamour of the East Los Angeles art collective Asco.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Prereq: None

CHUM206F Art and the Global Contemporary (FYS)

This course introduces students to a range of artistic practices from the mid-20th-century to the present. We will consider the work of artists from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Japan, Yugoslavia, Serbia, Germany, Poland, Ghana, Senegal, Mali, Nigeria, China, Iran, Iraq, Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, Haiti, Cuba, Mexico, Vietnam, Thailand, South Korea, India, the Indigenous U.S. and the African Diaspora, among others.

We will not take our central terms for granted. Rather, we will ask: When, precisely, is the contemporary? How do different nations and cultures have varying notions of the present and the past? How do questions of tradition and futurity resonate in artworks, particularly in non- Western and postcolonial contexts?

Together, we will consider the status of the global and the role of the local. In the context of late modernity, can the "global," only ever name the circuits of capitalist exchange? We will consider how artists are both deeply attentive to local contexts, as well as engaged in a practice of diaspora; and how artists engage the politics of land, borders, the nation-state, and the violence that upholds them. That is, we will orient ourselves via a notion of cultural identity that, in Stuart Hall's terms, is "not an essence but a positioning."
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Prereq: None

CHUM214 The Modern and the Postmodern

In this course we will examine how the idea of "the modern" develops at the end of the 18th century and how being modern (or progressive, or hip) became one of the crucial criteria for understanding and evaluating cultural change during the last 200 years. Our readings will be drawn from a variety of areas--philosophy, novels, music, painting, and photography--and we will be concerned with the relations between culture and historical change. Finally, we shall try to determine what it means to be modern today and whether it makes sense to go beyond the modern to the postmodern.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-HIST
Identical With: HIST214, COL214
Prereq: None

CHUM228 Virtue and Vice in History, Literature, and Philosophy

Beginning with Confucius and Aristotle and reading our way through significant texts of Christianity, humanism, postmodernism, and critical race theory, we will explore the ethics, power, and politics intersecting in ideas of virtue
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-COL
Identical With: COL228, PHIL112, HIST140
Prereq: None

CHUM229 Between Worlds: Change and Continuity in Early Latin America

The conquest and colonization of the Americas challenged long-held assumptions about geography, time, history, nature, theology, and humanity for both indigenous societies and Europeans. Modern scholars have described the encounter either as an earth-shattering moment of revolutionary intellectual reverberations or, alternatively, as one of limited and slower impact.

This course examines the ways in which diverse actors in the Iberian colonial world confronted change and continuity in their societies. In particular, it seeks to understand how they approached the conquest and its environmental, political, religious, legal, and social repercussions. Through the study of chronicles, graphic materials, poetry, omens, grammars, and maps, we will look at how missionaries, indigenous scholars, scientists, and nuns interpreted the forces transforming their communities. We will pay particular attention to the traditions and practices that they mobilized to explain the past and convey its present and future significance. Major themes include religious conversion and its consequences, the emergence of new social and ethnic identities under colonial institutions, linguistic change, and the writing of history.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: HIST356, LAST229
Prereq: None

CHUM233 All Ah We: Contemporary Afro-Caribbean Drama & Performance

What are the dramatic utterances of Afro-Caribbean artists? How do Afro-Caribbean playwrights and other narrative-based performance artists present "Caribbean" and/or "West Indian" subjectivities in ways that are shared, yet critically different? In what ways are Afro-Caribbean dramas and performance pieces repositories for the practical, the theoretical, the sociological, the political, the imagined, and the lost? In answering these questions and more, we examine these textual and embodied expressions from the complicated crossroads of class, creolization, diaspora, ethnicity, folklore, gender, history, indentured servitude, isolation, language, race, religion, and slavery. At all times, this course revels in the polyphony that is Afro-Caribbean drama and performance.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL233, AFAM233, THEA233
Prereq: None

CHUM248 Shakespearean Revolutions

Shakespeare's works emerged during a period of revolutionary social, political, religious, economic, and cultural change, including the Protestant Reformation, the rise of print culture, the transition from feudalism to mercantile capitalism, early colonialism, global trade, and the emergence of the first, purpose-built, commercial playhouses. Innovations in dramatic form and genre, which Shakespeare helped craft, sought in varying ways to make sense of these momentous shifts for diverse theater publics. Revivals and adaptations of his works on stage and screen during times of revolutionary change have rendered the Shakespearean canon a site of subsequent social and cultural contestation. This class considers the "revolutionary" dimension of four Shakespeare plays both in their own time and place, and in later theatrical and filmic productions and adaptations. We will trace first-, second-, and third-wave feminist reimaginings of "The Taming of the Shrew"; Second World War- and Vietnam War-era renderings of "Henry V"; civil rights and anti-apartheid era restagings of "Othello"; and attempts to decolonize "The Tempest."
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL248
Prereq: None

CHUM274 Insular Borders of Latin(x) America

Before and at the same time the United States established itself throughout the 19th century as a major power in the Americas and the world, various Latin American republics inherited and acted upon a similar imperialist agenda to expand their borders not only to neighboring territories but also across oceans. In this class, we will study and compare these imperialist gestures, among them the Spanish Empire's control of its remaining insular colonies in the 19th century (e.g., Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Philippines, and Guam) and the United States' successive claim to these very same islands. We will analyze literary works and films that interrogate these imperialist claims as well as the trajectories of islanders: for instance, the forced migration of the Rapanui (Easter Island people) in the second half of the 19th century (first as slaves to Peru and then to the town of Hanga Roa in Easter Island) and the island-to-island "intra-colonial" (Joanna Poblete) recruitment of Filipino and Puerto Rican laborers in sugar plantations in Hawai'i at the beginning of the 20th century. Some of the questions we will explore are: Why are islands so coveted by old and new empires? How have Rapanui, Filipino, and Puerto Rican migrants and their descendants resisted authorities on the insular borders of empire? How do writers and artists tell these silenced histories? Can we speak of Latinidad and Edouard Glissant's concept of Poetics of Relation in a Pacific Ocean context? Readings will be in Spanish and English. All discussions and assignments will be in Spanish.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: LAST274, AMST289, SPAN274
Prereq: None

CHUM276 Moving Through the Revolutionary Age: British Colonies and Early America, 1774--1815

Thomas Jefferson argued in his 1805 inaugural address that boundaries were less important than principles. Regardless of where they lived, Americans were Americans. British colonists were equally mobile and equally sure that their British liberties followed them wherever they went, which in no small part led to the Revolution. In the period during and after the American Revolution, with the creation of states and colonies in northern North America, people and ideas moved with regularity from one region to the next, thus testing Jefferson's ideals and extant imperial bonds. This course will examine the movement of peoples and ideas within and across these new boundaries to explore the idea of mobility as a revolutionary, Native, and loyalist ideal. American settlers wanted to push west, and some later moved north; Natives desired to maintain their migratory patterns and traditional lands; and British Loyalists moved to remain members of--and demand changes within--the British Empire, while also relocating to American states when necessary. The borders that divided colonies and separated states were challenged and ignored as soon as they were created. By exploring the political ideals, territorial claims, and movement of people during and after the American Revolution, students will be encouraged to study the Revolution not as an American event, but rather as a North American process shaped by those who moved through it.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CHUM
Identical With: HIST310
Prereq: None

CHUM281 Political Fantasies of Zion

Palestine, Zion, Judah, the Promised Land. A small piece of land in the Middle East has a very long and contested history full of religious meaning for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Some imagine the State of Israel as an island--"the only democracy in the Middle East" or the only Western state in the region--surrounded by a hostile environment. The geographical area, by contrast, has often been portrayed as a crossroad, a place where cultures clashed, merged, and exchanged ideas.

In this class, we will examine this tension between a physical and imagined space, between political reality and idea, by recovering alternative Zionist, non-Zionist, and anti-Zionist visions of the Zion. Jewish statehood is a very recent phenomenon. Throughout the modern period, the vast majority of Jews lived under empires, whether Habsburg, French, Romanov, British, or Ottoman. How did the imperial experience shape Jewish religious and political views? What role does the imagination of Zion play in today's political context? Reading political pamphlets, poetry, maps, artworks, and utopian fiction, we will pay attention to the construction of the Zionist idea not just in political Zionism but also in contrasting visions including Canaanism, cultural Zionism, diaspora nationalism, a Jewish-Arab federation, a binational state, and the rejection of statehood as heresy. In the last part of the class, we will look at recent contemporary issues from the news, e.g., the agreements between the State of Israel and the United Arab Emirates, or government corruption in Israel, in order to see how these ideas of Zion are still present in today's discourse.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: CJST281, RELI281
Prereq: None

CHUM288 Literary Perversions: Revolution, Democracy, Identity

The Federalist Papers wrote under the strong impression that the American Revolution was imperiled by an overwhelming debt and the lack of a national authority and identity to bind the States together. Public fear of moral degeneration via the replacement of the "Old World" symbolic order with a "New World" order under the aegis of "representative democracy" loomed over the republic.

Taking these concerns and the dissemination of The Federalist Papers as our point of departure, this course will examine how representations of "non-normative" identities in several major 19th-century works relate to the problems of representing democracy in the aftermath of the American Revolution. Many of the most famous canonical literary texts in the United States during the 19th century write about "non-normative" topics such as maternity, slavery, bestiality, and gender inequality in the context of narratives that attempt to rewrite the legacy of the American Revolution. By focusing on the literary treatment of these "perverse" topics, we shall attempt to understand whether the authors we will undertake close readings of in this course were successful in their endeavors to not only amend the shortcomings of the Revolution, but also to think more rigorously about the history of slavery and gender inequality.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: ENGL284
Prereq: None

CHUM289 Staging Race in Early Modern England

This course analyzes the dramatic representation of race in the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. We will examine the historical emergence of race as a cultural construct in relation to related conceptions of complexion, the humoral body, gender, sexuality, and religious, ethnic, and national identity. Readings focus on three racialized groups: Moors, Jews, and Native American "Indians." After reading the play-texts in relation to the historical moment in which they were first produced (using both primary and secondary sources) we will then consider their post-Renaissance performance histories, including literary, theatrical, and film adaptations.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL280, FGSS320, THEA290
Prereq: None

CHUM298 (Un)Sound Projections: When Spaces Resist Recording

The class would involve a series of discussions around field recordings and site-specific compositions. This would involve a survey of landmark and recent recordings in this vein (e.g., Pauline Oliveros, Stuart Dempster, and Paniotis [Deep Listening Band] at the Dan Harpole Cistern; Chris Watson's "Outside the Circle of Fire"; Sylvi MacCormac's "Voices and Wheels"; Peter Cusack's "Sounds from Dangerous Places"; and works by Jacob Kirkegaard, among other sound artists and composers).
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Prereq: None

CHUM302 Black Speculative Fictions and the Anthropocene

The genre of black speculative fiction--in the form of literature, art, music, and theory--provides a generative framework through which to (re)think understandings of race, gender, sexuality, class, the body, disability, citizenship, and the human. Often couched as taking place in the "future," black speculative fictions also engage the past and critique the present. This makes the genre a critical resource for addressing the Anthropocene. The term "Anthropocene" first emerged from the discipline of geology in 2000. Scientists proposed that Earth had entered a new epoch (following the Holocene) in which "humans" had become geological forces, impacting the planet itself. However, the term Anthropocene raises numerous questions. What does it mean to think about the human at the level of a "species"? What constitutes evidence of the Anthropocene and when did it begin? Who is responsible for the Anthropocene's attendant catastrophes, which include earthquakes, altered ocean waters, and massive storms? Does the Anthropocene overemphasize the human and thus downplay other interspecies and human-nonhuman, animate-inanimate relations? Or does it demand a (potentially fruitful) reconceptualization of the human? Further, how does artificial intelligence complicate definitions of the human and, by extension, of the Anthropocene? Centering the work of black speculative thinkers and placing it in conversation with scientific studies ranging from marine biology and geology to cybernetics, this course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the Anthropocene that endeavors to (re)conceptualize the human, ecological relations, and Earth itself. Texts engaged will include: novels, art, music, theory, and scientific studies.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: AFAM312, E&ES125, FGSS301
Prereq: None

CHUM306 Techniques of the Liar: Performance, Artifice, Fraud

This seminar is a cultural and intellectual history of fraudulence, fiction, and faking it. We will explore both specific performance practices as well as theorizations of artifice, fraud, and authenticity. Topics will include illusion, ventriloquism, and sleight of hand; mimetic acting and the manufacture of "emotion"; dance technique and the concealment of effort; and musical improvisation and the politics of invention. We will also consider the complexities of drag, camp, and minstrelsy and historicize their surrounding discourses, centering the contributions of feminist, queer, and critical race studies. Looking at a range of (predominantly U.S.-based) practices from the mid-19th century to the present, we will consider how artifice and theatricality have been historically reviled as qualities inherent to femininity and queerness, respectively; how "authenticity" is both gendered and racialized; and how hiding, fabulation, exaggeration, and duplicity have also offered means of freedom or resistance.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: FGSS305, THEA306
Prereq: None

CHUM308 Asian American Posthumanisms: Biopolitics, Ecopoetics, and Literature

From 19th-century anxieties concerning subhuman coolies to 21st-century celebrations of suprahuman cyborgs, US discourses have always figured people of Asian descent as peripheral to the category of the human. While Asian Americanist scholarship has often responded by asserting the humanity of Asian Americans, a number of scholars and writers have begun to explore and even embrace the inhuman character of the Asian American. Drawing from recent scholarship in science studies, political ecology, anthropology, and literary studies, this course will consider what it looks like to shift the scale of analysis from the individual, organismal human to the social logics, biopolitical infrastructures, and ecological entanglements that supersede the human, or conversely, to the bodily fragments, molecular processes, and fragments that subtend the scale of the human. We will pay particular attention to the question of what consequences decentering the human has for the ethnic novel, a genre often valued for its ability to affirm the humanity of racialized subjects. For instance, what kinds of aesthetics and politics emerge from an imaginary centered not on the human individual but on systems, landscapes, entanglements, and other imaginative forms and social practices? What does a novel centered not on a human protagonist but on an object, a clone, or an ecosystem look like?

To explore these non-human centered logics and forms, we will read theoretical texts by Anne Cheng, Rey Chow, Donna Haraway, Aihwa Ong, Rachel Lee, Nikolas Rose, Anna Tsing, and others, alongside a selection of contemporary (and capaciously defined) Asian/American novels by writers such as Kazuo Ishiguro, Larissa Lai, Chang-rae Lee, Ruth Ozeki, and others.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: ENGL306
Prereq: None

CHUM315 Emperor, Caliph, King: Comparing the Byzantines, Abbasids, and Carolingians

This seminar investigates a unique "age of empires" in the wider Mediterranean world--the ninth century--during which imperializing political revolutions inspired intense cultural production among the Byzantines in Constantinople, the Abbasids in Baghdad, and the Carolingians across Europe. Using the cultural artifacts surviving from these "renaissances," we will investigate how political cultures accounted for their own contested identities through myths of rebirth and return, specifically of Greek, Roman, and Persian imperial traditions. The course uses a workshop environment that relies on both collaboration and independent research; students will apply skills of analysis, creative thinking, and persuasive communication to presentations and a (in-translation) source-based research project.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-COL
Identical With: COL347, HIST327
Prereq: None

CHUM325 The Work of Art Against Work: Art, Labor, Politics

Understandings of late 19th- and early 20th-century avant-gardes are tied inextricably to leftist theory, particularly that of the Frankfurt School. This advanced seminar will consider the legacies of that entwinement, while focusing more specifically on its transformations from the late 20th century to the present: We will examine how artists have engaged the "work" of art in relation to the rise of post-Fordism, a globalized economy, and new theories of work and anti-capitalism. We will pay special attention to gendered notions of work and the division of labor (including "craft," affective labor, domestic work, care work, sex work, and more), to debt and racial capitalism, and to the rise of speculative finance and its links to the art market and the patron class.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: FGSS335, AMST325
Prereq: None

CHUM328 Disgusting? Revolting!

Who or what do we find utterly repugnant? Are we the nasty, vile ones? Is it possible that we are unconsciously attracted to that which disgusts us? What might it take to turn disgust into desire, and vice versa? In what ways might disgust indicate not only disruption or transgression, but some kind of threat and alternative to the status quo? What might be lost or gained when the disgusting clean up their acts, or are shown to have been respectable all along? In this course we will explore the politics of filth, particularly in terms of the desires, attitudes, identities, and behaviors that elicit disgust. We will consider how disgust infuses political ideology--i.e., how people understand and approach the social groups that disgust them (for example, racialized immigrants, queers, fat people, and drug addicts), but also the wealthy, the privileged, the "basket of deplorables." We will also explore the psychoanalytic relation of disgust to desire.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CHUM
Identical With: SOC321
Prereq: None

CHUM331 Sophist, Statesman, Philosopher: Plato's Later Metaphysics and Politics

How is it possible to speak falsely? Plato connects this question with a puzzle he inherits from the great pre-Socratic philosopher Parmenides: to speak falsely is to speak about what is not; but in speaking about what is not, we ascribe being somehow to not-being, which sounds like a contradiction. This seminar will focus on the metaphysical, epistemological, and political issues generated by Parmenides's puzzle and explore Plato's solution to them in two of his later-period works: the Sophist and the Statesman. In the process, we will see how Plato rethinks his theory of forms in these dialogues, how he learns to let go of Socrates, how a sophist should be distinguished from a philosopher, and how all of this is relevant to politics and the art of ruling.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CHUM
Identical With: PHIL306, COL335
Prereq: None

CHUM333 About Clothes: Styles, Histories, Activisms, Poetics

This course is a chance to think together about living in, and in relation with, clothes. We will examine some of the histories, meanings, and monies that circulate around sartorial style, focusing on several interconnected sites around the world, from the eighteenth century to the present, and drawing on literature, performance, visual arts, historical and scientific scholarship, journalism, and activism. As we investigate forms of work, representation, and resistance that have produced some of the clothes of this time and of the past, we will study the transatlantic and global circuits (among Europe, Africa, Asia, and the U.S.) that have informed various fashion systems. We will consider how particular textiles and textures, cuts of cloth, and racialized and gendered ideas of style emerged in conjunction with enslaved and other forms of labor. We will look at some examples of how the work, products, and pleasures of this multi-billion-dollar business have been considered trivial and fleeting. We will learn about various efforts to archive and preserve clothes. Thinking always about connections between style and sexuality, we will look also at ritual, political, and medical uses of clothing. Throughout, you will conduct your own experiments at the intersections among language, identities, and the materiality of clothes. This seminar will welcome guest speakers who are experts on aspects of African, European, British, African-American, and Middle Eastern clothing and fashion. We will also be in conversation with the work of scholars and artists visiting the Center for the Humanities for the semester's theme of Ephemerality.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: ENGL332, FGSS333, THEA333
Prereq: None

CHUM334 Native Matters: Materiality in Indigenous Literatures Across the Pacific

This seminar contemplates the function and representation of materiality in contemporary indigenous literatures. It highlights the centrality of embodied practices in indigenous cultural lives. The primary texts for the course will be literary texts (novels, short stories, essays, and poems) from different indigenous communities, including from North America, East Asia, Austrasia, and Oceania. We may also deal with non-textual materials such as artifacts, maps, clothes, video games, etc. Readings will also include theoretical or philosophical works from indigenous and non-indigenous thinkers on the subject of materials and materiality.

The course will thematize materiality in two ways: the first is to understand materiality as a way for indigenous authors to represent or construct various understandings of indigeneity, either in traditional lifeways, modern indigenous realities, or indigenous futurisms, both within and between specific indigenous communities. The second is to engage with thing theory and materiality as a method of literary analysis.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: CEAS334, WLIT325
Prereq: None

CHUM336 Black Texts, Lost and Found

This course examines histories of loss and recovery of black texts in the US and the Atlantic world more broadly. We will bring a three-pronged approach to our subject matter. We will analyze first the constitutive silences of the archive: epistemic and material neglect, or what Michel Trouillot has termed the "silencing of the past"; second, the preservation efforts of black newspaper editors, librarians, and bibliophiles; and third, the "counter-archiving" work of Afro-diasporic historical and speculative fiction. As we traverse different periods and empires we will consider what the concepts of the "black archive" and "black ephemera" mean to different disciplines. We will study the repressions of black Arabic writing practices in the US South and our fragmentary recovery of them in the late 20th century, unfinished novels about Black Atlantic revolutions such as Martin Delany's "Blake," incomplete runs of historic black newspapers, debates about the illusions and desires of "recovery," and the criteria that determine what counts as ephemeral and when.

We will move across different media, from print--"I, Tituba," "M Archive," "Blake," "(Dis)forming the American Canon: African-Arabic Slave Narratives and the Vernacular"--to films--"The Watermelon Woman," "Looking for Langston," "The Last Angel of History"--and from digitized databases of photographs at the ongoing archiving project The Missing Chapter: Black Chronicles to digitized newspaper archives.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: ENGL357, AFAM336
Prereq: None

CHUM337 Insubstantial Pageants: Late Shakespeare

This seminar examines the Center for the Humanities' Spring 2020 theme of "Ephemera" through the lens of four late plays by Shakespeare ("Hamlet," "King Lear," "The Winter's Tale," "The Tempest") and their preoccupation with the time, temporality, belatedness, and the ephemerality of theater (and the world-as-stage).

In addition to considering the mutability of the play-texts themselves (several of which exist in multiple versions), we will consider how they refashion their sources, and how they are themselves refashioned in later productions and adaptations.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: ENGL321, THEA337
Prereq: None

CHUM339 Catching Glimpses: Perceiving Infinitesimals in the Scientific Revolution

The rise of mathematical natural science in the early modern period marked the dissolution of objective reality as it had previously been known. Since Aristotle, perceptible objects had been understood to be enduring substances whose identities were inscribed in their very being and which retained these identities through change. The mechanistic worldview of the 17th and 18th centuries exploded this stable order into a telescoping multiplicity of material systems, from the infinitesimally small to the infinitely large. Rather than encountering a world of enduring and identifiable substances--animals, vegetables, and minerals; people and artifacts--the perceiver was instead confronted with fleeting constellations of homogeneous matter in a perpetual flux, no sooner glimpsed than gone. This metaphysical picture of infinitary flux was complemented by a new branch of mathematics, the infinitesimal calculus, which proved immensely successful both in uncovering new theorems and in modeling empirical phenomena.

Both the metaphysics and the mathematics of the new science were, however, rife with paradox. If material objects not only harbor a microscopic substructure but are, in fact, divisible without end, then we are faced with pluralities of pluralities without any underlying unities--parts of parts of parts...and not a whole among them. Conceptual instability afflicted the infinitesimals used in calculus, as well. In some contexts they were treated as very small but non-zero quantities, in others as strictly zero--provoking one critic to call them "ghosts of departed quantities."

In conjunction with the CHUM theme "Ephemera," this class will study the philosophical turbulence induced by the new science--in particular, by the mechanical philosophy and infinitesimal calculus. We will pay special attention to its consequences for the philosophy of perception. Aristotle compared perceptible objects to signet rings impressing their distinctive forms on the receptive wax of the human sensorium. But if there are no enduring substances or determinate forms, how are we to understand our perceptual relation to the world? How must perceptual experience be reconceived so as to accommodate the fleetingness and flux of material phenomena? And how is it that, though we are awash in ephemera, we nevertheless enjoy an (illusory?) impression of endurance and stability?
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: COL351, GRST249, PHIL302, SISP339
Prereq: None

CHUM341 Global Histories: Problems in Scale, Scope, Depth, and Time

How big is too big? How far back in time can historians go? How best to understand the relationship between science and history? What counts as evidence? What accounts for the rise (or return, some would argue) of macro-history? What does it portend for the future of microhistory? This advanced seminar will examine the history and historiographical implications of macro-historical frameworks, including comparative history, world history, global history, deep history, and big history.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-HIST
Identical With: HIST315
Prereq: None

CHUM343 Imitations of Life: Experimental Bodies at the Interface of Science and Culture

This seminar will examine scientific and cultural practices of corporeal simulation, or, practices of bodily substitution, imitation, and re/modeling. Topics examined will include: reproductive surrogacy; gender reassignment surgeries; experimental subject protocols; prosthetic enhancements; xenotransplantation; biometrics and alternative forms of bodily imaging; the use of nonhuman animals as human proxies; the rise of personalized medicine, and more. Students will engage with a wide range of case studies and theoretical materials from interdisciplinary perspectives. Special attention will be paid to the relationship between scientific discourses of "universality" and "particularity," where socio-cultural forms of difference (e.g., race, gender, disability, etc.) are at once ignored and exacerbated. While most of the material addressed in the class will relate to recent phenomena, we will also be attentive to relevant histories of corporeal differentiation and reimaging.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM, SBS-CHUM
Identical With: FGSS343, SISP343
Prereq: None

CHUM344 Contemporary Theater: Theories and Aesthetics

This class will serve as an introduction to Theater & Performance Studies, interdisciplinary fields that brush against anthropology, linguistics, critical race studies, psychoanalysis, queer theory, and art history. We will approach "performance" as a practice and a lens. Students will explore close reading strategies for both textual and live performance events and examine live art, theater, everyday performances, and presentations of the self. This course will pay particular attention to the social and cultural importance of performance and performativity, especially as they come to bear upon queer, black, Latinx, and indigenous lives and dreams.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-THEA
Identical With: THEA302
Prereq: THEA105 OR THEA150 OR THEA245 OR [THEA199 or ENGL269] OR THEA185

CHUM345 Historicizing Early Modern Sexualities

This course will examine recent historical and theoretical approaches to the history of sexuality in early modern English literature (ca. 1580-1680). Our focus will be the historical construction of sexuality in relation to categories of gender, race, religion, and social status in a variety of sources, both literary and nonliterary, verbal and visual, including poetry, plays, masques, medical treatises, travel narratives, and visual media. Topics covered include intersecting constructions of the sexed/gendered/racialized body; diverse sexual practices; sexual identities prior to the homo/hetero divide; and the histories of pornography and masturbation.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL349, FGSS350
Prereq: ENGL201

CHUM347 Sound Systems: The How of Hearing

Since the late 19th century artists, corporations and composers have all proposed, developed, presented, and occasionally commercialized physical systems that reconfigure how sound can be experienced. The early impact of the entertainment industry ranged from the introduction of stereo to movie theaters in Walt Disney's Fantasia to the development of close miking for the crooning of Bing Crosby to McCune sound service's introduction of stage monitors for the benefit of Judy Garland. Artists and composers used related methods to propose entirely new understandings of how music can be. Futurist Luigi Russolo's Intonarumori of 1913 proposed an Art of Noise, while Pauline Oliveros' concept of deep listening developed listening as a foundational form of music making. R. Murray Schafer's concepts of soundscape and acoustic ecology project a music of environmental relations mediated through sound, while Maryanne Amacher's sound characters create individual sounds understood as capable development and change beyond the expanse of any one performance or composition.

This class will be a performing ensemble focused on "sound systems" as musical instruments and musical practices performing live and fixed media sound pieces through sound systems we will configure for different sites on campus. Together with developing the technical skills required to mount these pieces, we will also investigate and discuss the varied musical, social, acoustical, and psycho-acoustical understandings of music and sound that influenced their shaping.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-MUSC
Identical With: MUSC461
Prereq: MUSC109

CHUM349 Body Histories in Africa

African bodies have long generated intrigue and misunderstanding. Outside observers, such as missionaries, travelers, colonial administrators, and anthropologists, have documented practices such as scarification and spirit possession as they simultaneously rendered their African practitioners "other." All too often the body as an instrument for creative expression, ritual healing, or social action was lost in translation. More recently Western feminists have focused their attentions on female circumcision. The persistence of circumcision (for both girls and boys) and other bodily practices speaks to their enduring social value and symbolic meaning. What can we learned from these and other body histories in Africa? In this course we will examine embodied rituals such as spirit possession, which marks the body as a site for human engagement with the supernatural. The widespread practice is also a gendered technique of healing documenting shifting understandings of health and illness. In addition, we will study the practice of "sitting on a man" by which women addressed the body politic through dance and collective nudity. The revealed body in motion shamed men into action and has been employed in the 21st century to shame oil companies for their greed and environmental destruction. In this and other examples, we will approach the body as an archive: it is an archive in motion and subject to social renewal. Our embodied evidence will allow us to explore shifting histories of religion, art, sexuality, the economy, and politics from the precolonial era to the contemporary moment. By taking the body as our lens we will also learn new ways to examine the African past through histories of aesthetics, value, labor, hierarchy, and knowledge production.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: HIST341
Prereq: None

CHUM351 Melodrama Since 1700

Although today melodrama calls up ideas related to film, the term has musical origins: it originally indicated a work in which melos (music) and spoken drama were united in one multimedia format. Eighteenth-century melodrama admitted of many manifestations, encompassing everything from comic operas (like Mozart's Magic Flute, which alternated singing with spoken dialogue) to experimental symphonic works (in which a narrator's declaimed monologue was emotionally painted by the accompanying orchestra). Melodrama in this musical sense persisted through to the twentieth century, and included notable works such as Schoenberg's Pierrot Lunaire. But slowly melodrama as a term began to take on connotations relating to one of comic opera's central conceits: hyperbole and exaggeration. Melodrama became synonymous with comic excesses of emotional portrayal. Eventually, during the twentieth century, this meaning fastened onto a constellation of generic implications within the domain of film (think, for example, of Joan Crawford in Mildred Pierce). In its afterlife during the twenty-first century, melodrama has sometimes been used pejoratively: it can be employed as an epithet to disqualify the performance of emotion as inappropriately intense, or to designate emotion connected to an ostensibly inappropriate subject. But even in this new sense, melodrama retains an element of its early history insofar as it can be appropriated within subcultures in order to comically mock the traditions of mass culture. This course examines the long history of melodramatic art forms from the eighteenth century through to the present day. Together we will perform close readings of the objects within this rich tradition, supplemented by readings in queer theory, critical theory, and performance studies.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-MUSC
Identical With: THEA351
Prereq: MUSC201 OR MUSC202

CHUM352 Following Fornés: Creativity, Intimacy, and Imagination

This course undertakes an investigation and application of the creative process of visionary iconoclast Maria Irene Fornés: a queer, Latinx playwright whose wildly idiosyncratic plays defied both convention and categorization. Fornés' legendary workshops shaped a generation of playwrights, including Nilo Cruz, Caridad Svich, and Sarah Ruhl.

Students will engage with Fornés' own creative process via her ephemera: in this case, the spoken fragments, outtakes, and audio marginalia left behind from the filming of her documentary collaboration with director Michelle Memran, "The Rest I Make Up." As I work to compile and cohere this material into a book, the class will be applying it, directly, to the conception and creation of their own performance works.

Students who are interested in writing/directing/devising live works of performance are best suited to this class. No former experience necessary, but a willingness to create and share live work and writing on a weekly basis is required. Our work will be contextualized by assigned research and writing into Fornés as a key figure of the American theater, and will culminate in the presentation of our creative projects.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: THEA352
Prereq: None

CHUM353 Media Revolutions: Color Television and the Humanities in the 1960s and 1970s

This course visits some of the groundbreaking TV series that presented humanities and sciences to global mass audiences in the 1960s and 1970s. Television emerged as a powerful cultural presence and with remarkable speed. From the late 1960s, the British Broadcasting Company, in partnership with PBS in America, created a series of television programs (partly to widen the audience market for new color television programming). This course focuses on the role of television as a still new, and potentially disruptive, medium. We will look at and discuss a range of British TV series from Kenneth Clark's "Civilisation" and "Monty Python's Flying Circus" (both 1969) to Jacob Bronowski's "The Ascent of Man" (1973) and Alistair Cooke's "America" (1972), John Kenneth Galbraith's "The Age of Uncertainty" (1977), and David Attenborough's "Life on Earth" (first aired in 1979). We will read and discuss works of art and media criticism around this time that laid the groundwork for major conceptual and theoretical remappings of the fields of cultural and visual studies. We also will explore the impact of television on art worlds and museums, looking at how 1960s' color television documentaries influenced the way that humanities are presented televisually up to today. This course satisfies requirements for the "Visual and Material Culture" module in history and major requirements for the Science in Society Program.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: HIST345, SISP352
Prereq: None

CHUM355 Social Movements Lab

What can we learn from social justice activists about the economic, political, and environmental struggles facing us today, including mass incarceration, immigration, economic precarity, and the violence of the state? Where are the critical sites of queer, trans, left, feminist, black, indigenous, disability, and environmental struggle? How do these movements converge, and where do they diverge?

This participatory, interdisciplinary research seminar enables you to embark on an independent, semester-long research project on the social movement or activism of your choice. We'll start with some foundational reading on multidisciplinary social movement research; archival, ethnographic, and participatory methodologies; and histories of social justice struggles in the U.S. The remainder and majority of the seminar is laboratory style, taking shape around your particular projects. Each week, we will collaboratively analyze one or two projects, mapping out and comparing methods, goals, visions, struggles, and contexts of the movements under study. Our goal is to understand a range of social justice activisms in their economic, political, and historical context, with an eye toward integrating activist scholarship and social change.

The activism you research can be contemporary or historical; local, national, or global; and can take any shape: direct action, community organizing, activist philanthropy, art as activism, etc. You do not need previous experience or activist contacts for this course--just passion and the desire to learn collaboratively!
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CHUM
Identical With: ANTH355, FGSS355, AMST357
Prereq: None

CHUM358 Fugitive Perspectives on Education and Civil Society

In 1946, the African American novelist Ann Petry imagined what a white schoolteacher might think about working with black students in Harlem, New York: "Working in this school was like being in a jungle. It was filled with the smell of the jungle, she thought: tainted food, rank, unwashed bodies." Petry had herself worked in Harlem schools. She also held credentials from well-heeled white schools in Connecticut. Despite her own academic success, she questioned the inherent value of schools that regarded black children as if they were untamed savages.

Challenging prevailing narratives of excellence and achievement, this course examines fugitive perspectives of black, Indigenous, LBGTQ, and poor folks who resisted compulsory schooling and avoided conscription into so-called civilized society. If, as historian Michael B. Katz has argued, US schools "are imperial institutions designed to civilize the natives; they exist to do something to poor children, especially, now, children who are black or brown," then why should any self-respecting black or brown child endure such schooling? What might so-called truants, illiterates, failures, burnouts, dropouts, and delinquents teach us about education and civil society?

The history of education, however, has largely been interpreted from a biased perspective--namely, those who have been successfully schooled. We will therefore search for contrary voices in fragments of oral culture, ranging from slave narratives to folktales and recorded music. Contemporary scholarship will inform our analysis. Interdisciplinary scholars such as James Scott, Eric Hobsbawm, Tera Hunter, Saidiya Hartman, Lisa Brooks, and Audra Simpson will illustrate how to read against the grain and unearth hidden transcripts from classic authors such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Carter G. Woodson, Anna Julia Cooper, and Gertrude Simmons Bonin.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: AMST358, EDST358
Prereq: None

CHUM359 Making the Psychological: Discovering, Manufacturing, Circulating

Psychology aims to explain human experiences and thoughts, including unconscious ones. Using scientific methods, psychology produces valid representations of human nature, names them, and circulates that knowledge for both its truth value and usefulness to society and individuals. Despite much success in these aims, the validity of much of psychology's knowledge is in being challenged - as evidenced in recent concerns about the reproducibility of experiments. We will examine the epistemic grounds of psychology's truth claims and consider alternative models that understand the truth claims to be enactments, constructions, or ideologies that rehearse cultural beliefs. Case studies of science-based knowledge eventually found to be inaccurate or exaggerated (priming research; the power pose) are used to examine how some truth claims are generated and challenged, and cases of robust research are used to explore how some truth claims acquire credibility inside and outside the laboratory. We ask, too, how these claims travel to be taken up as new ways for individuals to experience the self and social world, and examine the public's and our own aspirations to expand consciousness and act otherwise. Students will develop case studies of psychological knowledge, its validation, circulation, and effects in the world.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CHUM
Identical With: PSYC359, SISP360
Prereq: PSYC105

CHUM361 Queer & Trans Erotic Archives

Is it possible to capture and archive ephemeral, flickering pleasures? This course addresses this question by problematizing the relationship between embodied pleasures and affective memories on the one hand and historical analyses on the other. Based on Derrida's critique of archives' selective preservation mechanisms and reification of normative narratives, queer studies scholars have tried to create their own "counter-archives," often by means of an alternative reading of conventional archives. First, participants will discuss the ethics of reenactments and appropriations of archived desires, analyzing specific case studies that will be an entry point into broader issues related to the scholar's involvement in the voyeurism of the archive. Second, participants will discuss how a focus on queer cultures leads to a rethinking of what constitutes archival material, expanding this definition to include erotica and porn, feelings, ephemera, performances, and mass media. Course readings will also reveal the artificiality of the established boundaries between high and low culture, between authoritative knowledge and experiments with bodily pleasures. The course interrogates pornography's potential as a historical source that reveals non-normative fantasies. Participants will discuss the relationship between sexual fantasy and social reality, between representations of idealized boundless pleasure, and historical contexts of stigmatization, pathologization, and institutional violence. This will lead to debates on archival sexual activism and minoritized bodies in the archive, in order to fully grasp the contraposition between over-determination and queer utopianism.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: FGSS361
Prereq: None

CHUM362 Visualizing Black Remains

This advanced seminar engages African Diaspora critical thought and aesthetic production (visual art, performance, film, literature) that grapple with the appetite, effects, and stakes of representing Black remains. What does this visual reproduction make possible or obscure, and what is its relationship to violence? The class will also encourage students to think about the ethics of reparation/repatriation in relation to forms of loss and dispossession that can neither be repaired/repatriated nor visually evidenced (in conventional ways). In those instances, how do contemporary critical thinkers and/as contemporary artists help us rethink loss, mourning, objecthood, violence, empathy, and reparation?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: AFAM363, ANTH362, ENGL363, FGSS362, THEA362
Prereq: None

CHUM363 (Un)Popular Performances/Performances (Im)Populaires

In 1607, a young Scotsman named William Drummond was studying law in Bourges, France, a popular "study abroad destination" for Scottish students as well as an important stopover city on the routes of itinerant professional and amateur actors. While in Bourges, these actors performed a variety of different kinds of plays, including tragedies, comedies, tragicomedies, pastorals, and farces. Although these performances were often met with hostility from the city's religious authorities, Drummond attended several plays during his stay and, lucky for us, took rather detailed notes about them. His observations from the 1607 "season" are preserved in his personal papers in the National Library of Scotland.

This course will use Drummond's notes as a guide to discover and examine other forms of evidence--both traditional and nontraditional--that help us understand what was at stake in theater, performance, and (un)popular culture in late 16th- and early 17th-century France. We will study the ways the past has been organized and cataloged, how traditional sources and research have shaped our view of the past, and how unconventional methodologies can help us locate new sites of knowledge and culture. Written assignments, class discussions, and (most) readings will be in French.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: COL363, FREN363, MDST363, THEA363
Prereq: None

CHUM364 Shakespeare's Islands

How did England's insularity and expansionist ambitions on the world's stage shape Shakespearean dramaturgy in his many plays with island settings? This course, taught in conjunction with the Center for the Humanities' spring 2022 theme of "Islands as Metaphor and Method" considers how Shakespeare's island locales (e.g., in ancient and medieval Britain, the Mediterranean, and the Americas) transformed the Globe theater into a physical and conceptual site for imagining the utopian and dystopian potential of early English nation-building and colonial expansion, and for exploring the poetics of relation and alterity, peripherality and centrality, archaism and futurity. In addition to studying the play-texts themselves, we will consider how their island settings are explored in subsequent theatrical and film productions and adaptations.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: ENGL377, THEA346
Prereq: None

CHUM368 Comparative Philosophy

This seminar will explore the substantive and methodological issues that arise when one takes seriously the idea that philosophy has been, and continues to be, practiced within multiple traditions of inquiry, in many different ways, and in many different languages. We will examine and critique some of the ways in which "comparison" has been used, as well as examine arguments that comparison across traditions is, in fact, impossible. Although most of our attention will be focused on written academic research, we will also attend to the challenges and benefits of interacting directly with philosophers in other countries and cultures.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Prereq: None

CHUM371 Afro-pessimism, Gender, and Performance

This class engages African and African diaspora critical thought and aesthetic production (dance, visual art, performance art, installation, film) to think about colonial dispossession, objectification, and reparation. We will address topics such as the repatriation of artifacts and other ephemera taken from Europe's colonies that are housed in the archives of European cultural institutions. The objects in question have been described as either artwork, artifacts, or anthropological fetish objects (depending on which field one engages with). How can we rethink our understanding of objecthood as irreducible to "inanimate" things but as also signaling a regime of imperial domination and enslavement that violently turned African personality into a status of objecthood? What does it mean to think about the object (broadly defined) in relation to loss and the (im)possibilities of repatriation and reparation? How does the Black performer's body's disappearance/remains endow the Western art institution? The course will encourage students to think about repatriation as well as certain losses that can neither be repaired/repatriated nor evidenced in conventional ways. In those instances, how do contemporary critical thinkers and/as contemporary artists help us rethink loss, mourning, as well as the promises and ends of reparation? The assigned readings offer ways to think about colonial archives not merely as neutral repositories of past events, but also as performances; as enactments of power, aesthetic value judgment, and hierarchical arrangements of knowledge production. The theoretical, art historical, psychoanalytic, philosophical, and creative reading materials engage contemporary scholars', artists', and activists' response to both the recorded and ephemeral archives of Black dispossession. Students are encouraged to engage in events and workshops outside of the classroom, such as visiting library archives, attending performances, gallery exhibits, and film screenings.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: AFAM370, FGSS381, THEA373
Prereq: None

CHUM374 Abolition and Social Praxis

This course will examine some of the analyses of society, social power, and societal reform advanced and practiced by diverse activists who organize their work around the theme of abolition. Inspired by activist efforts to eliminate prisons and policing, abolition is here understood as an attempt to link a worldview that advocates for the disassembly of existing, oppressive social structures combined with efforts to generate new, more liberatory forms of social relationship in the here and now. As a form of activism, abolition thus brings utopian dreams to bear upon concrete practice, seeking to generate new structures of agency and pointing toward ways in which liberal notions of consent occlude deep forms of structural power and implicit constraint. Students will be asked to take on an activist project as part of the course.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: AMST374, FGSS374, SOC280
Prereq: None

CHUM376 Theorizing Subjection Beyond Contract and Consent

What modes of subjection does political life elicit from us, and how do they underpin and challenge our ideas of consent? Can we give genuine consent when we have already been subjected to parental authority? When we have unconscious desires we cannot avow? When we lack meaningful control over the norms that constitute our political, social, psychic lives? This class examines the centrality of the notion of consent to the liberal democratic order, and how it requires a prior mode of subjection that the liberal subject cannot knowingly or willingly consent to. In Unit 1, we read classic formulations of the liberal individual who consents to political rule (Locke, Hobbes, Rousseau). We look for the ways these theorists presuppose and disavow practices of subject formation that are beyond consent--parental authority, the informal authority of mores and norms, deception, precarity, ideology. We then read critiques of the social contract tradition that highlight the constitutive exclusions of liberalism, and ask how consent bears upon subjects that are constituted by the state as included others (Pateman, MacKinnon, West, Mills, Simplican). In Unit 2, we read critiques of the liberal subject that interrogate the possibility of genuine consent, examining issues of false consciousness (Marx, Marcuse), self-opacity and the unconscious (Freud, Benjamin), discursive constitution (Foucault), and performativity (Butler). We use these thinkers to interrogate the distinctions underpinning liberal notions of consent, such as autonomous and heteronomous, authentic and inauthentic, public and private. In Unit 3, we examine how the notion of consent is changing in in our current political moment, in which the liberal democratic state is waning, but the notion of consent persists, such as under neoliberalism (Brown, Feher, Berlant), sexual assault (Kessel, Halley, Murray), and right-wing movements (Grattan, Anker). We close by considering what might be alternatives to and reconfigurations of this model of consent (late Foucault, Maxwell).
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: GOVT356
Prereq: None

CHUM377 Worlding the World: Creation Myths from Ancient Greece to the Multiverse

This course will focus on two questions that have thwarted and enthralled scientists, philosophers, and theologians for millennia: Where have we come from? and Where are we going? By reading ancient Greek and early Christian sources alongside contemporary astrophysicists, we will witness the reconfigured resurrection of some very old debates about the creation and unmaking of the world. Is the universe eternal, or was it created? Is it finite or infinite? Destructible or indestructible? Linear or cyclical? And is ours the only universe, or are there others?

The semester will be divided into four sections. The first will explore the dominant, or "inflationary," version of the big bang hypothesis in relation to the Christian doctrine of creation. The second will consider the possibility that the whole universe might be a negligible part of a vast "multiverse" in conversation with the early Greek atomists, who posited an extra-cosmic space teeming with other worlds. The third will explore contemporary cyclical cosmologies--that is, theories that posit a rebirth of the cosmos out of its fiery destruction--in relation to early Stoic philosophy and cross-cultural cyclic mythologies. The fourth will explore quantum cosmologies, in which the universe fragments into parallel branches each time a particle "decides" upon a position. We will examine these varied cosmologies of multiplicity, not with a view toward adjudicating among them, but toward pointing out their mythic and ontological genealogies and consequences.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: THEA377
Prereq: None

CHUM378 Decolonizing Indigenous Gender and Sexuality

This seminar focuses on the politics of decolonization in Indigenous contexts with regard to gender and sexuality. The seminar examines a variety of settler colonial contexts in North America and Oceania. Beginning with an historical exploration of gender and colonialism, students will examine how colonial processes, along with other forms of domination that include racializing technologies, have transformed gender and sexuality through the imposition of definitions and models of normative (often binary) gender subjectivity and relations, "proper" sexual behavior, preoccupations with "sexual deviance," sexual expression as a territory to be conquered, legacies of control, legal codification, and commodification. We will then assess how diverse modes of self-determination struggles negotiate gender and sexual decolonization, including feminist interventions in nationalist productions that sustain masculinist and homophobic agendas. In relation to these dynamics, we will study the growing body of work on Native feminisms and decolonial feminisms, as well as Two-Spirit and queer Indigenous studies.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: AMST378
Prereq: None

CHUM381 Student Fellowship

The student fellowship entails full participation in the lectures and colloquia. Student fellows read, hear, and converse on the common themes. They are to work on their research projects and give a presentation to the Center for Humanities fellows.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Prereq: None

CHUM383 Reading Between Freedom and Necessity

Mostly the culture of literacy has taken shape within a realm of freedom, seemingly distant from the needs of the body and the demands of sustenance. At the same time, the world represented within so much of the world's narratives, both truth and fiction, has been saturated in struggle and deprivation. In this seminar we will try to make some sense of this juxtaposition, freedom on one side and necessity on the other, to explore the flip side of the drama of revolution in modern times. For us, revolutions, those great upheavals that unite hope with practical action, will be the background against which we will try to understand the gravity and persistence of dispossession itself: the pull of past or residual forms of unfreedom in the sphere of cultural representation, within and against new or emerging expressions of emancipation, themselves accompanied or countered in modern times by ever-novel styles of exploitation.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL382
Prereq: None

CHUM385 Race, Capital, and Sexual Consent

Race, Capital, and Sexual Consent will focus on the early 19th century through to the Progressive Era. It will explore racialized sexual markets, from what Black feminist historian Adrienne Davis has called "The Sexual Economy of American Slavery," to the Victorian-era marriage market, to continuing and emerging sex work and pleasure economies. This course will focus on areas of overlap, tension, and reinforcement within and between these racialized sexual markets. Fundamental to this class will be the question of if/how sexual consent is configured within these markets, and what this means in the broader evolution of American liberalism in the 19th- and early 20th-century U.S.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: FGSS385, AFAM385, HIST332
Prereq: None

CHUM389 The Mediterranean Archipelago: Literary and Cultural Representations

"Islands which have / never existed / have made their ways / onto maps nonetheless" (Nicholas Hasluck). In this course, we study Mediterranean islands as geographical, textual, and metaphorical spaces. We focus on specific islands--both fictional and real--as case studies for the aesthetic, political, and metaphysical implications of insularity, while also aiming to present the Mediterranean as a spatial, historical, and cultural network of relationality and conflict. Elaborating upon Predrag Matvejevitc's statement that "the Mediterranean is not only geography," we approach Mediterranean insularity not only in cartographical representations (from Greek geographers to Arab cartographers), but also as poetic topos (from Ariosto's Island of Alcina to Goethe's Capri), narrative stratagem (from Homer's Phaeacia to Boccaccio's Rhodes), literary protagonist (from Deledda's Sardinia to Murgia's Sardinia), political concept (from Plato's Atlantis to Campanella's Taprobane), and existential condition (from Cervantes's Cyprus to Cavafy's Ithaca). We engage in a diachronic and synchronic exploration of Mediterranean islands' inherent dialectic between resistance and occupation, identity and assimilation, marginality and integration, zoological extinction and speciation, inbreeding and metissage, autochthony and allogeny, linguistic conservatism and creoleness, territorial boundedness and internal division. Our approach will also be archipelagic and include methods and concepts from historical linguistics and dialectology to diplomatic history and postcolonial poetics.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: COL389, MDST360, WLIT340, ITAL289
Prereq: ITAL112

CHUM391 Unsovereign Elements, Caribbean Poetics

This course offers portals and obstacles of anticolonial imagination through studies of Caribbean literary and conceptual forms and life ways, imperial cartographies of Caribbean lands and waterways, as well as that which has historically eluded those cartographic schema of space, property, and labor. We will focus on historical marronage, foodways, maritime law, naval and commercial cartography, theories of sovereignty, and the "unsovereign elements" (i.e., especially water and wind) in the ecosystems of unruly Caribbean places. By "Caribbean places," the professor means the archipelago (of many smaller archipelagos), and a both rhizomic and guarded site of imaginaries, knowledges, expressive forms, wars, massacres, invasions, and epistemes partly produced by and lodged in particular ecological formations. Conceptually, the course thinks from Caribbean studies, Black critical theory, Black studies, as well as some recent conversations between the latter and North American Indigenous Studies. The historical frame of the course begins circa 1492 and will hover into the 19th century era not only of emancipation, but also of abduction, re-enslavement, and anti-emancipation, partly through "contemporary" Caribbean literature, in addition to primary, historical texts and maps.

We will study digitized versions of maps held at the John Carter Brown Library, Archivo de Indias, and in other archives, as well as primary texts of different genres (e.g., pilotes, ledgers, letters, legal meditations), including the writings of Christopher Columbus, Moreau de Saint Mery, and Baudry des Lozieres. The guiding, inter- and un-disciplinary sources for this course's anticolonial imagination come from Colin Dayan, Sara Johnson, Evelynne Trouillot, Sylvia Wynter, Robin Derby, Joiri Minaya, Maryse Conde, Alejo Carpentier, Edouard Glissant, Jacques Derrida, Beatriz Santiago Munoz, Demetrius Eudell, Anne Eller, Dixa Ramírez D'Oleo, and others.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CHUM
Identical With: ENGL391, AMST381, AFAM391
Prereq: None

CHUM401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHUM402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHUM407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CHUM408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CHUM409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHUM410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHUM411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHUM412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHUM420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

CHUM491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CHUM492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT