Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

This course introduces students to concepts, theories, and methods of cultural anthropology. Lectures, readings, and audiovisual materials invite critical analysis of broader themes in contemporary anthropology, such as the nature of culture, the problematic notions of social evolution and progress, and the negotiation of power within and among diverse peoples.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH113 Care and Suffering

In this introductory course, we will explore the production and representation of human suffering, in addition to the modes of care deployed by healers, kin groups, aid workers, and state actors to alleviate the suffering of others. We will begin by mastering dominant approaches within anthropology for studying affliction. We will then examine case examples of bodies in distress. We will discover that suffering is inherently social: it is shared, socially produced, and communicated through socially learned and sanctioned means. Suffering is also social in the sense that it often begs a moral response. With that in mind, we will turn our attention to different regimes of care--such as experimental, pharmaceutical, and humanitarian care--and explore their limitations, paradoxes, and transformative possibilities. Taken as a whole, the course will invite students to question the creation and reproduction of suffering, while at the same time critically reflecting on dominant norms and forms of "doing good."

As a first-year seminar (FYS), this course will also guide and support students in fostering skills as academic researchers and writers. We will start from the position that college-level academic writing is its own genre, distinct from the kind of writing typically taught in high school, and that the steps required to hone this skill are not always transparent, self-evident, or without challenges. As such, the course will include detailed instruction, regular in-class writing exercises, and three take-home writing assignments designed to introduce students to the main principles of successful academic writing.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: SISP113
Prereq: None

ANTH150 Indigenous Middletown: Native Histories of the Wangunk Indian People

Students will be introduced to the new field of settler colonial studies, the rapidly transforming field of critical indigenous studies, along with Native American history and historiography addressing southern New England. Taking up a decolonizing methodological approach, the class will focus on the sparsely documented history of the Wangunk Indian Tribe, the indigenous people of the place we call "Middletown," also known as Mattabesett. The Wangunk people, part of the Algonquin cultural group, historically presided over both sides of the Connecticut River in present-day Middletown and Portland, while their traditional territory reached as far north as Wethersfield and Chatham. Although regarded as "extinct" by settlers in the aftermath of King Philip's War, 1675-1678, the Wangunk continue to live into the 21st century.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: Cr/U
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST150
Prereq: None

ANTH165 Between Journalism and Anthropology

This first-year seminar (FYS) course will introduce students to how journalism and anthropology make their subjects vis-à-vis the broader significance of the knowledge they create and their publics. Using journalistic and anthropological accounts, we will consider how and why Haiti has long been regarded as something of an "oddity" within the Caribbean and the world. Branded the "nightmare republic" since it gained independence in 1804, in the public sphere Haiti remains conceptually incarcerated with clichés and stereotypes that obscure understanding of its complex role in global history. Attention will be paid to the plethora of coverage of the 2010 earthquake, current conditions, and possible futures. Our ultimate aim is to consider the limits of each discipline to explore the myriad possibilities in anthro-journalism.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH201 Key Issues in Black Feminism (FGSS Gateway)

This course surveys key issues in the historical development of black feminist thoughts and practices through readings of canonical works especially from the 1980s and '90s that contribute to this extensive body of knowledge. Our aim is to engage black feminist and womanist theorists, activists and artists from the diaspora who are exploring intersections of race, class, sexuality, religion, and other indices of identity affecting their daily lives. To that end, we will take an interdisciplinary approach to unpacking the historical tensions and politics and poetics in theory/practice, representation/self-making and expression/performance. We will also examine more recent turns in #BlackLivesMatter, #SayHerName and #BlackGirlMagic and conclude with Post-Zora Interventions-- feminist interrogations on the borders anthropology, art, and activism.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AFAM
Identical With: FGSS217
Prereq: None

ANTH202 Paleoanthropology: The Study of Human Evolution

Paleoanthropology is the study of human origins, of how we evolved from our apelike ancestors into our modern form with our modern capabilities. Drawing on both biological anthropology (the study of fossils, living primates, anatomy, genetics, and human variation) and archaeology (the study of material culture, such as tools, art, food remains), this course will examine what we know about our own evolutionary past and how we know it. The history of paleoanthropology--how our views of our past have changed--will also be explored. The course will include hands-on laboratory sessions utilizing fossil casts, stone tools, and other materials from the archaeology and anthropology collections.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: ARCP202
Prereq: None

ANTH203 Sex, Money, and Power: Anthropology of Intimacy and Exchange

Sex and money--intimacy and economy--are often imagined to occupy distinct and separate spheres. Sex and intimacy are located in the private or domestic realm, in spaces of leisure, feelings, care, and personal connections. Money and economy, on the other hand, are purportedly public, located in the market and tied to labor, rationality, and impersonal (non)-relations. This course brings these spheres together, focusing on the links, exchanges, and circuits between the intimate and the economic in diverse cultural contexts across the Americas. Case studies will be drawn from sex work and tourism; marketing and pornography; reproduction, domestic labor, transnational adoption; marriage; class and sexual lifestyle; labor and carework; the global market in organs and body parts; outsourced surrogacy; sex stores and commodities; and sexual activism and identity politics. We will be centrally concerned with the relationship between economic, cultural, and political formations and with the differences race, ethnicity, nation, class, gender, and sexuality make. Throughout, we will ask, How do practices and bodies accrue value? When are intimacies--sexual and social--commoditized? How have transnational flows complicated relationships between sex and money? How do these intersections constrain and/or empower people? And, finally, who benefits from such arrangements, and who does not?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: FGSS223, AMST228
Prereq: None

ANTH204 Approaches to Archaeology

Archaeology is the study of the past through its material remains. This course will introduce students to a range of approaches that archaeologists use to interrogate material culture (artifacts and other physical remains) and, in some cases, written records, to present interpretive reconstructions of past human history, societies, cultures, and practices. The course includes archaeological approaches to prehistoric cultures through to ancient, medieval, and early modern societies.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ARCP
Identical With: ARCP204, ARHA201, CCIV204
Prereq: None

ANTH205 Future Visions: Temporality and the Politics of Change

What is the time of political change? This course explores alternative temporal frameworks embraced by artists, writers, activists, and interdisciplinary scholars from diverse social and cultural locations. We ask, How do concepts of temporality help us understand, resist, contest, and transform prevailing social orders?

We will begin by assembling some conceptual tools for understanding the relationship of time to historical change and to racial, sexual, cultural, and national difference. Drawing on psychoanalysis, literary theory, history, trauma studies, anthropology, African American studies, queer theory, feminist studies, and postcolonial studies, we will explore the telos of modernity and narratives of liberal progress. We will then consider some of the critical and oppositional possibilities of being out of sync with dominant temporal frameworks, asking, Are there other, perhaps more livable, temporalities? Next, we will consider the possibilities for memory and memorialization to work against historical forgetting and cultural amnesia--alongside the ways historical pasts might be appropriated to serve nationalist ends. Finally, we will turn to the question of the future as found in meditations on utopias and dystopias; in political, cultural, and ecological justice movements; in ideologies of newness; and in rhetorics of apocalypse.

Our readings include three texts that highlight the form and futures of political change: Theresa Hak Kyung Cha's Dictee, an avant-garde text that uses multiple genres (poetry, autobiography, history, photography, etc.) juxtaposing historical trauma and aesthetic experimentation; Kim Fortun's Advocacy After Bhopal: Environmentalism, Disaster, New Global Orders, an experimental ethnography of environmental disaster and its aftermath; and Octavia E. Butler's Kindred, a speculative fiction about time travel and the memory of slavery. As we consider social change, revolutions, and new "ends" and beginnings, students are invited to explore current social justice movements.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST266, FGSS266
Prereq: None

ANTH207 Anthropology of Time

In this course, we will examine time as a cultural phenomenon. At once absolute and highly malleable, one of the objective dimensions of our existence and experienced with such subjective variation, time is a central concern for many different cultural worlds, even as those different worlds render time entirely differently from each other. Time is also a particular pre-occupation of anthropology, both as a concept and a significant methodological and ethical concern (as it is embedded in ideas like progress, evolution, development, the "backward"). Accordingly, this course will track between ethnographic explorations of different cultural accounts of time - what time is, what it does, and what it should be - and methodological and theoretical conceptualizations of temporality, futurity, and the dangers of "freezing" cultural systems and actors in static time-frames.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH208 Crafting Ethnography

This course is an introduction to the craft of ethnographic research and writing. In the first half, we will explore some of the research methodologies anthropologists use to understand, interpret, and analyze culture. Each student will choose an ethnographic field project for the semester and practice ethnographic methods (participant observation, interviewing, virtual ethnography, auto-ethnography, visual representation, and more). In the second half of the course, students will begin to write their ethnography, practicing writing in a variety of styles and genres (including realist, reflexive, dialogic, engaged, and experimental). Guided, weekly peer workshops throughout the semester will give students a chance to hash out and talk through questions of ethics, positionality, representational politics, and the improvisational felicities and challenges that arise during fieldwork and writing. This course will give students a solid grasp of ethnographic methods and how anthropologists construct ethnographies. It is ideal preparation for ethnographic theses and essays during senior year.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: ANTH101

ANTH209 Tradition & Testimony: Protecting Native American Sacred Lands, Ancestral Remains, & Cultural Items

This course will explore the historic genesis of present-day U.S. and international policies toward Native American peoples and other indigenous communities. In addition, studies will include traditional indigenous and tribal perspectives, investigate indigenous-specific origin stories and the connections these stories have with historic events and places, and take a hard look at repatriation policies. Students will investigate several case studies involving current issues Native American communities are facing in repatriation and protecting sacred places, both local and national.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: ARCP209
Prereq: None

ANTH210 Haiti: Between Anthropology and Journalism

This course will examine how anthropology and journalism make their subjects vis-à-vis the broader significance of the knowledge they create and their publics. Using the works of anthropologists and journalists, we will consider how and why Haiti has long been regarded as something of an oddity within the Caribbean and the world. Branded the "nightmare republic" since it gained independence in 1804, in the public sphere Haiti remains conceptually incarcerated with clichés and stereotypes that obscure understanding of its complex role in global history. Attention will be paid to the 2010 earthquake, current conditions, and possible futures. Our ultimate aim is to explore the myriad possibilities of anthro-journalism.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: AFAM201
Prereq: None

ANTH211 Health and Social Justice

How does health become a matter of social justice? In the context of a growing prominence of activist and advocacy groups that work toward health and justice, this course will consider: how and why health advocacy groups emerge; what goals, values, and assumptions inform their work; and how they use science and other cultural resources to make claims. We will also consider the implications of activist efforts for challenging structural inequalities, state and corporate power, and the cultural authority of science and medicine. Case studies will cover a range of geographical sites in the U.S. and abroad and represent the diverse forms that such collectives assume. We will consider, for example, groups that mobilize around broad constituencies (e.g., women's health) or in response to specific health threats (e.g., cancer, HIV, and toxic exposures), as well as those more broadly committed to social justice, equity, and "health for all." In addition to exploring the above questions, readings and class discussion will be designed for students to master some of the concepts and ideas central to medical anthropology, science and technology studies, and allied fields, such as embodiment, medicalization, biosociality, hegemony, citizenship, and the production of scientific and lay knowledge. The role of the scholar-activist will also be addressed, including the particular ethical and methodological questions that arise when scholars seek to combine research and activist agendas.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: SISP211
Prereq: None

ANTH213 Indigenous Anthropology

In this course, we will explore what anthropology looks like from an indigenous perspective. Focusing on four significant texts by indigenous anthropologists, we will explore concepts of indigeneity, mobility, gender, DNA, and indigenous rights and sovereignty as they are articulated between anthropology and indigenous studies. At the same time, we will examine how anthropological research and writing can be conducted from the perspective of the historically colonized as opposed to the colonizers, navigating the ambiguities of anthropology's own legacy as it is rearticulated by scholars from diverse positionalities and perspectives.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH225 Rightwing Movements in the Age of Trump

This course explores the socio-cultural, ideological, and affective contours of contemporary American far-right political culture. Course readings theorize the nature of 'rightwing' politics in general, provide ethnographic insights into particular movements and policy platforms, and trace the rising impact of rightwing attitudes in the age of Trump. We focus on connections and disconnections between a range of communities that comprise the so-called 'big tent' of the American right, including white supremacists, free market libertarians, Christian fundamentalists, and conspiracy theorists. Over the course of the semester, students will gain conceptual tools for better understanding what is at stake for these groups and how those stakes shape their political practices and goals. We will also reflect on how this knowledge might shape our own political viewpoints and tactics moving forward.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: AMST231
Prereq: None

ANTH227 Ethnographies in Medicine

Biomedicine looks different in different places. Biotechnologies change under new moral frameworks. The same pharmaceutical pill can offer freedom to some and evoke colonialism in others. And in some contexts hunger is more pressing than curing a specific disease. How do we go about challenging our biomedical assumptions and understanding medicine in context? Medical anthropologists have relied on the art and science of ethnography to provide cross-cultural accounts of health and healing that are accessible, provocative, and timely. In this writing-intensive course, we will read exemplary ethnographies in medical anthropology to explore the intersection of medicine, culture, and narrative text. We will explore four themes that cover provocative discourses in the field: the challenges of participant observation during vulnerable encounters with sickness and disease; regimes of power; local-global encounters; and food, eating, and the gendered body.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-WRCT
Identical With: WRCT226
Prereq: None

ANTH230 Anthropology of Cities

This course is an introduction to the practice of urban anthropology. Attention is placed on the intellectual challenges recent local and global urbanization trends present to us in our attempts to think and write about cities today. We will reflect upon the production of space and place, the creation of "other spaces" through borders and limits, and the making of meaning through everyday practices and experiences in the city. We will consider how cities become foremost spaces for the exercise and contestation of power, for social cohabitation and conflict, and for cultural creation and repression. Class discussions will also focus on fieldwork methods and problems of ethnographic representation and writing in preparation for a research project that will culminate in an urban mini-ethnography.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH231 Post-Zora Interventions: Art, Activism and Anthropology

Inspired by the pedagogies of Paolo Freire, this experimental course situates the pioneer ethnographer, novelist, and playwright Zora Neale Hurston at the avant-garde of innovative approaches in anthropology. In addition to exploring Hurston's textual and performative oeuvre within and outside of the discipline, we will also examine anthropologists who turn to the expressive arts to make their works as well as artists who deploy ethnographic methods and are inspired by anthropology as their subject. Paying particular attention to black feminists projects produced at the intersections of art and activism, we aim to consider the broader context within which these occur. In the process, we will critically question the aesthetics of politics and politics of aesthetics as we contemplate the imperatives and impulses of those who challenge and subvert conventional ethnographic and creative practices to make a case for post-Zora interventions in the "urgency of now" of these times.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH233 Global Queer Studies

This course explores global experiences of LGBT/Q life, bringing an explicitly transnational lens to a field too often dominated by U.S.-centered perspectives.

Drawing on queer ethnography and film, we will explore the contours of queer and trans life around the globe, from the lives of gay men in Indonesia to Muslim yan daudu in Nigeria, gay tourism in post-Revolutionary Cuba, queer mati work among working-class Afro-Surinamese women, lesbian activism in India, LGBT asylum claims in Canada, the queer art of Carnival in Trinidad and Tobago, the everyday lives of lalas (lesbians) in China, and and the transnational lives of Filipino gay men in New York. Our aim is to expand Western categories and concepts of sexuality, gender, identity, and desire (both hetero- and homo-normative), and to understand how sexual/gendered identities, cultures, and politics are shaped by colonialism, imperialism, racialization, migration, transnational media, and global capitalism.

This semester will feature a lecture/film series as part of our course, with visiting scholars Erin Durban-Albright (on postcolonial homophobia in Haiti), Martin Manalansan (on QTPOC Filipino lives), and filmmaker Harjant Gill (on gender/sexuality in India).
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST233, FGSS233
Prereq: None

ANTH240 Hipsters

This course will focus on the contemporary hipster subculture after examining a critical genealogy and racial history of the origins of the concept. From black jazz artists and zoot-suitors in the 1940s who defined "hip" and "cool," to the post-World War II burgeoning literary scene of the Beat Generation that codified the figure of the hipster as an American bohemian strangled by social conformity, there has been a cultural politics of being "in the know." Derived from the term used to describe these earlier movements, the term "hipster" reappeared in the 1990s and became especially conspicuous in the 2000s to the present. Today's hipsters are generally associated with whiteness, indie music, a vintage fashion sensibility, liberal political views, organic and artisanal foods, as well as racial gentrification in urban neighborhoods in Brooklyn and select cities such as Portland, OR and San Francisco. Perhaps curiously, members of this subculture typically disassociate themselves from this cultural category, as outsiders often use the term hipster as a pejorative. In an attempt to understand why hipsters differentiate their actions from the hipster stigma, students will study the contemporary discourse about hipsters, along with a historical analysis of the term and its use in popular culture to get a better understanding of race, class, gender, and the commodification of style. Other topics for exploration include stereotypes, authenticity debates, hipster racism, so-called "blipsters," the death of irony, hipster chic, "hipster run-off," the resentment of hipsters, and forecasts of "the end of the hipster."
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST240
Prereq: None

ANTH242 Other Worlds Are Possible: Life Against and Beyond Neoliberal Logics

This four-week intensive course examines radical challenges, in theory and on the ground, to mainstream neoliberal capitalism and development strategies promoted by international organizations such as World Bank and the IMF. After the 1980s, considered by many as "the lost decade" of development, some scholars and practitioners declared the development enterprise as fundamentally wrong: It was a misguided and violent neocolonial project that could never provide the answer to inequality and poverty. These radical critics argued for building a "post-development" era. In this course, we look at the conceptual history of the term "post-development" and also examine what post-development life looks like on the ground, among dispossessed communities. We will focus on lived and imagined challenges to neoliberal capitalism. We spend the first week at Wesleyan, brushing up on the critical ideas and movements that have emerged out of Mexico (and Latin America, broadly) over the past four decades in reaction to mainstream development discourse. We will then explore these ideas and lived alternatives in Oaxaca, Mexico. We will spend three weeks learning about and working with marginalized communities that are rejecting capitalist development and building and experimenting with living a "good life" (buen vivir) on their own terms.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 2.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH243 Medical Anthropology

Situated at the intersection of the clinical and social sciences, medical anthropology seeks to understand bodies, afflictions, healing, and care in cross-cultural contexts. This course serves as an introduction to the exciting field of medical anthropology. Students will begin by mastering dominant approaches within medical anthropology for studying the body as a site of meaning, a moral battleground, a biosocial entity, an object of regulation and control, and a tool of resistance and change. We will then turn our attention to different kinds of bodies in distress and to the therapeutic responses they invoke (or fail to invoke) from healers, doctors, kin groups, aid workers, and state actors. Of particular concern will be those aspects of healing that challenge commonsense notions of how therapies work and where they may fall short. Specific concepts and topics to be covered include illness narratives, idioms of distress, structural and symbolic violence, culture-bound syndromes, nature/nurture debates, ritual healing, high-tech medicine, and humanitarianism.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH244 Television: The Domestic Medium

Of all the mass media, television is the most intimately associated with domestic and familial life. Its installation in American homes over the postwar decade coincided with a revival of family life that encouraged an emphasis on private over public leisure. Most television is still watched at home, where viewing practices are interwoven with domestic routines and provide a site for negotiating family and gender relations. Television production is shaped at several levels by the images broadcasters and advertisers have of viewers' domestic lives: Broadcast schedules reflect socially conditioned assumptions about the gendered division of family roles; a common televisual mode of address uses a conversational style in which performers present themselves to viewers as friends or members of the family; and families or surrogate families figure prominently in the content of programming across a wide range of genres, including sitcoms, primetime dramas, daytime soaps, and talk shows. Sitcoms, in particular, have responded to and mediated historical shifts in family forms and gender relations over the past 50 years, and they will be a focus in this course. We will explore how television has both shaped and responded to larger cultural discourses about family and gender from the postwar era into the 21st century.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: AMST253, FILM349, FGSS243
Prereq: None

ANTH249 From Metropolis to Megalopolis

What is the urban experience today? Are the old European metropolises, the global cities of New York or Tokyo, and the new megalopolises of the Global South commensurate entities? What are the theoretical and methodological challenges we face in thinking about "the urban" today, given the vastly different histories, trajectories, and physical and social realities of cities around the world? This course is an introductory and interdisciplinary survey of urban theory. We will critically examine "the city" as a transhistorical category of analysis and focus on issues of anthropological concern regarding the experience and epistemology of urbanization and urban life. No prior background in urban studies is expected, but an interest in theory is a must.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH259 Development, Disasters, and Beyond

Development is one of the most important ideas of our time--it is a powerful way of organizing the world (Third and First Worlds, or North and South) and intervening in it to bring about certain kinds of cultural, political, and economic transformations. Our purpose in this course is to critically examine the ideas, practices, institutions, and effects of development through an anthropological lens. While development is certainly a potent way to exert power over and regulate Third World Others, it is also a fiercely contested space of struggle and a discourse of entitlement. Rather than position development as all bad or all good, this course aims to keep this messiness of development in focus and approaches it both as a project of rule and a project of rights. We will take up specific topics such as neoliberalism and structural adjustment, humanitarianism, dams, environment, and empowerment.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH267 Anthropology of Black Religions in the Americas

This course examines Afro-Creole religions and cultural expressions in selected communities throughout the Atlantic world. How were religious communities created under colonial domination? Under what conditions were religions shaped, and what shapes did they take? How are African-based religions produced through aesthetics and the ritual arts of spiritual talk and sermons, song, dance, drumming, and medicine-making? How do these religions continue to survive, thrive, and, in some cases, grow in the current historical period? This course will pay special attention to the yearly ritual cycle and its attendant festivals: Christmas, carnivals, Lent, Easter, saints' days, feasts, and pilgrimages, as well as the emergent spiritual and aesthetic traditions such as Capoeira and Rara. We will study Orisha religions such as La Regla de Ocha, or Lukumi, in Cuba and the Latino U.S.; Candomble in Brazil; Vodou in Haiti; and Garifuna traditions and spiritism in Puerto Rico.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: RELI268, AFAM387, LAST268
Prereq: None

ANTH268 North America Before Columbus

Sometime before the end of the Pleistocene, people living in Siberia or along the Pacific Coast of Asia traveled east and found an hemisphere of arctic, temperate, and tropical climates uninhabited by other humans. Over the next 12,000 years or more, populations diversified into, and thrived in, a range of environments--the last great experiment in human adaptation. This course will follow that process as it unfolded across the continent of North America, from the earliest Paleoindians through 1491. Particular emphasis will be on the nature and timing of the colonization(s) of North America from Asia, the impact of environmental diversity across the continent, and the rise of complex societies.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: ENVS268, ARCP268
Prereq: None

ANTH269 Race, Incarceration, and Citizenship: The New Haven Model

This course will explore the elements of local responses to contemporary criminal justice issues, drawing on current research projects in New Haven, Connecticut. The course will explore a variety of promising practices, which emphasize community engagement and individual citizenship over incarceration and punishment. Topics will include evidence-based practices to reduce criminal recidivism, mental health issues in the criminal justice system, treatment engagement, and the creation of valued roles in the community. Students will have the opportunity to participate in federal research studies.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AFAM
Identical With: AFAM269, CSPL269, AMST268
Prereq: None

ANTH279 Eating Others: Histories and Cultures of Animal Edibility

For many people, animals form a significant and cherished part of their diet. Indeed, humans have used other animals as sources of nutrients for hundreds of thousands of years. What can these animal-based dietary practices tell us about humans and their relationships with other animals? Of course, these inter-species relationships have varied as radically across time and cultures as the dietary practices that have shaped them. To better understand some of these practices and the relationships they generate, this course will explore the following questions: How did animal-based food practices develop from pre-domestication to the contemporary era of industrialized animal agriculture? How have cultural categories of "edibility" developed in different cultural contexts? What is meat, and how does it differ from inedible flesh? How has gender, class, race, sexuality, and other categories of difference intersected with and shaped animal consumption practices in different times and contexts? How has animal consumption shaped and been shaped by animal ethics, philosophy, and scientific knowledge production? How has large-scale animal consumption contributed to the ecological crises of the Anthropocene, and how have these in turn affected animal consumption practices? What is the future of animal-based food?

This course will use ethnographies, historical and legal analyses, and philosophical inquiries to examine the histories and cultures of animal edibility. Specifically, it will focus on topics including human evolution, animal domestication, slaughter practices, industrialized animal agriculture, indigenous ecological ontologies, hunting, dairy and egg consumption, cannibalism, cultural conflicts over the edibility of specific species, and recent technological innovations that can produce animal products without animals.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ENVS
Identical With: ENVS279
Prereq: None

ANTH286 Queer Activism and Radical Scholarship: Beyond Theory vs. Practice

This course explores the relationship between scholarship and activism, with a focus on intersectional radical queer scholarship and activism--queer left, black radical, trans, immigration, prison abolition, and sex work--in the United States. We will aim to connect the too-often bifurcated realms of academia and activism, theory and practice, research and action, so that we might think through the political stakes of knowledge-making in and outside the so-called "ivory tower," explore interdisciplinary methodologies we might use to study and learn from (and with) activists (including ethnography, oral history, and community archive), and gain insight into the histories and current realities of social justice movements, campus activisms, the work of a radical imagination, art and activism, and the impasse of the political present. To put their theory into practice, students will undertake a semester-long radical research project on a queer issue or activist organization--past or present--of their choice.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST286, FGSS286
Prereq: None

ANTH290 Style and Identity in Youth Cultures

This course focuses on young people's engagements with commercially provided culture and their implications for identity formation. We begin in the postwar United States, when producers of symbolic goods, such as movies, music, and clothes, began aggressively tailoring products for young people; over the rest of the 20th century and into the 21st, new youth-oriented cultural commodities and sites of consumption have been used by young people in diverse ways to define themselves in relationships to adult society and to other young people. We will examine young people's intensifying involvement with the cultural market, with attention to both the diversity of youth-cultural formations that have emerged within the United States and to the global circulation of Euro-American youth culture. Using case studies, we will consider the ways in which young people's consumption practices have both reinforced and transgressed intersecting boundaries of class, race, gender, and nationality. An overarching concern in the course will be to assess whether or to what extent particular cultural practices may help prepare young people for positions of privilege, reconcile them to structural disadvantages, or provide them with resources to challenge the dominant society.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: AMST290
Prereq: None

ANTH295 Theory 1: Beyond me, Me, ME: Reflexive Anthropology

Theory 1 and Theory 2 are core courses for the major, designed to elucidate historical influences on contemporary anthropological theory. While precise topics may vary from year to year, the overall goal of the courses remains the same: to familiarize students with the main traditions from which the discipline of anthropology emerged and to explore the diverse ways in which contemporary anthropological practice defines itself both with and against them.

This semester our topic will be reflexive/reflective anthropology. We chart the historical development of the field from the making of fieldwork memoirs to its current formulations in more creative ethnographies. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of the interpretive turn speared by Clifford Geertz in the 1970s that advocated the blurring of different genres of writing, which became a feature in contemporary cultural anthropology. The reflexive turn that followed over a decade later demanded ethnographers turn their gaze onto the self to answer questions about the making of otherness, power relations, and representation. Researchers began to consider their position vis-à-vis their intended subjects in the making of ethnographic projects to reinvent and decolonize anthropology. This emphasis has led ethnographers (especially feminists and minorities in the discipline) to engage in more expository writing that further obscured the boundary between social science and literature, which the discipline has historically occupied and continually struggles with. In so doing, they brought particular attention especially to the contested politics in the discipline.

This course explores the fundamental features and various approaches to reflexive/reflective work, its challenges and possibilities, and its fervent critics, as well as its embrace by other disciplines. Our ultimate aim is to deconstruct what is the personal and how it has been used to successfully access the social. In the end, we will put theory into practice and produce a significant piece of reflective writing.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: ANTH101

ANTH296 Theory 2: Anthropology of Time

Theory 1 and Theory 2 are core courses for the major, designed to elucidate historical influences on contemporary anthropological theory. While precise topics may vary from year to year, the overall goal of the courses remains the same: to familiarize students with the main traditions from which the discipline of anthropology emerged and to explore the diverse ways in which contemporary anthropological practice defines itself both with and against them.

In this course, we will examine anthropology's integral (and often fraught) relationship with time. The course is divided into two major segments. In our first half, we will explore the philosophical backstory of time as a particular--and, perhaps, foundational--category of human perception and experience. We will then trace how classic anthropology attempted to pick up these debates via core anthropological concerns with relativism, with cultural particularity, and with the social origins of perception.

With these canonical foundations in place, we will turn in our second segment to the myriad ways in which the concern with time infuses contemporary anthropology. Here we will move from questions of anthropological representation--especially the notorious critique of the "ethnographic present"--to recent anthropological attempts to discuss the cultural, social, and political work inherent in the production of different pasts, presents, and futures. As we will explore, though it may seem intimate and inherent, the production of time cannot be separated from ongoing histories of colonial domination, violence, resilience, innovation, and transformation.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: ANTH101

ANTH297 Precarity in America

This course explores the socio-cultural dimensions of inequality and the lived experiences of precarity in the contemporary United States from an ethnographic perspective. We examine how forms of neoliberal governance and economic restructuring come to bear on constructions of difference such as class, race, gender, and citizenship in ways that implicitly frame structural inequality as natural. Course readings highlight how Americans navigate and reckon with the various forms of inequality, precarity, and injustice they face in their daily lives.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH302 Critical Perspectives on the State

This course builds on Marxist, poststrucuturalist, feminist, anarchist, and cultural analyses to take a critical approach to the state--what it is and what it does. We will examine how the state is imagined by those who write about it and struggle against it. Where does the state begin? How do states act, and what are the consequences of these acts? How is rule consolidated and how are individuals and communities annexed to the project of rule? How do people engage with state acts and ideologies? We will read texts drawn from a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, feminist theory, political theory, philosophy, sociology, and geography, that examine the nature, everyday workings, and effects of state power. Drawing upon ethnographic examples from around the world, we will analyze how states are cultural artifacts that produce and regulate people's identities and bodies, reproduce social inequalities, and engender resistances of all sorts. Some of the topics we will discuss include bureaucracy, governmentality, the security state, the prison industrial complex, terror and militarism, law and justice, citizenship, democracy, refugees, anti-state movements, the "man" in the state, and welfare and post-welfare politics.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-FGSS
Identical With: FGSS302
Prereq: None

ANTH303 Ritual

Religion can be defined through beliefs or traditions or texts, but it always takes physical form through ritual. Ritual is the one universal in religion, but the question of how to understand ritual is possibly the most contested question in the study of religion. Can a ritual be read like a text? How do symbols produce effects, and how should we understand these effects? What is performative speech and how does it work? How does ritual behavior reflect and shape social relationships? This course introduces students to the major approaches to the study of ritual. The readings draw heavily, but not exclusively, on anthropological approaches to ritual, both classic texts and recent innovative approaches focusing on language and embodiment. Students will pick a ritual that they are interested in and will attend that ritual several times over the semester, conducting practical fieldwork exercises and applying the theories we read in class. The assignments culminate in a paper in which students will be required to analyze "their" ritual using the theory we read together in class. For these assignments, students are encouraged to define ritual broadly and creatively. The goal of the class is to gain an understanding of theoretical approaches to ritual by applying these theories to the social world around them.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: RELI307
Prereq: None

ANTH305 Infrastructure Matters: Power, Protest, and the Grid

This course is an anthropological exploration of infrastructure: the material grids that exist beneath society, economy, and culture. Infrastructures are the foundation upon which everyday life rests and depends; they also materialize foundational political ideals like freedom, progress, equality, and nature. Infrastructures such ports, rails, and roads embody the connections and disconnections of the globalized world. While meant to remain invisible, out of sight and out of mind, diverse infrastructures--from Michigan's corroded pipes to mega-dams on the River Nile--have become lightning rods for political protest and demands for justice, rights, and a good life. Taking an anthropological perspective, this course asks: why has infrastructure taken on vital importance to the modern nation-state? How is infrastructure implicated in the reproduction of racial, gendered, and classed identities and inequalities? What happens when infrastructures fail? Through multi-disciplinary readings and a course-long visual research project, this course challenges students to see the world beneath their feet in new ways and to trace the material connections that define and sustain modern life itself.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: ANTH101

ANTH306 Mobilizing Dance: Cinema, the Body, and Culture in South Asia

This course focuses on questions of "mobility"--cultural, social, and political--as embodied in two major cultural forms of South Asia, namely "classical" dance and cinema. Using Tamil cinema and Bharatanatyam dance as case studies, the course focuses on issues of colonialism and history, class, sexuality and morality, and globalization. The course places the notion of "flows of culture" at its center and examines historical, social, and aesthetic shifts in these art forms over the past 150 years.

The course is both studio- and lecture-based. It includes learning rudimentary Bharatanatyam technique, watching and analyzing film dance sequences, and participating in guest master classes in ancillary forms such as Bollywood dance and Kathak (North Indian classical dance). The studio portion of this course is for beginners, and no previous dance experience is necessary.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-DANC
Identical With: DANC307, FGSS307
Prereq: None

ANTH307 Indigenous Politics

This seminar will feature select historical moments, geographical sites, and case studies to explore the complexities of life for indigenous peoples in the Pacific Islands and North America subject to the authority of the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The course will examine indigenous peoples' varied political status in relation to questions of sovereignty and self-determination, structures of domination and resistance, and myriad forms of indigenous agency. Readings will focus on the recognition and assertion of collective rights, treaty rights and land claims, and self-governance under independent states' and international law. Films and guest lectures will complement the required texts.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-AMST
Identical With: AMST307
Prereq: None

ANTH308 Television Storytelling: The Conditions of Narrative Complexity

This course examines the industrial and cultural conditions for the development of relatively complex forms of storytelling in commercial U.S. television. Narrative complexity is a cross-generic phenomenon that emerged over the 1980s and has proliferated within an increasingly fragmented media environment. In class discussions and individual research projects, students will analyze particular programs in-depth, with attention to their industrial and social conditions of production, their aesthetic and ideological appeals, and the cultural tastes and viewing practices they reflect and promote. We will also consider how television studies has responded and contributed to the increased prestige of certain types of programs.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: AMST316, FILM319
Prereq: None

ANTH310 Ethnographic Encounters: The Americas between Darkness and the Good

Ethnography is both a primary research method and a genre of text within anthropology. As a research practice, it involves "deep hanging out" among a group of people in order to understand how they organize, make sense of, and live in the world. As a form of writing, it seeks to convey ethnographic insights to wider academic and non-academic audiences. Ethnographic texts are not mere descriptions of people's lives, however; they are deeply informed by theory, disciplinary trends, and the historical contexts within which they are produced.

This course will take a critical, hands-on approach to understanding ethnographic theory and practice. Beginning with canonical texts from the early 20th century, we will track how ethnographic standards have been defined, contested, modified, and reworked over the course of a century. As such, students will gain an appreciation for the range of ethnographic modalities, from salvage and interpretive ethnography to more recent approaches that privilege critical, morally engaged, postmodern, and postcolonial perspectives. While the temporal lens of the course will be broad, spanning almost a century, the geographical focus will be limited to the continents of North and South America. Thematically, we will explore three intersecting topics that are highly relevant--but by no means exclusive--to "the Americas." They include (1) colonialism, health, and subjectivity; (2) the workings of neoliberalism; and (3) ethnography between "darkness" and "the good." The hands-on portion of the course will allow students to apply what they learn during the semester toward designing and implementing their own ethnographic research project.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH312 Eat, Grow, Save: The Anthropology of Food and Justice

This course uses the lens of justice to examine the politics of food. We will look at the cultural and political-economic dynamics of food production and consumption, considering questions of taste, class, labor, marketing, and food sovereignty. We will also examine the environmental and social impact of food production and the consumption choices we make, from organic, to vegan, to animal proteins, to foraging and hunting. We will use a range of texts, including ethnographies, theory, film/documentary/TV shows, creative nonfiction, fiction, cookbooks, blogs, and magazine articles.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH314 How to Think Like an Archaeologist

Archaeologists think about material culture, time, society, technology, art, religion, food--almost everything. They think about things from particular disciplinary perspectives. This course will introduce students to some of the theoretical and methodological approaches employed by archaeologists. In addition to archaeological case studies, discussions will draw on everyday life at Wesleyan, in Middletown, and in students' home communities for examples illustrating archaeological perspectives. For example, Wilkie's STRUNG OUT ON ARCHAEOLOGY: AN INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH explains archaeological concepts with examples drawn from her experiences at Mardi Gras. The course is designed for non-majors with no background in archaeology, but it will be sufficiently rigorous to fulfill ARCP major requirements.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: ARCP314
Prereq: None

ANTH315 Anarchist Anthropology and Militant Ethnography

Today, anthropology is better known as a discipline that still grapples with its colonial past more than as a discipline that has an affinity with anarchy. In Fragments of an Anarchist Anthropology, David Graeber suggests that anthropology shares a particular affinity with anarchist theory because of its history of with working within "stateless" societies and how it accounts for the range of human possibilities in terms of social organization, power, and authority. Thus, he calls for the need to create a body of social theory gravitating around anarchism. This includes developing methods for radical critical engagement with and understanding of social processes. Anarchist thought and practice has left its mark on a series of high-profile social movements over the past few years, such as the uprisings in the Arab world, indigenous autonomous zones in Latin America, Occupy Wall Street, and Black Lives Matter. In turn, some anthropologists have taken up militant ethnography, a burgeoning approach to qualitative research that is consciously politicized, enabling activist-researchers to engage directly with radical social movement(s). We will explore: anthropological theories and practices of democracy; the power of the state; social movements; and the anthropology of politics, culture and power. Topics include: collectivism, autonomy, solidarity, anarcho-primitivism, anarchist ecology (including non-hierarchical connections with the natural world), non-market productions, relationships, ethics, political insurrections and revolutionary movements, experimental societies and utopian communities, power structures, democracy and horizontal power. As the study of domination is informed by the legacy of slavery and the enduring structures of settler colonialism, the case studies for this course will be drawn primarily (though not exclusively) from the Americas.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: AMST319
Prereq: None

ANTH316 Critical Global Health

What does it mean to approach global health as not an applied science but an ethnographic object? This course will explore this question by bringing critical, social science perspectives to bear on global health issues and interventions. This course covers three areas of scholarship. First, we will examine the processes by which social inequalities produce patterns of health and disease in globalizing contexts. This will be followed by an interrogation of the term "global health," in which we will trace its emergence as a discourse and enterprise and unpack its contested meanings. While some view global health as a clinical practice, others conceptualize it as a business, security concern, charitable duty, or human right; yet another camp probes the term's ideological construction. We will consider how such vantage points are underpinned by cultural assumptions and ethical agendas that, in turn, can determine how, and to whom, care is delivered. As a third area of inquiry, we will investigate the implications and unintended effects of doing global health by probing such questions as, When are good intentions not good enough? How useful is biomedicine for alleviating locally defined problems? Under what conditions does global health exacerbate the social inequalities it seeks to overcome?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: SISP318
Prereq: None

ANTH317 Culture and Consumption

This seminar examines the formation, development, and contemporary forms of cultures of consumption in EuroAmerican societies and their gobal exportation and adaptation to diverse local situations. The course is premised on the idea that the spectacular and continuous rise of commodity consumption that began in the late 17th century is as much a cultural as an economic process, one that both shaped and was shaped by shifts in ideas about personal and social development. Once associated with negative meanings of waste, excess, and depletion, consuming, especially of clothes, domestic goods, new foods and beverages, and artistic forms, came to be seen as a critical dimension of self-fashioning and sociability. While the course situates these developments in the context of expanding markets and new modes of distribution, it will emphasize the post-purchase moments of consumption, that is, the ways in which consumers incorporate goods into their everyday lives. Among the themes we will consider are the gendering of consumption, the social dynamics of taste, commodity consumption and ideologies of authenticity, consumption and social inequality, the consequences of consumption, and the emergence of the ethical consumer.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH318 Global Indigeneities

This course focuses on theories of indigeneity in examining indigenous peoples' lives, cultural practices, resistance and activism. The term "indigenous" has had varied and contested genealogies across time, geography, political contexts, and fields of study. Although dominant societies tend to claim that indigenous peoples are either entirely extinct due to genocide or diluted due to racial and cultural mixing, indigenous refers to the wide range of relations to region and nation of the more than 370 million indigenous people who are spread across 70 countries worldwide. Some indigenous peoples define themselves by their historical continuity with precolonial and presettler societies; others by ties to territories and surrounding natural resources; others in relation to distinct social, economic, or political systems; and still others by their distinct languages, cultures, and beliefs. Attempts at the historical erasure and subsequent memorialization of indigenous peoples serve the colonial goals of refuting indigenous claims to land and rights and have been the primary means by which dominant populations asserted their own modernity while denying it to putatively "primitive" indigenous peoples. Today, nation-states continue to impose this notion of the "pre-modern" savage as a mechanism of control in their negotiations with indigenous peoples' legal status and land rights. This course will focus on a range of cases studies including indigenous peoples in North America contending with the states of Canada, the United States, and Mexico; Indigenas encompassed by select countries in South America; Aboriginal peoples in Australia, the Sami (across various countries in Scandinavia), the Ainu (Japan), the Maori (New Zealand), and Palestinians (Israel-Palestine). Topics will include indigenous peoples' struggles for autonomy and survival; self-determination and political status under international law; the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues; land struggles and the protection of natural resources; cultural resurgence and revival of select traditions; and varied forms of political resistance and decolonization.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH319 Toxic Sovereignties: Life after Environmental Collapse

What politics emerge at the borders of life and non-life? Representations of the human species as being on the brink of environmental collapse have becomes increasingly common, as the specters of climate change and cataclysmic environmental disaster seem to bear down ever more heavily upon us. At the same time, the increasing entanglement of human bodies with various forms of chemical and otherwise man-made pollutants presage a slightly different future, one in which, if the human species does not outright disappear, it will be fundamentally transformed. This course explores different forms of political and social action that have emerged in response to these seemingly epochal shifts. Our focus is on the ways in which the shifting borders between human life and its artificially produced absence can serve as productive sites of new political forms and transformations of older ones, even as they also generate tremendous social and cultural anxiety.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH349 The Human Skeleton

The human skeleton is a window into our past, providing the framework for biographies of individual lives and narratives about the evolution of our species. Through lectures and hands-on laboratory sessions, students will learn the complete anatomy of the human skeleton, with an emphasis on functional and evolutionary perspectives. We will also explore the applications of human osteology in forensic anthropology and bioarchaeology. By the conclusion of the course, students will be able to conduct basic skeletal analysis and will be prepared for more advanced studies of the skeleton in medical, forensic, archaeological, and evolutionary contexts.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH355 Social Movements Lab

What can we learn from social justice activists about the economic, political, and environmental struggles facing us today, including mass incarceration, immigration, economic precarity, and the violence of the state? Where are the critical sites of queer, trans, left, feminist, black, indigenous, disability, and environmental struggle? How do these movements converge, and where do they diverge?

This participatory, interdisciplinary research seminar enables you to embark on an independent, semester-long research project on the social movement or activism of your choice. We'll start with some foundational reading on multidisciplinary social movement research; archival, ethnographic, and participatory methodologies; and histories of social justice struggles in the U.S. The remainder and majority of the seminar is laboratory style, taking shape around your particular projects. Each week, we will collaboratively analyze one or two projects, mapping out and comparing methods, goals, visions, struggles, and contexts of the movements under study. Our goal is to understand a range of social justice activisms in their economic, political, and historical context, with an eye toward integrating activist scholarship and social change.

The activism you research can be contemporary or historical; local, national, or global; and can take any shape: direct action, community organizing, activist philanthropy, art as activism, etc. You do not need previous experience or activist contacts for this course--just passion and the desire to learn collaboratively!
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CHUM
Identical With: CHUM355, FGSS355
Prereq: None

ANTH360 Alter(ed)native Approaches to Decolonizing Anthropology

The primary aim of this seminar is to study various theoretical and methodological entry points into decolonizing anthropology (Harrison and Harrison). Considering academe's investment and attachment to hierarchies of knowledge, is it possible to decolonize the discipline given its complicit history in processes of racialization? What would a decolonized anthropology look like, and what does interdisciplinarity have to do with it? Lastly, how can it be put into practice? To this end, we will take alter(ed)native approaches to engaging the "Race: Are We So Different" project to raise fundamental epistemological and pedagogical questions concerning Otherness and/in anthropology as well as in/and research as praxis. With this contemplative foundation, students are expected to create a decolonized anthropology project that's so fire! This is a project-based course.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: ANTH101

ANTH361 Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: The Dark Turn in Television Storytelling

This course, offered in association with the Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing, examines a certain tendency in contemporary television storytelling. Taking the debut of "The Sopranos" in 1999 as a benchmark, we will explore the emergence in dramas and comedies of a dark, uncertain, pessimistic, or disillusioned address within a medium long known for its reassuring tone. We will consider the industrial and social conditions for this tonal shift, as well as the role it has played in elevating public perceptions of television's cultural value. The course will use the "beat model" developed in certain Calderwood Seminars, where students become "experts" in specific bodies of material. In this case, students will select a particular series on which they will focus over much of the course.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-FILM
Identical With: FILM362, AMST362
Prereq: None

ANTH372 Archaeology of Death

The material culture and biological remains associated with death represent a major component of the archaeological record. Funerary assemblages can provide information about, for example, ritual practices, beliefs, social organization, the division of labor, diet, and health. Tombs and monuments are important elements of sacred landscapes. The course will examine how archaeologists and biological anthropologists investigate and analyze mortuary facilities, grave goods, skeletal remains, and sacred landscapes to make inferences about the past.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Identical With: ARCP372
Prereq: None

ANTH392 Sacrifice

Sacrifice entails the surrender, destruction, or self-denial of something precious or desired in exchange for peace, power, prosperity, freedom, or edification. Destruction by sacrifice, says anthropologist E. E. Evans-Pritchard, is an act of giving of the self that must be costly and "necessarily reciprocated." In sacrifice, humans come face-to-face with death without dying. Through a collection of interdisciplinary readings, this seminar examines the implications of this ruse through the themes of war, animal and human sacrifice, asceticism, acts of political immolation, big-game hunting, high-altitude mountaineering and extreme sports, and the experience of excess in festivals such as Burning Man.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: None

ANTH395 The Anthropology of Religion

What do we study when we study religion? We can observe practices, record speech, examine objects and actions--but what do these things tell us? If religion is about belief, what can we say about belief from documenting actions? Perhaps we must conclude that religion is not about belief, but if so, are in danger of "explaining away" the very phenomena we seek to understand? This course will introduce students to a cross-cultural, comparative perspective on religious practice and belief in order to critically reflect on the role of methodology and research design in the study of religion and the social sciences more broadly. How do we know what we know? How do we plan research in order to find out what we want to know? The course has a significant methods component. Students will be expected to do field research exercises in a local religious community and prepare a methodology research proposal for a fictional or real project as a final assignment. Methodological exercises will be interspersed with ethnographic texts that allow us to reflect on how religion is studied, experienced, and explained. Students planning theses or other research projects with an ethnographic component, in any social science field, may use the class and the final assignment to conceptualize and plan their projects.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: RELI395
Prereq: None

ANTH400 Cultural Analysis: Senior Capstone Seminar

This seminar is required for all senior sociocultural anthropology majors who intend to write honors theses and is very strongly recommended for those writing senior essays. It is designed to enable students to pursue individual research projects in a group context and with attention to debates on the nature of anthropological interpretation. Each student gives a series of presentations on her or his own research project to the group; equally important is engaging with and offering constructive criticism of the projects presented by others.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-ANTH
Prereq: ANTH296 OR ANTH295

ANTH401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH403 Department/Program Project or Essay

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

ANTH404 Department/Program Project or Essay

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

ANTH407 Senior Tutorial (downgrade thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

ANTH408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

ANTH409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH419 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

ANTH420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

ANTH465 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH466 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH467 Independent Study, Undergraduate

Credit may be earned for an independent study during a summer or authorized leave of absence provided that (1) plans have been approved in advance, and (2) all specified requirements have been satisfied.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

ANTH468 Independent Study, Undergraduate

Credit may be earned for an independent study during a summer or authorized leave of absence provided that (1) plans have been approved in advance, and (2) all specified requirements have been satisfied.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

ANTH469 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

ANTH470 Independent Study, Undergraduate

Credit may be earned for an independent study during a summer or authorized leave of absence provided that (1) plans have been approved in advance, and (2) all specified requirements have been satisfied.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: None
Prereq: None

ANTH491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH496 Research Apprentice, Undergraduate

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

ANTH502 Individual Tutorial, Graduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

ANTH511 Group Tutorial, Graduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH561 Graduate Field Research

Research in the field, normally on thesis project.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH562 Graduate Field Research

Research in the field, normally on thesis project.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH589 Advanced Research, BA/MA

Intensive investigation of special research problems leading to a BA/MA thesis.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

ANTH590 Advanced Research, BA/MA

Intensive investigation of special research problems leading to a BA/MA thesis.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

ANTH591 Advanced Research, Graduate

Investigation of special problems leading to a thesis.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

ANTH592 Advanced Research, Graduate

Investigation of special problems leading to a thesis.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT