Classical Studies

The Department of Classical Studies is dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of the societies of ancient Greece and Rome. Our faculty offer a wide array of courses in language and literature, art and archaeology, history, science, mythology, and religion. Courses in classical civilization require no knowledge of Latin and Greek and range from introductory lecture courses to smaller seminars that consider critical approaches and scholarship central to the study of the ancient world. Recent courses have covered diverse topics including gender and sexuality, Roman law, death and the afterlife in Greece and Egypt, Rome and the Caesars, Alexander the Great, and the archaeology of Pompeii. Latin and Greek are offered at all levels, so students can either start the languages at Wesleyan or build on high school preparation. Introductory courses enable students to begin reading original texts by the second semester, and advanced courses engage with both ancient texts and critical approaches to those texts in modern scholarship. Many of our majors choose to complement their coursework at Wesleyan with a summer or semester spent in Greece or Italy.

Studying classical antiquity is not only rewarding in itself; it is also excellent preparation for many academic and professional pursuits. The department has sent recent majors to top graduate programs in classics, classical archaeology, and ancient history. Our alumni have also gone on to successful careers in such varied areas as law, medicine, business, journalism, music, arts administration and museum work, and education at all levels, both as teachers and administrators.

The Classical Studies Department offers two majors:  a Classical Civilization major and a Classics major.  For the requirements for the two majors, see the relevant subsections.

Classical civilization courses fall into four categories:

  • 100–199: First Year Seminars (FYS) are small, topical seminars reserved for first- or first- and second-year students.
  • 200–275: Survey courses provide an introductory overview of one aspect of the ancient world. These courses generally have high enrollment limits and have no prerequisites.
  • 276–299: Lower-level seminars are smaller courses that focus on special aspects of the ancient world and provide opportunity for discussion and specialized research but do not require any previous knowledge of classical civilization and thus have no prerequisites.
  • 300–399: Advanced seminars are small courses that explore special aspects of the ancient world and provide opportunity for discussion and specialized research. These courses may have prerequisites or may require permission of instructor.

Courses in Greek and Latin fall into three categories:

  • 101–102: First-year language courses that are intended for those with little or no prior training in the languages provide basic training in Latin and Greek and some exposure to the culture of the ancient world.
  • 201–202: Second-year, or intermediate, courses, intended for those with a year of college training or the equivalent high school training (typically four years), introduce students to selected texts in their literary and historical contexts and provide an introduction to critical approaches to classical literature.
  • 203–299: Advanced language and literature seminars focus on a rotating set of authors, genres, or periods and provide greater opportunity for discussion and specialized research.

Students unsure of what level of language course to take should consult with a member of the department.

Faculty

Abderrahman Aissa
BA, University of Colorado Boulder; MA, University of Colorado Boulder
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Arabic

Kate Birney
BA, Yale University; MT, Harvard University; PHD, Harvard University
Associate Professor of Classical Studies; Chair, Archaeology; Associate Professor, Archaeology; Associate Professor, Art History

Christopher Parslow
BA, Grinnell College; MA, University of Iowa; PHD, Duke University
Robert Rich Professor of Latin; Professor of Classical Studies; Professor, Archaeology; Professor, Art History

Andrew Szegedy-Maszak
BA, University of Michigan; MA, Princeton University; MAA, Wesleyan University; PHD, Princeton University
Jane A. Seney Professor of Greek; Professor of Classical Studies; Professor, Environmental Studies

Eirene Visvardi
BA, University of Crete; MPHIL, Cambridge University; PHD, Stanford University
Associate Professor of Classical Studies; Chair, Classical Studies

Visiting Faculty

Elizabeth A. Bobrick
BA, Marlboro College; MA, Johns Hopkins University; PHD, Johns Hopkins University
Writing Consultant; Visiting Scholar in Classical Studies

Serena S. Witzke
BA, Mcmaster University; MA, Mcmaster University; PHD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Visiting Assistant Professor of Classical Studies

Emeriti

Marilyn A. Katz
BS, Columbia University; MA, Yale University; MAA, Wesleyan University; PHD, Yale University
Professor of Classical Studies, Emerita

Michael J. Roberts
BA, Cambridge University; MA, Cambridge University; MA, University of Illinois Urbana; MAA, Wesleyan University; PHD, University of Illinois Urbana
Robert Rich Professor of Latin, Emeritus

Departmental Advising Experts

Kate Birney, Greek Archaeology; Christopher Parslow, Roman Archaeology, Latin, History; Andrew Szegedy-Maszak, Classical Civilization, Greek History; Eirene Visvardi, Greek  

Classical Civilization

CCIV112F Three Great Myths: Prometheus, Persephone, and Dionysus (FYS)

This course is a detailed analysis of three important myths from classical antiquity: the stories of Prometheus, Persephone, and Dionysus. Students will examine literary and visual representations from antiquity and also consider how these myths live on in the Western tradition.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

CCIV115F Crafting (Un)Ideal States: Utopias and Games of the Mind, Past and Present (FYS)

Utopias are imaginary places that promise freedom, equality, and happiness. In this course, we will look at different visions of utopian living: What kinds of hope, longing, and impulses do these utopias fulfill? What kind of social critique do they imply? How can they offer freedom and happiness while built on strict programs of biological, psychological, and social engineering? When does one's utopia become another's dystopia?

We will start with ancient Greek poetry and philosophy--Homer, tragedy, Aristophanic comedy, and Plato--to trace the beginnings of utopian thinking and the promises that it makes. In the last part of the semester, we will look at how these early seeds of utopia are recast and developed in later and contemporary literature, theory, and television shows, including Thomas More's "Utopia" and Emily St. John Mandel's "Station Eleven"; selections from T. Adorno, E. Bloch, and F. Jameson; and select episodes from "Black Mirror."
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

CCIV118 The Fall of Rome and Other Stories

The fifth-century fall of Rome to barbarian invaders is an idea that slowly crystallized over time. This course will examine the birth and development of this "fall"--one of the most persistent stories in history--using the very texts in which it was first articulated. We will work with a range of authors--Suetonius, Eusebius of Caesarea, Ammianus Marcellinus, Augustine of Hippo, Jordanes, Procopius of Caesarea--to connect the fall of Rome with other attempts to explain catastrophe and change. The course will conclude by surveying the persistence of the fall of Rome as an idea, through the medieval, early modern, and modern periods, right into contemporary discourse.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-COL
Identical With: COL247, HIST247
Prereq: None

CCIV153F Single Combat in the Ancient World (FYS)

This course celebrates the clash of warriors in warfare, sport, and spectacle in the classical world. Using primary sources and archaeological evidence, the class will survey traditions of combat in ancient art, literature, and society, beginning with Greek and Near Eastern epic; the modes of warfare in Greek society; ancient Olympic combat sports; and, finally, Roman gladiator spectacle. We will examine the role of violent sport in Greek and Roman society, the reception of the competitors, and the use of these events for political or nationalistic ends. Throughout the course we will explore the flexibility of concepts such as military ethics, "western" warfare, violence, honor, and excellence, both in the classical world and in our modern lives.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: ARCP153
Prereq: None

CCIV170 Rome and the Caesars

The Roman world changed irrevocably with the establishment of the Augustan principate (i.e., when Augustus became first emperor, 27BCE--14CE). But it was only after Augustus' death that the consequences of his reforms became apparent. Rome suffered a turbulent century under a succession of emperors, variously represented as mad, bad, and dangerous to know. In this course we will study the period through contemporary or near-contemporary texts in an attempt to analyze the demoralization of the traditional Roman ruling classes and the slide into autocracy. We will examine the characters and policies of emperors from the period and will discuss the rise of a celebrity culture and the increased importance of public spectacles and entertainments. We will also look at modern portrayals of the period in visual media (e.g., art, TV, movies).
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

CCIV175F Hold My Wine: Drinking Culture in Ancient Greece (FYS)

Wine. Politics. Poetry. The potential for destructive behavior. All of these went hand-in-hand with the ancient Greek "symposium," or drinking party. In this course we will study this custom and the roles it played in Ancient Greek society and art, as an institution that regulated membership in elite society, a source of political and social unrest, a religious practice, an arena for the contestation of philosophical ideas, and a venue for the performance of music and poetry. In addition to the symposium itself, we will also consider related institutions, such as Spartan military feasting.

In this course, the symposium will be viewed through a variety of lenses. We will survey Greek literature from Homer down through Athenian drama and Plato. We will also study the archaeological record, with units on Greek vases and drinkware, and on the architecture of public and private drinking spaces. But the Greek symposium will itself be a lens through which we consider drinking culture in our own society, and its representation, for instance, in music and film.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

CCIV190 Beware the Ides, Beware the Hemlock: Roleplaying Crisis in Ancient Greece and Rome

The Thirty Tyrants have at long last been expelled from Athens, and now it is up to you and your closest friends and enemies to determine the future of the greatest city-state in the Mediterranean. The conspiracy of Catiline has been uncovered, and the fate of the conspirators and of Rome rests in your hands. Two decades later, the dictator Julius Caesar has been assassinated, and it falls upon you to negotiate the Senate to decide what the People of Rome should do. Students will play in a number of "Reacting to the Past" scenarios set in ancient Greece and Rome--becoming stakeholders in these world-changing crises as they fight, speak, study, sweet-talk, and coerce their way to power over their classmates, be they allies or adversaries. This course is suitable for students of all interests and backgrounds and will offer opportunities to develop writing public-speaking, critical thinking, and persuasion skills.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

CCIV201 Art and Archaeology of the Bronze Age Mediterranean

This course is an introduction to the history, art, and archaeology of the Bronze Age Mediterranean. Throughout the semester we will explore the development of civilization and high society in the Aegean world (mainland Greece, the islands, Cyprus, and Crete), the rise of Minoan and Mycenaean palace power, the origin of the biblical Philistines, and, of course, the historical evidence for the Trojan War. We also look at the contemporary Near Eastern cultures with which these societies interacted, exploring the reciprocal exchange between the Aegean world and Egypt, Syria, and the Hittite kingdoms. For each period we will survey the major archaeological sites (civic and cultic), examine archaeological questions, and study the development of sculpture, painting, ceramics, and architectural trends in light of political and social changes.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: ARHA202, ARCP201
Prereq: None

CCIV202 Greek Drama: Theater and Social Justice, Ancient and Modern

This course introduces students to Greek drama as produced in its original setting in ancient Athens and then adapted in modern times. The majority of our readings will be drawn from classical material: tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, comedies by Aristophanes, and selections from Aristotle's Poetics and Plato's Republic. We will look at production practices, acting and audience experience, and the role of theater in shaping cultural values. Questions will include: How does theater as art reflect the personal, social, and political life of the Athenians? What is the connection between the development of Greek drama and the growth of the first democracy? What are the emotions of tragedy ¿ for its mythic characters and for its real audience? And why have we been talking about catharsis for centuries? What is the relationship between emotions, drama, and social justice? For the last part of the semester, we will turn to adaptations of Greek tragedy in the 20th and 21st centuries by Jean-Paul Sartre, Bertolt Brecht, Sarah Kane, and Yael Farber. We will discuss how the dilemmas and emotions of tragedy are replayed in response to World War II, the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, PTSD, and consumer culture, among others.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: THEA202
Prereq: None

CCIV205 Myths, Monsters, and Misogyny: An Introduction to Greek and Roman Mythology

In this class we will read literary versions of myths from Greece and Rome and look at representations in ancient and later art. Starting with myths of the creation, we will move on to look at the individual gods and goddesses, their powers, and their place in ancient religion, then to the often perilous interactions of humans and gods. In the second half of the semester, we will concentrate on the heroes and heroines of mythology, ending with the Trojan War and its aftermath. The course aims to give a basic grounding in the stories and the images--creating mythologically literate students. As that analogy implies, we will also analyze myth as a system of communication and consider how these myths portray the world, the divine, and the place of men and women in relation to the gods, to nature, and to society.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

CCIV212 Politics and Piety in Early Christianities

The first four centuries of the Christian era will illustrate the lively twists and turns of social experimentation that set the stage for the emergence of the Christian religion. This course will be concerned with fundamental arenas of intellectual and social conflict, including constructions of Christian myths of apostolic origins and authority; the appropriation of the Jewish epic; the challenge of gnosticism; the domestication of Greek philosophy; interpretations of sexuality and gender; experiences of martyrdom and prosecution; theological reflections on human nature and society; and the ways Christians were seen by Romans. The objective will be to grasp the beginnings of the Christian religion as a human achievement of cultural consequence.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-RELI
Identical With: RELI215, MDST215
Prereq: None

CCIV214 Survey of Greek Archaeology

This course introduces the art and archaeology of Greek civilization from Mycenaean palaces of the Bronze Age, to tombs of warriors and battlefields of Marathon, through the theatrical and political centers of democratic Athens. Throughout the semester we will survey the major archaeological sites (civic and cultic) for each period and study development of sculpture, painting, ceramics, and architectural trends in light of political (propaganda!) and social changes. More than a tour of monuments and mosaics, however, this course will show students how to interpret and apply literature, material science, anthropology, and art history to address archaeological questions, and to consider the relationship (ancient and modern) between social trends and material evidence.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: ARHA203, ARCP214
Prereq: None

CCIV217 Philosophical Classics I: Ancient Western Philosophy

This course provides an overview of the development of Ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, from its inception in the 6th century BCE through to Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans, and the Stoics. In exploring this material, we will touch on all or nearly all of the central concerns of the Western philosophical tradition: metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, politics, aesthetics, religion, and logic. Our focus in class will be on the close analysis of primary texts. Students must be willing to engage with readings that are fascinating but at the same time dense, difficult, and perplexing. The course requires no prior experience in philosophy and should be of equal interest to students who are pursuing or intend to pursue other majors.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-PHIL
Identical With: PHIL201, COL359
Prereq: None

CCIV220 Homer and the Epic

In this course we will read both the Iliad and the Odyssey (in English translation). These two great epics are recognized as the first major texts of the Western literary tradition, and they have had an incalculable influence on everything from literature, to history, to the visual arts. Through a close reading of both epics, we will consider issues such as Homeric composition and poetic practice, heroes and the heroic code, the relation between humans and gods, the role of fate, and the structure of Homeric society (e.g., the status of women; clan and community). We will also read a number of contemporary critical essays to help us frame our discussions.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: ENGL219
Prereq: None

CCIV223 Survey of Roman Archaeology and Art

This course begins with the art, archaeology, and culture of the Etruscans and their important contributions to the early history of Rome. After a brief examination of the influences of Hellenistic culture on Rome, the course surveys the archaeological evidence illustrating the principal architectural and artistic achievements of the Romans down to the reign of Constantine the Great.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ART
Identical With: ARHA207, ARCP223
Prereq: None

CCIV227 Ancient Laughter

Are we hard-wired to laugh? Could we have told a joke to an ancient Roman? Did the ancient Greeks think the same things were funny? Would they scoff at a "dirty" joke? Are puns universal, and universally terrible? This course will seek to examine the basis for Greek and Roman humor through a close examination of its humorous texts and the contextualizing voice of scholars on the Greco-Roman world. What we will discover in this course is that many of the modes, topics, techniques, and aims of comedy most familiar to us were employed by the ancient Greeks and Romans; often our own version owes a substantial debt to theirs. Comedic literature will also offer us a unique look at Greek and Roman culture, set as it is--much like our own comedy and satire--in a skewed version of everyday "reality." This course will be organized into three main units, structured around three main modes of ancient comic literature: dramatic comedy (the precursor to modern situation comedy), satire (a forerunner of stand-up comedy), and comic narrative (the wellspring of the comic novel). At the end of the course, we will return to three masterpieces in each mode--Aristophanes, THE FROGS; Juvenals, SATIRES; and Petronius, SATYRICON--and apply the critical tools we have developed to a richer analysis of the interaction between these texts and the society of readers and authors that produced them.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

CCIV228 Classical Allusions in Film

This course surveys the influence of classical antiquity on Western filmmaking from the late 1970s to the present day, with an emphasis on exploring the ways in which filmmakers allude to and encounter classical themes, settings, characters, history, and literature in their works. Classical mythology and history have been a source of fascination for filmmakers since the beginning of filmmaking itself. Ben Hur (1907), Quo Vadis (1913) and Cabiria (1914) were all silent but ambitious films depicting aspects of classical antiquity on an epic scale that would have a profound impact on the classical blockbusters of the 1950s and 1960s. Cecil B. DeMille reintroduced the classical model with Ten Commandments (1956), and the epic(ally expensive) Ben-Hur (1959), Spartacus (1960), and Cleopatra (1963) would follow under other directors. These films can be analyzed for their interpretation of ancient material; their contemporary political subtexts and attitudes towards race, ethnicity, and gender; and their influence on the way 20th century Western cultures viewed Greco-Roman antiquity. Other film classics depicted an ancient world that ranged from dreamlike (Fellini's Satyricon [1969]) to pornographic (Caligula [1979]), to fantastical (Clash of the Titans [1981]). We will briefly examine these films as a springboard for looking at late-20th and early-21st century adaptations of classical material.

Classical material in film regained popularity in the 2000s: Gladiator (2000), Troy (2004), Alexander (2004), 300 (2006), Clash of the Titans (2010), and Pompeii (2014), and the 2016 remake of Ben Hur. But beyond these obviously classically-inspired films, situated as they are in a version of classical antiquity, there are other modern films that draw less obviously on classical material. O Brother Where Art Thou? (2001) takes the Odyssey from Homer's Mediterranean world and drops it into Depression-era Southern America. Chi-raq resituates Aristophanes' Lysistrata in gang-ravaged Chicago. The Star Wars (1977-83) and Hunger Games (2012-15) trilogies use a reimagined Roman Empire to comment on spectacle and society in contemporary America.

We will study these films and others to analyze the trajectory of classical allusion in modern film: why do directors continue to revisit classical antiquity? What themes are pervasive? How do ancient archetypes like the seductive queen, evil sorceress, noble enslaved man, old philosopher, and debauched aristocrat help characterize modern film characters? What is the difference between adaptation and inspiration? How closely must modern interpretations cleave to the ancient material to be deemed "acceptable" by scholars and enthusiasts? How do these interpretations reshape our understanding of the ancient material? And why is classical antiquity still so compelling today?
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

CCIV229 Ancient Monuments: Landscape, History, and Memory

In this course, we will examine some of the most renowned sites from Greek and Roman antiquity, such as the Parthenon and the other monuments on and near the Athenian Acropolis, the Colosseum and Forum in Rome, and Pompeii. The aim is to get a broad understanding of their significance, and so the sources will include ancient texts, modern scholarship and travel narrative, and visual representations such as drawings and photographs. Because the course is connected to a theme of "shifting landscapes," we will pay particular attention to the ways in which the ancient sites interact with their surroundings.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENVS
Identical With: ENVS229
Prereq: None

CCIV231 Greek History

Using primary sources wherever possible, this course will examine the development of Greek civilization from Mycenaean times through the death of Alexander the Great. Special attention will be given to the connection between political events and cultural and intellectual trends. No prior acquaintance with ancient history is required.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CLAS
Identical With: HIST204
Prereq: None

CCIV232 Roman History

This course traces the history of Rome from its foundation, through its rise as an Italic and Mediterranean power, up to the transfer of the empire to Constantinople. It focuses on the political, military, and social achievements of the Roman people and the contributions of its principal historical figures, from the legendary kings of the regal period, to Republican leaders such as Marius, Sulla, Pompey, and Caesar, through Augustus and the establishment of the principate and subsequent emperors such as Vespasian, Hadrian, and Diocletian.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-CLAS
Identical With: HIST205
Prereq: None

CCIV234 Art and Society in Ancient Pompeii

This seminar surveys the art, architecture, and material remains of the cities buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 CE. Through readings, class discussions, and student research presentations, we will explore the ways in which this material can be used to study the social and political life of a small Roman city and examine the unique evidence for reconstructing the private life of Roman citizens, from their participation in local politics and government, to their religious beliefs and lives, to the interior decoration of their homes and their burial customs.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: ARHA225, ARCP234
Prereq: None

CCIV244 Pyramids and Funeral Pyres: Death and the Afterlife in Greece and Egypt

This course explores the archaeology of death and burial in Egypt and Greece, from the royal burials in the pyramids at Giza, to the cremated remains of warriors in Lefkandi, Greece, to the humble burials of infants under house floors. Drawing upon a blend of archaeological, art historical, and mythological evidence, we will examine how the funerary practices and the very notions of the soul, the body, and the afterlife compare in these two societies. We will also explore how social class, gender, and ethnicity influenced those ideas. The course will also provide an introduction to archaeological theory and the interpretive strategies employed by archaeologists, art historians, and historians in the reconstruction of ancient societies.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: ARCP244, ARHA219
Prereq: None

CCIV248 Dissecting Language: Medical, Legal, and Scientific Terminology in Context

Calling all pre-med, pre-law, and science students! Etymology is a course designed to prepare students for disciplines far beyond traditional "classics." The course will provide a strategic presentation of key Latin and Greek roots, constructions, and linguistic frameworks that are pervasive in legal, medical, and scientific terminology. Beyond simply learning to deconstruct terminology, the course will also explore the origins and evolution of many of the commonly used modern terms in their original historical contexts, providing a glimpse into the rich background that gave rise to their use and nuance today. The semester will be broken up into seven units in general science, biology, chemistry, government and politics, pre-med, pre-law, and sociology. Two of the three days will focus on analyzing the various origins of words and phrases in a particular discipline, while the third will include activities and look at applications in media, movies, and other popular culture.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

CCIV257 Plato's REPUBLIC

"The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato." This declaration, famously made by Alfred North Whitehead in the early 20th century, seems especially true of Plato's Republic. No other work in the Western tradition can lay claim to setting the tone so influentially for the development of philosophy as a discipline. Almost every branch of philosophical thought we are familiar with today--on matters of ethics, politics, moral psychology, epistemology, metaphysics, and aesthetics--receives a major formulation in this text. This seminar will be devoted to a close reading of each of the 10 books of The Republic alongside various perspectives that have been taken on this magisterial work in contemporary philosophy, journalism, and literature. We will focus on The Republic primarily as a work of moral psychology by investigating the topical question of the dialogue: Why is it better to live justly rather than unjustly? For Plato, a just life is one governed by the pursuit of wisdom or learning, and this he believes will also be a psychologically healthy one. By contrast, a life governed by the indiscriminate pursuit of power--the life of a tyrant--is psychologically corrupted. These are bold claims. What is Plato's argument for them? In raising this question, we will consider the political project Plato embarks upon in the Republic in constructing a just society, as well as connected issues he raises in the dialogue concerning the nature of human motivation, the distinction between belief and knowledge, the distinction between appearance and reality, the importance of a proper education to the human good, and the role of art and beauty in furthering the common good. Alongside Plato, we will read various works of secondary literature, journalistic pieces, and works of fiction this semester, all inspired by The Republic.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: SBS-PHIL
Identical With: PHIL303, COL341
Prereq: None

CCIV271 Roman Self-Fashioning: Poets and Philosophers, Lovers and Friends

With the descent into chaos of the Roman Republic and the emergence of the emperor as autocratic ruler at the head of the state, Roman social order and its system of personal relationships experienced a crisis. These circumstances are reflected in the literature of the period, which shows a fascination with unconventional styles of life and codes of behavior and a constant recourse to those situations in public and private life where the individual's relationship to the social order was negotiated and exhibited. Among the topics we will examine in the writings of some of the major authors of the period will be the literature of love and the role of the lover; parasites, patronage, and friendship; banquets and dining; the good life and personal contentment (and discontent); and the struggle for individual integrity.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

CCIV281 Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greek Culture

In this course we will examine the construction of gender roles in ancient Greece and approach gender as an organizing principle of private and public life in ancient Greek society. Using literary, scientific, historical, and philosophical sources as well as material evidence, we will address issues including the creation of woman, conceptions of the male and female body, the legal status of men and women; what constitutes acceptable sexual practices and for whom (e.g., heterosexual relationships, homoeroticism, prostitution, adultery); and ideas regarding desire, masculinity and femininity, and their cultivation in social, political, and ritual contexts such as rituals of initiation, marriage, drinking parties, the law court, and the theater. How ancient approaches to gender and sexuality are in dialogue or have informed recent debates will be a question throughout the course. We will end by looking at how ideas about sexuality in classical antiquity were used in ROMER V. EVANS, otherwise known as the 1993 Colorado Gay Rights Case.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS, SBS-CLAS
Identical With: FGSS281
Prereq: None

CCIV283 Off with its Pedestal! The Greek Vase as Art and Artifact

This course explores the dual role of the Greek vase--as objét d'art and as material culture. The first half of the course will trace the origins and development of Greek vase painting from Mycenaean pictorial vases to the masters of Attic Red Figure, examining the painters, the themes, and (often titillating!) subject matter in its social and historical context. The second half will focus on the vase as an artifact and tool for reconstructing social values and economic trends throughout the Mediterranean. We will look at rip-offs, knock-offs, and how much Attic pottery was really worth, and evaluate the use of pottery as an indicator of immigration or cultural imitation. The course will include work with 3D scanning and digital optimization, as well as the construction of a virtual museum exhibit.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: ARCP285, ARHA204
Prereq: None

CCIV324 Tales of Hope or States of Delusion? Utopias, Past and Present

Utopias are imaginary places that promise freedom, equality, and happiness. In this course, we will look at different visions of utopian living: What kinds of longing and impulses do these utopias fulfill? What kind of social critique do they imply? How can they offer freedom and happiness, while built on strict programs of biological, psychological, and social engineering? When does one's utopia become another's dystopia?

We will start with ancient Greek poetry and philosophy--Homer, tragedy, Aristophanic comedy, and Plato--to trace the beginnings of utopian thinking and the promises that it makes. In the last part of the semester, we will look at how these early seeds of utopia are recast and developed in later and contemporary literature, theory, and film including Thomas More's UTOPIA, Yevgeny Zamyatin's WE, and Emily St. John Mandel STATION ELEVEN; selections from T. Adorno, E. Bloch, and F. Jameson; films such as Gattaca, and Her, and select episodes from Black Mirror.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

CCIV329 Roman Villa Life

This seminar will explore life in the Roman countryside, from the luxurious suburban villas near major urban centers to working estates in Italy and the Roman provinces. The course will begin with a general survey of Roman villa life and then move to a more focused inquiry into specific topics including art and architecture, production, slave life, and transportation. Readings will be drawn from ancient literary sources, inscriptions, and modern social and archaeological studies. The course is intended for students from a variety of disciplines and backgrounds, but some knowledge of the Roman world is recommended.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: ARCP329
Prereq: None

CCIV330 Classical Studies Today: Writing for a General Audience

This will be a seminar for junior and senior departmental majors, offered in association with the Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing. The purpose of the class is to have students write about scholarly issues in a way that makes them accessible to broad non-specialist audiences. This practice is what one scholar has called "responsible popularization." The course will concentrate on writing and public presentations, and each week the students will take alternating roles as writers and editors. The work load consists of reading scholarly articles or book chapters, on academic topics from Classical Studies, and re-work them in compact genres like personal essays, op-eds, blog posts,and reviews. For the final project, the students will form teams of two, each of which will interview an eminent Classical scholar of their choice and produce a brief profile.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

CCIV341 Visualizing the Classical

This project-based learning course integrates archaeology, classical texts, and the technologies of virtual construction to rebuild the material remains of the ancient world. Student teams will draw upon theories of urban design, engineering, and performance theory to create a material or virtual reconstruction of a classical built environment or object. Through the reconstruction of such spaces, we will explore how the ancient builders and craftsmen--through landscape, sound, light, functionality/monumentality, and spatial relationships--shaped the experience of the ancient viewer.

The course is divided into three modules. The first module will use case studies to survey the principles of archaeological reconstruction and explore the concepts and language of design and planning used by archaeologists and design specialists. These case studies will range from Greek and Roman temples, to city blocks and houses, to public spaces for entertainment or governance. In the second module, a series of technology workshops and in-class projects will give students hands-on training in the analytical mapping, modeling, interpretive, and reconstructive approaches such as ArcGIS, CAD, Sketchup and 3D printing. This practical training will form the foundation for the third module, during which student teams will apply these technologies to collaborate on the reconstruction of an ancient built environment or object. During this section of the course, students will discuss and collectively troubleshoot the problems of design and reconstruction they encounter as they go. Students will present their work at the end of the course, and discussion will focus on the insight that the process of reconstruction has offered into principles of ancient design and the values of ancient communities.

This seminar will be of interest to students with experience in classical studies, archaeology, studio arts, and digital design.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: ARCP341, ARHA205
Prereq: None

CCIV393 Reading Theories

In this survey of theories that have shaped the reading of literature and the analysis of culture, emphasis is on key concepts--language, identity, subjectivity, gender, power, and knowledge--and on key figures and schools such as Marx, Freud, Nietzsche, Saussure, Barthes, Gramsci, Benjamin, Althusser, Foucault, Lacan, Deleuze, Jameson, postmodernism, and U.S. feminism.
Offering: Crosslisting
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-ENGL
Identical With: ENGL295, COL339, CEAS340, RL&L290, GRST231, RUSS340, RULE340, REES340
Prereq: None

CCIV401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CCIV402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CCIV403 Department/Program Project or Essay

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CCIV404 Department/Program Project or Essay

Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CCIV407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CCIV408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

CCIV409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CCIV410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CCIV411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CCIV412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CCIV420 Student Forum

Student-run group tutorial, sponsored by a faculty member and approved by the chair of a department or program.
Offering: Host
Grading: Cr/U

CCIV465 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CCIV466 Education in the Field, Undergraduate

Students must consult with the department and class dean in advance of undertaking education in the field for approval of the nature of the responsibilities and method of evaluation.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CCIV491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

CCIV492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

Greek

GRK101 Introduction to Ancient Greek: Semester I

This course is an introduction to the rich and beautiful language of ancient Greek, the language of Homer, Plato, and Euripides. In the first semester students will begin to learn the grammar and syntax of the language and start developing the vocabulary necessary to appreciate and understand Greek with the goal of reading as soon as possible. Throughout the semester we will also explore some inscriptions and dip our toes into both Herodotus and biblical Greek.

This course is a prerequisite for GRK102.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

GRK102 Introduction to Ancient Greek: Semester II

This course is a continuation of GRK101. We will complete the study of Greek grammar and continue to develop vocabulary and reading skills. We will read selections from Sophocles, Euripides, Lysias, Apollodorus, Demosthenes, Aristotle, and Plato, among others.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: GRK101

GRK201 Reading Greek Prose: Plato's Crito

We will read the Crito, one of Plato's dialogues that together with his Apology and the Phaedo constitute some of our major sources about Socrates' role in Athens, his trial and conviction to death, and his own approach to death and the good life. In the Crito Socrates addresses the essence of law, the limits of tolerance, and the very notion of civil disobedience. Throughout the semester our goal will be to explore these questions while working closely with the original text to increase steadily the facility and speed with which you read and enjoy Greek. We will also read a selection of scholarly articles.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

GRK250 Body, Soul, and Afterlife Journeys in Ancient Greece (CLAC)

The connection between body and soul and their journey in the afterlife were at the center of how the ancient Greeks thought not only of mortality but also of the good life itself. This CLAC course is connected to the Classical Civilization course titled "Death and Afterlife in Egypt and Greece" that will be taught in the fall by Kate Birney. The parent course explores the archaeology of death and burial in Egypt and Greece. It examines how the funerary practices and the very notions of death, the soul, the body, and the afterlife operated in these societies by drawing upon diverse evidence--archaeological, art historical, and mythological.

In this CLAC course students with some background in ancient Greek will read selections of the surviving evidence on death and the afterlife. Sources will be drawn from diverse genres and periods: historiography, Homeric poetry, Platonic philosophy, and religious tablets. This diversity will offer a unique opportunity to identify different registers and to explore how language itself reflects and in turn shapes the ideas and practices for which it is used. We will thus be looking at: how different media and performances are used to express loss, hope, and heroism in the face of death; how social class, gender, and political ideology are reflected in these media and how they influence ideas about death and the afterlife; and, last, how we are to create adequate methodologies as "readers" of such diverse evidence.

The selections of readings will be drawn primarily from what the students read in translation in the parent course. The final selection will be based on the level of the students. This CLAC is conceived as appropriate for students on the intermediate and advanced level of ancient Greek.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: CGST250
Prereq: GRK102

GRK258 The Greek Novel

In the course we will read selections from Longus' DAPHNIS AND CHLOE and Chariton's CHAEREAS AND CALLIRHOE. The former is a story of young love in a pastoral setting on the island of Lesbos; the latter, an incident-packed narrative in which a young husband and wife are separated, but after many vicissitudes, reunited. Subjects covered will include genre and setting, narrative and descriptive techniques, cultural context, and likely readership.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

GRK263 The Homeric Hymns

Students in this course will read the Homeric hymns to Demeter, Apollo, Hermes, and Aphrodite in ancient Greek. They will also read modern scholarship on the structure of the hymns as examples of narrative discourse and on the mythology of the various divinities. Each of these hymns celebrates one of the principal divinities of the Greek pantheon, and each incorporates a story of the god's adventures. Class sessions will include discussion of the manner in which gender exercises an influence on the structure and content of the hymns.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: GRK201

GRK275 Homeric Epic

This course involves a close reading of selections in Greek from the ODYSSEY on the wanderings of Odysseus; his encounters with Polyphemus, Circe, and Kalypso; and his return to Ithaca. In addition, we will discuss major scholarly approaches to the Odyssey and Homeric epic more broadly.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

GRK291 "Sexuality" in the Making: Gender, Law, and the Use of Pleasure in Ancient Greek Culture (CLAC)

The parent course (CCIV 281/FGSS 281) examines the construction of gender roles in ancient Greece and approaches gender as an organizing principle of private and public life in ancient Greek society by using literary, scientific, historical, and philosophical sources as well as material evidence. Issues addressed include: the creation of woman, conceptions of the male and female body, the legal status of men and women; what constitutes acceptable sexual practices and for whom (e.g., heterosexual relationships, homoeroticism, prostitution etc.); ideas regarding desire, masculinity and femininity, and their cultivation in social, political, and ritual contexts such as rituals of initiation, marriage, drinking parties (symposia), the law court, and the theater.

The textual sources used in the course cover a spectrum of genres: medical texts, Homer, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, law-court speeches, and philosophy among others. In the CLAC connected to this course students with some background in ancient Greek will read selections from these genres and will be able to compare different discourses and registers in the original. In the past, even through brief lexical examples--e.g., pointing at the use of ta Aphrodisia (the things/matters related to Aphrodite) in a culture that has no one term/concept for our notion of "sexuality"--students were intrigued by how different terms and discursive media in the original may offer access to perspectives, visions, and values that differ from and can, in turn, inform our own. The CLAC will create an opportunity precisely for this kind of access and a better informed and nuanced conversation.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: CGST291
Prereq: GRK102

GRK365 Greek Tragedy: Euripides

Euripides is well known for being experimental and controversial, in his own time and beyond. Aristophanes famously accuses him of corrupting his audience by bringing too much of a democratic sentiment to his plays--women and slaves having way too much to say. Nietzsche much later will attribute to him the very death of tragedy. In this course, we will explore this legacy by reading one of his plays in the original along with diverse approaches to his work. The selection of the play will be determined by the composition of the student-group and previous exposure to Greek drama.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: THEA365
Prereq: None

GRK367 The Great Greek Creation Myth: Hesiod's Theogony

In this seminar, we will read Hesiod's Theogony, the Greek creation myth, in the original ancient Greek and examine this fabulous work in light of other creation stories of the ancient Near East, Egyptian, and Hittite cultures by which it was influenced. Through examination of structural themes and motifs (how the universe was created and ordered, the role of violence, the origins of an application of justice, the creation of mankind, the shaping of women), we will discuss whether and how the Theogony diverges from other creation myths to establish or reflect values that can be said to be uniquely Greek. Discussion will be supplemented by passages from Hesiod's Works and Days, along with other creation myths and secondary scholarship.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

GRK401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GRK402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GRK407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

GRK408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

GRK409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GRK410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GRK411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GRK412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GRK424 Advanced Research Seminar, Undergraduate

Advanced research tutorial; project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GRK491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

GRK492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

Latin

LAT101 First-Year Latin: Semester I

Conquer Latin in two semesters! Acquire a basic vocabulary and build your skills with essential grammar as you develop your ability to read passages in Latin from the principal classical authors--including Cicero, Vergil, and Ovid. This first semester covers half the textbook. In the second semester (LAT 102), you will complete the textbook.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT102 First-Year Latin: Semester II

Continue your conquest of Latin by completing your acquisition of a basic vocabulary and essential grammar.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: LAT101

LAT104 Intensive Introductory Latin

Learn Latin in a semester with this intensive introduction to grammar and syntax. Readings in original authors help illustrate and reinforce the fundamental principles of the language in preparation for more advanced reading at the intermediate level. Recommended for students wanting accelerated Latin acquisition or those with some background wanting a quick review.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT202 Ovid: METAMORPHOSES

Students will read in Latin selected stories from the METAMORPHOSES, Ovid's great un-epic epic, in which he recounts myths of shape-changers from the creation of the world down to his own time and that of the emperor Augustus. Ovid's stories inspire humor, pathos, and horror and may be grotesque or sentimental, sometimes both at the same time. They deal with issues such as divinity, power, love, rape, order, and identity, all in classic versions of famous myths influential throughout the centuries, told with the poet's distinctive wit and sense of incongruity. The class will focus on close reading of the Latin text and on Ovid's treatment of the myths and the distinctive approach he brings to the ever-shifting world he describes. The course will include an introduction to Latin meter, and class discussion will address modern critical approaches to Ovid.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT203 Latin Prose: Roman Letters

An introduction to the reading of classical Latin prose, the course will include a review of Latin grammar and syntax. Students will read selections from the letters of Seneca the Younger and Pliny the Younger. Seneca, a distinguished philosopher and statesman of the Neronian period, uses his experiences in contemporary Rome as texts from which to derive simple philosophical messages. Pliny recounts events from the life of an Italian aristocrat of the first century CE, including an eyewitness account of the eruption of Vesuvius. The course will begin slowly, with the aim of gradually acclimatizing students to the rhythms and stylistic and syntactical patterns of Latin prose. The emphasis will be on understanding and translating the Latin, but we will consider the social and cultural background to the texts we read.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT230 Love and Suffering in Ancient Rome (CLAC)

In this CLAC course students with some background in ancient Latin will read selections of the extant sources on love and suffering in Roman myth, history, and thought. The sources that we will cover will be drawn from diverse genres and periods: historiography, epic poetry, lyric poetry, and comedy. This diversity will offer a unique opportunity to students to identify and analyze the intersections of age, class, status, gender, and ethnicity and the way they shaped Roman ideology on "love." We will be looking at how cultural practice shapes language, how ideology shapes law, and how literature challenged cultural norms of love and marriage, all the while unpacking and interrogating the Roman belief that love had no place in the citizen life dedicated to serving the state: love produces suffering. In turn, we will reflect on the ideological shift in the last 150 years that has come to dominate "western" beliefs on love and marriage, that is, "all you need is love," over family, friends, and society, despite the obstacles: suffering produces love.

The selections of readings will be drawn primarily from what the students read in translation in the parent course. The final selection will be based on the level of the students. This CLAC is conceived as appropriate for students on the intermediate and advanced level of ancient Latin.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 0.50
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Identical With: CGST231
Prereq: LAT102

LAT254 Apuleius: THE GOLDEN ASS

Fast-paced, magical, sexy, and bizarre, Apuleius' GOLDEN ASS, or METAMORPHOSES, contains more than enough rowdy episodes to keep us entertained for a semester. The novel tells the story of the feckless Lucius, the man-turned-ass whose encounters with the residents of Thessaly range from the vulgar to the weird to the sublime. Our goals, in addition to reading and understanding the Latin, include tracing prominent themes and becoming acquainted with recent relevant scholarship.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT262 Reading Latin, Writing Latin

This is a nontraditional introduction to writing Latin. Through reading and discussing short selections of mainly narrative and descriptive Latin prose from all periods, from the classical to the Renaissance, students will develop greater familiarity with Latin styles and the expressive possibilities of the language. Students will try writing Latin themselves (often collaboratively and with ample opportunity for revision). Subjects will include proverbs, familiar sayings or catchphrases, song lyrics, and so forth (anything is fair game for translation), as well as short narratives, culminating in a final project. As well as developing greater facility with Latin, students will reflect on the experience of learning Latin, the history of Latin, and its place in the modern world.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-LAT
Prereq: None

LAT270 Catullus

The poetry of Catullus often has an immediate appeal to contemporary readers. In Tom Stoppard's play THE INVENTION OF LOVE, the claim is made that he invented love as we think of it. But in addition to his love poetry, Catullus is also the writer of a mini-mythological epic (an epyllion), an account of the strange story of the self-castration of Attis, wedding hymns, translations from Greek lyric, invective, and elegy. In this course, we will read an extensive selection of Catullus' poetry and discuss the critical issues they raise in the light of selected readings from modern scholarship.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT281 Roman Satire: Juvenal

Roman satire, as practiced by Lucilius, Horace, Persius, and Juvenal is a strange hybrid: it combines social criticism, literary parody, philosophical rumination, and obscene burlesque, a self-consciously "humble" genre set in the framework of dactylic hexameter, the meter of high-flown Homeric and Vergilian epic. It is among a small minority of ancient literature which directly addresses itself to the humbler aspects of the everyday lives of Roman citizens. This course on Roman satire will focus on Juvenal, the last practictioner of Roman verse satire. We will begin the course with a selection of short readings from each of the four Roman satirists in order to orient ourselves with standard topics of Roman satire (including dining, country vs. urban life, the body, sex, and gender roles) and differentiate the approaches. We will spend the rest of the semester exploring Juvena's seminal works: his first and second book of Satires, wherein he situates himself as a figure marginalized by a new order of foreign interlopers, powerful gender deviants, and tyrannical patrons and emperors, as well as Satire 10, his caustically philosophical take on the "Vanity of Human Wishes."
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT301 Petronius

Follow the down-and-out Roman Encolpius as he embarks on a titillating tour of the Mediterranean, persecuted (with impotence!) by the phallic god Priapus. Join him as he attends the longest dinner party in Latin literature, a class-crossing affair including nouveau riche, citizens, slaves, freedmen, and foreigners. In addition to reading the Latin, we will examine issues of scholarship, from the title (Satyrica? Satyricon?), to the genre, to sexuality, to class and status.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT331 Vergil: AENEID 2

Vergil's Aeneid book 2 is almost cinematic in its tragic, poignant, and frenetic depiction of the fall of Troy, from looming threat of the Trojan Horse to the firing of the city, rooftop battles, and the violent loss of loved ones while the gods manipulate events with petty disdain for human life. Students will read book 2 in its entirety in Latin, and the rest of the work in English. The purpose of this course is to continue to develop skills in reading Latin poetry and to continue the study of Latin grammar with close reading and critical analysis.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT353 Demagogues and Tyrants in the Roman Historians

Reading selections from Livy's ab Urbe Condita, Sallust's Bellum Catilinae, and Tacitus' Annales we will consider these historians' depictions of tyrants and demagogues (e.g., the Tarquins, Catiline, Tiberius, Nero) throughout Rome's political history, their views on the interactions between these controversial figures and the Senate and people of Rome, and their narratives describing the circumstances behind their rise and fall. At the same time, we will explore the role of fact vs. fiction, propaganda, and bias in the writing of Roman history through comparative analysis with contemporary sources and inscriptional evidence.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT
Credits: 1.00
Gen Ed Area: HA-CLAS
Prereq: None

LAT401 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT402 Individual Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT407 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

LAT408 Senior Tutorial (downgraded thesis)

Downgraded Senior Thesis Tutorial - Project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor. Only enrolled in through the Honors Coordinator.
Offering: Host
Grading: A-F

LAT409 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT410 Senior Thesis Tutorial

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT411 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT412 Group Tutorial, Undergraduate

Topic to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT424 Advanced Research Seminar, Undergraduate

Advanced research tutorial; project to be arranged in consultation with the tutor.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT491 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT

LAT492 Teaching Apprentice Tutorial

The teaching apprentice program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to assist in teaching a faculty member's course for academic credit.
Offering: Host
Grading: OPT